Co-auteur
  • RIFFLART Christine (5)
  • BLOT Christophe (4)
  • DUCOUDRE Bruno (3)
  • SAMPOGNARO Raul (3)
  • Voir plus
Type de Document
  • Article (8)
  • Contribution à un site web (2)
  • Working paper (1)
Au moment où les prévisions de croissance pour la France de l’OFCE étaient rendues publiques (le 18 octobre, disponibles ici), l’OFCE conviait à un atelier, appelé l’Observatoire Français des Comptes Nationaux, les différentes institutions françaises publiques (Banque de France, Direction Générale du Trésor, Insee) et internationales (Commission européenne, OCDE et FMI) ainsi que les institutions privées françaises ou opérant en France. Le sujet de la journée était la conjoncture française et son environnement international, les prévisions macroéconomiques à l’horizon 2020, les perspectives budgétaires ainsi que des éléments de méthodes ou structurels comme l’écart de production ou les déséquilibres macroéconomiques. Cette rencontre annuelle dont c’est la deuxième édition, a eu lieu mercredi 17 octobre 2018. Au total, 18 instituts pratiquant la prévision à 1 ou 2 ans étaient représentés. Une analyse détaillée de ces prévisions sera publiée prochainement dans un Policy brief de l’OFCE. [Premier paragraphe]

in World Development Publié en 2017
GUERREIRO David, Laboratoire D'economie Dionysien
0
vues

0
téléchargements
Since Sachs and Warner’s seminal article in 1995, numerous studies have addressed the link between natural resources and economic growth. Although the “resource curse” effect was commonly accepted at first, many articles have challenged its existence, and the results found in the literature are ambiguous. In this paper, we aim to quantitatively review this literature in order to (i) identify the sources of heterogeneity and (ii) assess the impact of natural resources on economic growth. A meta-analysis is performed on 69 empirical studies on the resource curse, totaling 1,419 estimates. Our findings show that (i) only developing countries suffer from the resource curse although it is soft; (ii) the way natural resources are taken into account is crucial to understand the heterogeneity found in the literature; (iii) the negative impact of the volatility of the terms-of-trade on growth should be qualified. An additional MRA performed on indirect effects size also indicate that when institutions are at their best level, the resource curse disappears and may be turned into a blessing.

in Telecommunications Policy Publié en 2014
DAUVIN Magali
GRZYBOWSKI Lukasz
0
vues

0
téléchargements
In this paper we use panel data on NUTS 1 regional data for 27 EU countries in the years 2006–2010 to analyze determinants of broadband diffusion. We estimate both linear demand specification and the logistic diffusion function. We find that, after controlling for regional differences due to socioeconomic factors, inter-platform competition approximated by an inter-platform Herfindahl index has a significant positive impact on broadband diffusion. Broadband deployment is lower in countries in which DSL has a greater share in Internet access and it is higher in countries in which cable modem has a greater share in Internet access. Moreover, we find that competition between DSL providers has a significant and positive impact on broadband penetration. First, higher prices for a fully unbundled local loop connection, which represent the cost of providing copper-based Internet services, have a significant and negative impact on broadband penetration. Second, a greater incumbent share in DSL connections has a significant and negative impact on broadband penetration.

In the euro area growth is holding up but the general outlook is less bright than in recent years. The anticipated slowdown largely results from the gradual attenuation of the post-Great Recession recovery momentum and the convergence of growth rates towards a lower potential growth path. It also coincides with a revival of political turmoil, consequently emphasizing the urgency to deal with external downsize risk by strengthening internal sources of growth—investment and private consumption. The sun has been shining but the opportunity for structural repair has not been taken. Hence, imbalances within the euro area need to be addressed in order to achieve sustainable development. The increase of public debt is one of the main legacies of the crisis. While it is currently declining, long-run simulations suggest that without further consolidation, the public debt-to-GDP ratio will not reach the arbitrary 60% target by 2035 in a number of countries. To top it off, countries that are concerned are those whose unemployment rate remains above its pre-crisis level, yet the implementation of a new fiscal consolidation would result in higher employment. It thus raises the question of this rule's sustainability. The euro area as a whole has a large trade surplus, which favors pressures for the appreciation of the euro, which can reduce growth prospects. Unlike the period before the crisis, the imbalance is clearly concentrated in surplus countries. Finally, the aforementioned imbalances make governance reforms more urgent than ever. Until now, progress in this area has proved rather timid. This work led us to three key policy insights. First, the structural adjustment needed to bring back public debt to its target would weigh on the reduction of unemployment. Euro area countries can pursue an additional fiscal consolidation provided output gap is closed, and countries with fiscal leeway should use it to sustain growth in the euro area as a whole. Secondly, the ongoing debate on the reform of the economic governance of the euro area must pay more attention to the evolution of nominal prices and wages, in order to reduce the sources of divergence. In the same time, the need to strengthen wage bargaining systems by giving the social partners a greater role is important. Finally yet importantly, the need for a greater automatic stabilization, including of a cross-border nature, in monetary union is undisputed. The proposals under discussion do go to some extent in this direction and deserve support.

In the euro area growth is holding up but the general outlook is less bright than in recent years. The anticipated slowdown largely results from the gradual attenuation of the post-Great Recession recovery momentum and the convergence of growth rates towards a lower potential growth path. It also coincides with a revival of political turmoil, consequently emphasizing the urgency to deal with external downsize risk by strengthening internal sources of growth—investment and private consumption. The sun has been shining but the opportunity for structural repair has not been taken. Hence, imbalances within the euro area need to be addressed in order to achieve sustainable development. The increase of public debt is one of the main legacies of the crisis. While it is currently declining, long-run simulations suggest that without further consolidation, the public debt-to-GDP ratio will not reach the arbitrary 60% target by 2035 in a number of countries. To top it off, countries that are concerned are those whose unemployment rate remains above its pre-crisis level, yet the implementation of a new fiscal consolidation would result in higher employment. It thus raises the question of this rule's sustainability. The euro area as a whole has a large trade surplus, which favors pressures for the appreciation of the euro, which can reduce growth prospects. Unlike the period before the crisis, the imbalance is clearly concentrated in surplus countries. Finally, the aforementioned imbalances make governance reforms more urgent than ever. Until now, progress in this area has proved rather timid. This work led us to three key policy insights. First, the structural adjustment needed to bring back public debt to its target would weigh on the reduction of unemployment. Euro area countries can pursue an additional fiscal consolidation provided output gap is closed, and countries with fiscal leeway should use it to sustain growth in the euro area as a whole. Secondly, the ongoing debate on the reform of the economic governance of the euro area must pay more attention to the evolution of nominal prices and wages, in order to reduce the sources of divergence. In the same time, the need to strengthen wage bargaining systems by giving the social partners a greater role is important. Finally yet importantly, the need for a greater automatic stabilization, including of a cross-border nature, in monetary union is undisputed. The

in International Economics Publié en 2014
DAUVIN Magali
0
vues

0
téléchargements
This paper investigates the relationship between energy prices and the real effective exchange rate of commodity-exporting countries. We consider two sets of countries: 10 energy-exporting and 23 commodity-exporting countries over the period 1980–2011. Estimating a panel cointegrating relationship between the real exchange rate and its fundamentals, we provide evidence for the existence of “energy currencies”. Relying on the estimation of panel smooth transition regression (PSTR) models, we show that there exists a certain threshold beyond which the real effective exchange rate of both energy and commodity exporters reacts to oil prices, through the terms-of-trade. More specifically, when oil price variations are low, the real effective exchange rates are not determined by terms-of-trade but by other usual fundamentals. Nevertheless, when the oil market is highly volatile, currencies follow an “oil currency” regime, terms-of-trade becoming an important driver of the real exchange rate.

Les informations statistiques pour le premier semestre 2018 indiquent un essoufflement de la croissance économique mondiale. Ce ralentissement coïncide avec de nombreuses tensions politiques et financières – dont le Brexit, le risque de guerre commerciale entre grandes puissances, les tensions autour du budget italien pour 2019 ou encore celles sur les marchés de change des pays émergents. Dans ce contexte d'incertitudes et de risques baissiers, la trajectoire de croissance ne serait pas remise en cause pour autant. Pourtant il y aura bien un ralentissement du PIB mondial. Après un pic à 3,5 % en 2017, la croissance mondiale diminuerait de 3,4 à 3,1 % entre 2018 et 2020. Le ralentissement sera plus marqué dans les pays industrialisés où la croissance baissera de 0,8 point entre 2017 et 2020. Outre des estimations suggérant un rythme potentiel de croissance plus faible qu'avant la crise de 2008, les économies avancées seront pénalisées par l'augmentation du prix du pétrole tandis que les politiques économiques continueront de soutenir globalement l'activité en 2018 et 2019. C'est le cas de la politique budgétaire américaine fortement expansionniste ces deux années, ainsi que dans la zone euro dans une bien moindre mesure tandis que le Royaume-Uni poursuivra sa politique de consolidation budgétaire. Cette trajectoire de croissance est conditionnée par l'issue des négociations entre le Royaume-Uni et l'Union européenne, le périmètre de la guerre commerciale déjà engagée et la réaction des marchés de la dette souveraine en zone euro. Ces tensions financières et commerciales entraîneraient un ralentissement de l'activité dans les pays émergents en 2019 puisque la croissance passerait de 4,3 % à 4,1 %. Les pays industrialisés seraient faiblement impactés. Ainsi, dans un contexte particulier où les aléas sont orientés à la baisse, la croissance mondiale resterait solide, ce qui permettrait la réduction des taux de chômage sans provoquer le retour de tensions inflationnistes.

Au moment où les prévisions de croissance pour la France de l’OFCE étaient rendues publiques (le 18 octobre, disponibles ici), l’OFCE conviait à un atelier, appelé l’Observatoire Français des Comptes Nationaux, les différentes institutions françaises publiques (Banque de France, Direction Générale du Trésor, Insee) et internationales (Commission européenne, OCDE et FMI) ainsi que les institutions privées françaises ou opérant en France. Le sujet de la journée était la conjoncture française et son environnement international, les prévisions macroéconomiques à l’horizon 2020, les perspectives budgétaires ainsi que des éléments de méthodes ou structurels comme l’écart de production ou les déséquilibres macroéconomiques. Cette rencontre annuelle dont c’est la deuxième édition, a eu lieu mercredi 17 octobre 2018. Au total, 18 instituts pratiquant la prévision à 1 ou 2 ans étaient représentés[1]. Une analyse détaillée de ces prévisions sera publiée prochainement dans un Policy brief de l’OFCE. (Premier paragraphe)

Nous comparons les prévisions de croissance de l'économie française à l'horizon 2020 réalisées entre septembre et début novembre 2018 par 18 organismes (publics et privés, dont l'OFCE). Après avoir augmenté de 2,3 % en 2017, l'activité ralentirait pour l'ensemble des prévision- nistes interrogés à 1,6 % en moyenne en 2018. Il n'y a pas d'accélération prévue à l'horizon de l'exercice de prévision : l'activité progresserait en moyenne de 1,6 % en 2019 et de 1,5 % 2020 (avec 8 instituts sur 12 qui prévoient un ralentissement). Mais les moteurs de la croissance changeraient. En 2017, la croissance avait été tirée par une forte contribution de la demande intérieure hors stocks tandis que le commerce extérieur jouait négativement. L'histoire est toute autre en 2018, le commerce extérieur, par sa contribution positive, contribuerait à compenser partiellement une demande intérieure moins dynamique. En 2019 et 2020, c'est l'inverse. L'accélération de la consommation des ménages permise par l'amélioration des revenus soutiendrait la croissance, tandis que l'investissement resterait solide. L'environnement international serait moindre favorable et les risques sur la croissance, plutôt orientés à la baisse. Si un consensus existe autour de ce scénario central, il masque malgré tout des divergences entre instituts liées notamment aux hypothèses relatives au positionnement de l'économie française dans son cycle, et donc au degré de tensions dans l'économie. Pour tous, l'inflation reste globalement modérée en prévision (entre 1,4 % et 1,9 % en 2020 selon les instituts) mais l'inflation sous-jacente s'accélère, tout en restant inférieure à 2 %, et certains instituts considèrent que des contraintes d'offre existent, notamment sur le marché du travail. Le taux de chômage baisserait de 9,4 % en 2017 à entre 8,1 % pour les plus optimistes à 9,1 % les plus pessimistes en fin de période. La progression des salaires resterait malgré tout contenue sur la période (avec un maximum à 2,6 % en 2020). L'impact positif des réformes passées et en cours sur la croissance du PIB et la compétitivité des entreprises ne ressort pas véritablement des scénarios. La France est sortie de la Procédure de déficit excessif en 2018 et tous les instituts prévoient le respect des règles budgétaires concernant le déficit public, qui resterait en-deçà du seuil des 3 % à l'horizon 2020. Néanmoins, le déficit se dégraderait 2019, du fait de mesures exceptionnelles (remboursement aux entreprises de la taxe sur les dividendes et transformation du CICE en baisses de charges sociales employeurs) et d'une amélioration de la composante conjoncturelle plus limitée qu'en 2017. En 2020, il serait compris entre 2,7 % et 1,6 % du PIB.

Nous comparons les prévisions de croissance de l'économie française à l'horizon 2020 réalisées entre septembre et début novembre 2018 par 18 organismes (publics et privés, dont l'OFCE). Après avoir augmenté de 2,3 % en 2017, l'activité ralentirait pour l'ensemble des prévision- nistes interrogés à 1,6 % en moyenne en 2018. Il n'y a pas d'accélération prévue à l'horizon de l'exercice de prévision : l'activité progresserait en moyenne de 1,6 % en 2019 et de 1,5 % 2020 (avec 8 instituts sur 12 qui prévoient un ralentissement). Mais les moteurs de la croissance changeraient. En 2017, la croissance avait été tirée par une forte contribution de la demande intérieure hors stocks tandis que le commerce extérieur jouait négativement. L'histoire est toute autre en 2018, le commerce extérieur, par sa contribution positive, contribuerait à compenser partiellement une demande intérieure moins dynamique. En 2019 et 2020, c'est l'inverse. L'accélération de la consommation des ménages permise par l'amélioration des revenus soutiendrait la croissance, tandis que l'investissement resterait solide. L'environnement international serait moindre favorable et les risques sur la croissance, plutôt orientés à la baisse. Si un consensus existe autour de ce scénario central, il masque malgré tout des divergences entre instituts liées notamment aux hypothèses relatives au positionnement de l'économie française dans son cycle, et donc au degré de tensions dans l'économie. Pour tous, l'inflation reste globalement modérée en prévision (entre 1,4 % et 1,9 % en 2020 selon les instituts) mais l'inflation sous-jacente s'accélère, tout en restant inférieure à 2 %, et certains instituts considèrent que des contraintes d'offre existent, notamment sur le marché du travail. Le taux de chômage baisserait de 9,4 % en 2017 à entre 8,1 % pour les plus optimistes à 9,1 % les plus pessimistes en fin de période. La progression des salaires resterait malgré tout contenue sur la période (avec un maximum à 2,6 % en 2020). L'impact positif des réformes passées et en cours sur la croissance du PIB et la compétitivité des entreprises ne ressort pas véritablement des scénarios. La France est sortie de la Procédure de déficit excessif en 2018 et tous les instituts prévoient le respect des règles budgétaires concernant le déficit public, qui resterait en-deçà du seuil des 3 % à l'horizon 2020. Néanmoins, le déficit se dégraderait 2019, du fait de mesures exceptionnelles (remboursement aux entreprises de la taxe sur les dividendes et transformation du CICE en baisses de charges sociales employeurs) et d'une amélioration de la composante conjoncturelle plus limitée qu'en 2017. En 2020, il serait compris entre 2,7 % et 1,6 % du PIB.

Suivant