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  • LECLERCQ Christophe (4)
  • DE MOURAT Robin (4)
  • LATOUR Bruno (4)
  • BRILLI Agata (3)
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  • Article (7)
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in City Killers Sous la direction de TOZZI Lucia Publié en 2020-02
CALIBRO design studio
ÓBELO design studio
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Mentre la home page di Airbnb si sta caricando, la casella di ricerca dice Anywhere. La pagina si carica e, nella stessa casella, il testo Prova “Miami” sostituisce Anywhere. Digitate Milano nell’interfaccia, inserite un paio di date – una per l’arrivo, una per la partenza –, aggiungete il numero di compagni di viaggio. Scorrete e selezionate i servizi a cui non rinuncereste mai mentre siete a casa altrove. La piattaforma proporrà le soluzioni disponibili tra i 17.659 annunci su Milano, ma l’interfaccia dirà semplicemente “più di 300 posti per soggiornare”. Se state cercando un appartamento per la Settimana del Design, molto probabilmente l’interfaccia vi avvertirà: Il 203% in più di persone è alla ricerca di una casa a Milano. Arrivi in città in un momento di grande richiesta. Vi consigliamo di sbrigarvi a prenotare.

in 2CO - COmmunicating COmplexity Sous la direction de CECCARELLI Nicolò Publié en 2020
PERONDI Luciano
FERRARI Marco
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This paper discusses a theoretical framework for a research aimed to produce a dictionary of visual analogies used for the explanation of scientific theories, collected both from historical and contemporary sources. The artifacts will be indexed through a set of criteria and tags that will allow to navigate the contents and map correlations across time, scientific domains and types of publication. The archive will grow as an open-ended accumulation of examples, adapting the methodology for the selection and organisation of the analogies based on the new entries. A set of visualisations will be used in order to navigate the archive and make emerging patterns legible. The initial method of classification will be based on the faceted system envisioned by Luca Rosati (Rosati, 2015), in which artifacts are tagged and tags are organised according to a faceted classification. Tags will not be mutually exclusive, but they’ll act like attributes: each entry may have multiple tags, tthe number of which can grow without any limit or predetermined direction.

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De suite d’instructions traduites en langage informatique, les “algorithmes” ont été investis d’un sens bien différent depuis qu’ils sont devenus des compagnons quotidiens de nos activités en ligne, et influencent notre vie économique, sociale et politique. Ils sont aussi de vastes assemblages sociotechniques distribués qui comprennent données, plateformes, calculs, hypothèses, monétisation de l’attention, etc., qui reconfigurent l’innovation dans un large éventail d’activités et concentrent un pouvoir dont il est difficile de saisir la nature. La relation entre la société et ses algorithmes est conflictuelle. Par l’intermédiaire d’une méthodologie interdisciplinaire croisant sciences sociales et design, nous cherchons à nous saisir des erreurs commises au quotidien par les technologies de calcul pour en rendre visible certaines caractéristiques, rendre compte de l’expérience des utilisateurs de services numériques qui sont calculés par les algorithmes, et poser les bases d’une éthique de la négociation avec l’agentivité algorithmique. Nous faisons appel à la figure du glitch pour convoquer un imaginaire alternatif qui rééquilibre la relation entre intelligence humaine et intelligence artificielle.

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This paper is part of a research about the visualization of complex systems. More specifically, it focuses on the emerging need for a narrative approach in the understanding of complex networks. A listener plays a key role in any narration process. Likewise, in every visual representation, the observer has the same role: narrators evoke whereas observers interpret through their imaginary. Why should the designer use a narrative mode of thought? Why should he give to the audience a good story more than a sound argument?. To answer these questions, we present the Map of the Future we designed for Wired Italy.

in Design as problem-making Sous la direction de RAMON Rispoli Publié en 2019-04
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We designers, through our activities and our practices, have tirelessly produced the future. We have seen, foreseen and made others see the future by realising it, by making it real. Other disciplines and practices have imagined or planned the future, but they have still relied on design to produce its iterations at a human, vivid and tangible scale. We have been called to materially weave together the horizon of the “vision” and the plane of “action” by using “projects” as vectors. All modern reflections on design and its methods have mobilised this ability as their very disciplinary justification. They have articulated an idea—or an ideal—of design as a problem- solving activity (Dorst, 2006). A transformative process obtained by jumping into the future and then returning to fix a specific reality. The field of Design has unbound its scope ever since, to the point that, as Colomina and Wigley (2016) noted “[t]here is no longer an outside to the world of design. Design has become the world.” This completely designed world, the one that has been brought back from the future, is today showing its fragilities, its precarity. As Tony Fry (1999) showed, design—the global, modern and solutionist enterprise—triggered some significant “defuturing effects”. It contributed to hindering the world itself from having a future. The contemporary reality, along with its political, social, technological and ecological issues (Latour, 2018), transformed the future—once thought of as an infinitely expandable horizon, spatially and temporally—into an incoming pressure acting on the present (Latour, 2010). Faced with a contraction of possibilities in terms of the availability of time and space, we should question the way in which we are allowing our present reality to be investigated, represented, designed and, ultimately, endowed with a future.

The essay tries to unfold the specificities of some design approaches developed at the SciencesPo médialab. Instead of proposing a generalizable set of methods, this experiential account is a tentative systematization of some techniques that have been tested in the lab. Describing them is like annotating an anthology of thoughts and experiments that revolve around the questions of the ‘public’ and its ‘issues’. The techniques are aimed at exploring the social, technical and political issues, collecting their traces, their descriptions and their partial stories, bringing them into a space where they can be questioned. The different techniques are aligned into two epistemic movements, complementing, supporting and expanding the digital methods traditionally used in the lab. The first movement tries to produce a localized representation of the issue. The second one invites the public to get as close as possible to it.

in Revue Thaêtre Publié en 2018
PRÉVOT Géraldine
FRODON Jean-Michel
RIOUAL Quentin
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Qui êtes-vous ? Comment, dans votre parcours, avez-vous rencontré la question de la recherche-création ? Je ne suis pas une personne, mais un programme pédagogique, créé au sein de Sciences Po par Bruno Latour en 2010. Je m’appelle SPEAP (pour Sciences Po, École des arts politiques). Bien que je n’utilise pas le terme « recherche-création », il me semble que ce qu’il désigne correspond beaucoup à ce que je fais.

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From logs and information left in online spaces to data points self-generated by connected devices, digital traces have become more diffused over the past years, prompting an expansion of Human-Centered Design methods. Along with some bigdata approaches, Digital Methods of research – treating the actual content of digital users’ manifestation on-line (i.e. tweets, Instagram pictures, comments) – offer the opportunity to better understand users through their online activities. This paper investigates how Digital Methods can be repurposed as a full-fledged approach for Human-Centered Design. Grafting on the NATURPRADI project – a research aimed at describing the debate raised by the re-vegetation of the city of Paris by analysing Twitter posts – in the paper we will explain how we have identified and described a set of personas characterized by different approaches towards the evolution of the urban nature issue. The final objective of the paper is to provide a first methodological tool created at the intersection of Digital Methods and Human-Centered Design discussing its opportunities and criticalities: Data-driven Personas.

Publié en 2018 Nom de la conférence ServDes2018 - Service Design Proof of Concept
TASSI Roberta
BRILLI Agata
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From logs and information left in online spaces to data points self-generated by connected devices, digital traces have become more and more diffused over the past years. Along with some big-data approaches, Digital Methods of research - treating the actual content of users’ manifestation online (i.e. tweets, Instagram pictures, comments) - offer the opportunity to better understand people and behaviors through their online activities. This paper investigates how Digital Methods can be repurposed as a full-fledged approach for the Service Design practice, by offering a method to outline service design frameworks from a corpus of web data. This quantitative methods, in combination with the traditional qualitative approaches, leverage the continuous exchange of information that is happening in the digital space and suggest the possibility to automate parts of the data collection and analysis processes in support of service design activities. Grafting on several case studies - we will explain how Digital Methods could be used to identify and describe a set of personas by extracting and interpreting data from their online activities, and we will inquire into the application of the same methodological approach to map other frameworks - such as experience journeys or system maps - that are critical to Service Design.

in Territoires durables : de la recherche à la conception Sous la direction de MARRY Solène Publié en 2018
DE BIASE Alessia
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Le terme « nature urbaine » a constitue pendant longtemps un oxymore dont !'opposition s'est au fur et a mesure attenuee. La nature urbaine est desormais pen;ue comme l'entremelement d'objets aussi bien biolo-giques, chimiques, geologiques, sociaux que technologiques, liant tout a la fois humains et non-humains, espaces urbains et non-urbains. Au sein de ce systeme, un vaste champ d'experimentations s'est developpe et devoile le plus souvent a travers des imaginaires verts : la nature est par exemple souvent utilisee comme une strategie esthetique, donnant !'impression que la ville l'integre (et s'y integre) garantissant ainsi les meilleures conditions de vie, ou encore.comme une solution technique qui diminue l'effet des « ilots de chaleur ». Au-dela de ces premiers objectifs, la nature urbaine a egalement ete utilisee pour masquer une urbanisation capitaliste entrainant des inegalites sociales dues a une « gentrification verte » ou encore, elle a servi a propulser des entreprises technocratiques dans le cas des villes dites intelligentes. Dans ces imaginaires verts -favorisant les discours generaux a propos de l'urbanisme vert developpe aujourd'hui-la nature demeure toujours au-dehors, dans un etat idealise, prete a etre consommee. Et ces imaginaires eclipsent d'autres instances possibles, d'autres dynamiques et d'autres formes de participation publique. La nature est utilisee pour paci-fier, pour « mettre d'accord », car elle represente une valeur consensuelle, meme si en realite ce contexte urbain regorge de natures contestees qui appellent a la participation et a !'engagement du public.

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