Co-auteur
  • CHARDEL Pierre-Antoine (4)
  • PELLE Sophie (2)
  • GIANNI Robert (2)
  • PEARSON John (2)
  • Voir plus
Type de Document
  • Article (7)
  • Partie ou chapitre de livre (7)
  • Livre (5)
  • Communication dans des actes de colloque publiés (1)
  • Voir plus
Publié en 2019-01 Collection Routledge Studies in Innovation, Organization and Technology
GIANNI Robert
PEARSON John
18
vues

0
téléchargements
How can we, as a European and global society, decide on the goals and values that should govern the research and innovation that we expect to address the challenges we face? This is a key question facing those who want innovation to do more than just generate more gadgets and marketable products – those who want innovation to contribute to a just, fair, and sustainable future. This book takes on the problems of thinking, deciding and acting together to implement Responsible Research and Innovation. It does so by addressing four dimensions of what it might mean to innovate responsibly: ethical, political, legal, and economic. The chapters in the book aims to provide critical and constructive conceptual reflection on these dimensions, and to show how they can be used in reshaping the existing innovation system. The book includes chapters by researchers who have taken part in several pioneering projects on Responsible Research and Innovation. The authors provide valuable reflection on key concepts such as responsibility, transparency, co-construction, and value. They use their own experiences of contributing to building Responsible Research and Innovation to address the challenges of integrating these concepts into existing legal, governance, and practical frameworks

in Responsible Research and Innovation Sous la direction de REBER Bernard, REBER Bernard, GIANNI Robert, PEARSON John Publié en 2019
GIANNI Robert
PEARSON John
2
vues

0
téléchargements
Observers of change in the financing of European research have witnessed the introduction of a new notion within the research program H2020, that of responsible research and innovation (RRI). Moreover, this transversal research topic has also reconfigured the Science and Society research program. This new concept has surprised many researchers and potential applicants in general, and those involved in Sciences and Society programs in particular. Evidence of this is provided by the growing number of new requests addressed to researchers working on RRI from research call applicants during the drafting of European projects: there is a growing demand to know more about RRI from applicants. Furthermore, a number of researchers, institutions, museums and civil society organizations have expressed their disappointment with the appearance of the (highly normative) concept of responsibility in this area. However, many of these researchers are sociologists, political scientists, anthropologists or historians. Considering the underdevelopment of ethical sociology (or moral sociology) (Pharo 1985; 1990; 2000; 2004a; 2004b; Reber 2011), for example, the effects of such a reconfiguration can be understood. RRI has emerged suddenly as a new research requirement in the European Research Area, and the concept suffers from being ill-defined. This lack of clarity may make it more of an obstacle than an international comparative advantage for research and innovation if it is not clearly defined and contextually translated. Strictly speaking, RRI is not a concept, unlike moral responsibility, which has had this status for a long period of time. RRI is rather a general research and innovation policy perspective that promotes and continues to be a collection of heterogeneous elements. This first part of the book focuses mainly on ethics. For this reason, we shall concentrate on the problem of ethics in research, in the Ethics Review (ER), as a key (N° 5, as it will be presented; 2012, 2013)1 of the European Commission (EC)’s expression of Responsible Innovation and Research, taking the different understandings of responsibility in moral philosophy into account. Ethics and responsibility are not new in EU-funded projects. ERs have been in place for a long time, which has led to research communities taking ownership of them and integrating them into their work. Compared with ERs, RRI remainsmore enigmatic. One original feature of this chapter is the comparison it provides between RRI and ERs and other responsibilities central to research and innovation projects (parts 1 and 2). Although these two activities encompass convergences and specificities, the focus will mainly be on research. Nevertheless, we will not neglect the fact that both are connected in funded research. Indeed, it is common in presentation requirements for research projects to mention potential spin-offs for the economy, society and innovation. However, beyond ERs themselves, scientific work entails more central responsibilities. Researchers must comply with rules specific to their practices (epistemic norms related to their specific discipline, and common epistemic norms related to scientific work) and ethical norms (e.g. integrity). They are thus entrusted with responsibilities. What is first and foremost expected from them is scientific as well as moral responsibility in the conduct of their work. This implies achieving good quality research that respects both procedures and colleagues. We will then discuss the six different keys used by the EC to depict RRI and the relationships between them and moral and political responsibility (part 3). Indeed, the use of the six keys as a starting point, thus establishing a logical link with responsibility, is not immediately obvious. We will then propose a pluralist cartography of the 10 existing understandings of moral and political responsibility (part 4) and consider different ways to compose them, contributing to different lines of moral innovation (part 5). The conclusion will compare ethics in ER and RRI seeking cross-fertilization as a means to contribute to the development of European scientific policy.

Le problème de l’interdépendance est crucial pour la compréhension du climat, avec ses interactions entre terre, eau et atmosphère, ainsi qu’avec les activités humaines, passées et futures. Or, le concept d’interdépendance exprime deux types de relations, celle de la causalité et celle de la responsabilité. Pour les problèmes de la gestion du climat tel qu’il est compris dans les conférences des parties (COP) comme moyenne statistique, la dépendance causale est impossible à reconstruire précisément à l’heure actuelle, notamment à cause de la complexité. Or, la dépendance ne concerne pas que le domaine de l’être, relevant des sciences naturelles et des sciences sociales et humaines descriptivo-prédictives. Elle relève également du devoir-être et donc des sciences normatives. Ici l’inter-dépendance est beaucoup plus problématique puisqu’elle s’oppose à la liberté. L’article aborde les diverses interdépendances et les solutions politiques proposées comme architecture pour discuter politiquement du climat, notamment les systèmes (N. Luhmann) et la délibération (J. Habermas). Il propose alors une autre solution, celle de la consédiration morale et politique.

37
vues

0
téléchargements
Après la « ṧahada » (témoignage de foi), qui est le premier pilier de l’islam, la conversion impose au nouveau musulman d’obéir aux lois et aux règles inspirées du Qur’ân et de la tradition prophétique (Sunna). Un tel témoignage implique de suivre un ensemble de normes liées à la pratique religieuse qu’un musulman s’engage à respecter. Cette thèse analyse des cas de conversion, et tout en tenant compte des origines familiales et sociales de chaque converti. Elle s’est penchée sur les changements opérés dans la vie de ces nouveaux musulmans, suite à leur acte de conversion. Partant de là, la question posée est de savoir si, chez les convertis, un tel changement engendre des dilemmes avec les normes de vie antérieures, en vigueur dans un pays laïc, et si oui si ces dilemmes sont ou non durables ou intraitables. Ces dilemmes, loin de se limiter à quelques domaines précis (comme le port du voile, les prières etc.), s’étendent à une vision bien plus globale et plus générale, touchant le sujet dans sa complexité - autrement dit dans tous les domaines de son existence. Cette thèse a également pour objectif de préciser la vision portée globalement sur la place des convertis dans ce que l’on nomme « l’islam en France ». Or, cette vision suppose que l’islam est pensé en association avec l’immigration, alors que ces convertis, depuis un certain temps se multiplient en France, en n’étant pas des immigrés. Pour répondre à ces questions, cette thèse aborde la question de la responsabilité morale selon une approche en lien avec la sociologie de la morale et la sociologie des religions, en focalisant l’attention sur le respect des normes islamiques dans un pays laïc comme l’est la France.

11
vues

0
téléchargements

Publié en 2016-12 Collection Responsible innovation and research
44
vues

0
téléchargements
This volume tackles the burden of judgment and the challenges of ethical disagreements, organizes the cohabitation of scientific and ethical argumentations in such a way they find their appropriate place in the political decision. It imagines several forms of agreements and open ways of conflicts resolution very different compared with ones of the majority of political philosophers and political scientists that are macro-social and general. It offers an original contribution to a scrutinized interpretation of the precautionary principle, as structuring the decision in interdisciplinary contexts, to make sure to arrive this time to the “Best of the Worlds”. In its first part, the book goes beyond the epistemic “abstinence” we encounter in a lot of political theories, in the name of the rawlsian burden of judgment or because theses theories are underdetermined regarding the argumentative requirement they claim (Habermas or the theory of the deliberative democracy). This book defends an ethical pluralism, a third way distinct of relativism or monism. This book presents an exhaustive view of the ethical theories and reintroduces them in the dialogical and interdisciplinary theory of argumentation. In the same vein this book presents several forms of ethical pluralism of values. In its second part, it joins theses problems and the ones of decision in situation of uncertainty, the coexistence of sciences in assessment, a distinction of scientific and ethical values that is not a dichotomy, and a confrontation of hypotheses. The author explores in detail how the precautionary principle characterizes different uncertainty sources in the scientific work and proposes to lean on it to distribute disciplines assessing technologies according to the distinction between entre experts and scientists, and to ensure an epistemic pluralism (inter-disciplinary and intra-disciplinary). Finally, this study defends a new meta-ethical pluralist theory at the same level as the power of the actual controversial technologies and environmental challenges. From this point of view it answers some limitations of Hans Jonas ethics, because it thinks about the ethical pluralism, the development of a public policy and more nuanced models of justification.

14
vues

0
téléchargements
L’éthique de l’environnement est dépendante de l’éthique technologique. Il faut donc penser la technique avec toutes ses virtualités et pas simplement comme un instrument. L’approche heideggérienne de la technique évite cette réduction. Rapprocher du langage, elle en interroge l’essence. Avec la technique moderne cette essence ne se déploie pas en production mais en provocation par laquelle la nature est mise en demeure de livrer une énergie qui puisse être extraite pour une utilisation maximale et aux moindres frais. La voie de la production de la poésie reste pourtant ouverte. Cet article relit ce texte difficile, en indique certaines limites et en exploite la richesse pour le débat contemporain croisant éthique de l’environnement et des techniques.

Publié en 2016-06 Collection Responsible Research and Innovation : 3
PELLE Sophie
16
vues

0
téléchargements
The scientific and technological upheavals of the 20th Century and the questions and difficulties that went along with them (climate change, nuclear energy, GMO, etc.) have increased the necessity of thinking about and formalizing technoscientific progress and its consequences. Expert evaluations and ethics committees today cannot be the only legitimate sources for understanding the social acceptability and desirability of this progress. Responsibility must be shared out on a wider scale, as much in society as in the process of research and innovation projects. This book presents the main works of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) from a moral responsibility point of view, for which it calls upon no fewer than 10 understandings to bring out those which are positive and to support an interpretive and combinatory pluralism. In this sense, it demonstrates moral innovation. It analyzes numerous cases and proposes perspectives that are rarely discussed in this emerging field (current practices of ethical evaluation, concerns of the integrity of research, means for participatory technological evaluation, etc.). It contributes to the pledges of RRI, which largely remains theoretically undetermined even though it reorganizes the relationships between science, innovation and society. To see more: http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1848219156.html

in Revue de métaphysique et de morale Publié en 2016-03
26
vues

26
téléchargements
Dès l'Antiquité, certains philosophes attribuaient aux climats une responsabilité causale sur les qualités morales des peuples. Dans un mouvement inverse, le climat est devenu global et partagé. Il enjoint les États à prendre leurs responsabilités pour veiller sur sa température globale moyenne. L'article présente le système climatique, son caractère composite et montre qu'on est bien loin d'en comprendre les interactions et les échanges d'énergie, d'eau et de carbone. Le réchauffement climatique repose sur la mesure de la température moyenne de toutes les températures locales en tous les points du globe. Elle ne correspond pas à une réalité physique immédiate, locale et perceptible, mais elle est une grandeur statistique. Avec la seule considération des effets des activités humaines créant un forçage externe brutal sur le système climatique on ouvre déjà un espace où plusieurs systèmes de responsabilités possibles peuvent s'entremêler ou s'ajuster. Le texte traite tour à tour du cadre normatif de Responsabilités communes mais différenciées (modes d'attribution de la production des gaz à effet de serre (GES), critères d'entrée dans la liste des États supportant principalement l'effort contre le réchauffement climatique, et mécanismes de participation à cette lutte), du lien conceptuel à etablir entre types de justice pour l'atténuation des GES (distributive) et l'adaptation (correctrice) grâce à une responsabilité visant l'égalité des chances, et du problème de différents équilibres dans le partage des responsabilités dans le cas de responsabilités collectives et complexes. Ce problème est traité par la considération des théories éthiques d'arrièreplan, des conceptions et des fonctions de la responsabilité.

in Responsibility and Freedom Publié en 2016-03
7
vues

0
téléchargements

Suivant