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in Review of International Political Economy Publication date 2020-10
LEBARON Genevieve
MÜGGE Daniel
BEST Jacqueline
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Which blind spots shape scholarship in International Political Economy (IPE)? That question animates the contributions to a double special issue—one in the Review of International Political Economy, and a companion one in New Political Economy. The global financial crisis had seemed to vindicate broad-ranging IPE perspectives at the expense of narrow economics theories. Yet the tumultuous decade since then has confronted IPE scholars with rapidly-shifting global dynamics, many of which had remained underappreciated. We use the Blind Spots moniker in an attempt to push the topics covered here higher up the scholarly agenda—issues that range from institutionalized racism and misogyny to the rise of big tech, intensifying corporate power, expertise-dynamics in global governance, assetization, and climate change. Gendered and racial inequalities as blind spots have a particular charge. There has been a self-reinforcing correspondence between topics that have counted as important, people to whom they matter personally, and the latter’s ability to build careers on them. In that sense, our mission is not only to highlight collective blind spots that may dull IPE’s capacity to theorize the current moment. It is also a normative one—a form of disciplinary housekeeping to help correct both intellectual and professional entrenched biases.

in Review of International Political Economy Edited by LEBARON Genevieve, HAY Colin, BEST Jacqueline, MÜGGE Daniel Publication date 2020-10
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Which blind spots shape scholarship in International Political Economy (IPE)? That question animates the contributions to a double special issue—one in the Review of International Political Economy, and a companion one in New Political Economy. The global financial crisis had seemed to vindicate broad-ranging IPE perspectives at the expense of narrow economics theories. Yet the tumultuous decade since then has confronted IPE scholars with rapidly-shifting global dynamics, many of which had remained underappreciated. We use the Blind Spots moniker in an attempt to push the topics covered here higher up the scholarly agenda—issues that range from institutionalized racism and misogyny to the rise of big tech, intensifying corporate power, expertise-dynamics in global governance, assetization, and climate change. Gendered and racial inequalities as blind spots have a particular charge. There has been a self-reinforcing correspondence between topics that have counted as important, people to whom they matter personally, and the latter’s ability to build careers on them. In that sense, our mission is not only to highlight collective blind spots that may dull IPE’s capacity to theorize the current moment. It is also a normative one—a form of disciplinary housekeeping to help correct both intellectual and professional entrenched biases.

in The Drinks Business Publication date 2020-09
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In the third of a series exploring the history, market performance and most recent vintages of some of Bordeaux’s leading estates, Colin Hay uses the opportunity afforded by a rare vertical tasting at the château to look at the striking progression of the Pessac-Léognan classed growth Château Haut Bailly over the past two decades.

A factor that may account for the largely unanticipated victory of Brexit in 2016 is the difference in engagement, mobilization, and, ultimately, turnout between those for whom the question of Brexit was a valence issue (a dry and almost technical question of determining the policies by which uncontroversial shared ends can be achieved) and those for whom it was a positional issue (a question of raw, almost visceral, political preference). The declining appeal of valence politics may reveal a phenomenon that goes beyond Brexit and Britain: a change in the nature and character of contemporary electoral competition that may help to explain the newly resurgent populism characteristic of Western liberal democracies.

in Journal of European Integration Publication date 2020-08
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Taking stock of the numerous crises that have confronted Europe in the last decade, this special issue investigates the relationship between crisis and the politicisation of the process of European integration. It draws attention in so doing to the epistemic construction of crises. In this conceptual overview, we discuss first, how crises are framed and reframed in relation to the constitutive elements of a political community. Second, we explore the extent to which, and how, the emergence of different understandings of crisis and the ensuing frame competition between them contribute to such politicisation. By elucidating the link between the politics of a now seemingly permanent crisis in Europe and the politicisation of European integration, this introduction sets the framework informing all of the articles in this special issue.

in The Drinks Business Publication date 2020-07
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The 2019 en primeur campaign is regarded as a surprising success. But its unique and exceptional character and its comparative brevity (with, at its height, 20 or 30 wines released each day) have posed significant problems for producers of Sauternes and Barsac. The market was looking elsewhere when these wines were released and even fewer cases than usual have been sold, writes Colin Hay.

in The Drinks Business Publication date 2020-07
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Much of the early talk about Bordeaux 2019 suggested that, rather like 2014, this was going to turn out to be a northern Medoc vintage. Expectations for Saint-Estèphe were then particularly high, writes Colin Hay.

in The Drinks Business Publication date 2020-07
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Overall, 2019 is a relatively homogenous vintage – with no great qualitative difference between left and right bank nor really between appellations. Yet if there is a left-bank appellation that is more heterogeneous than the others in 2019 it is Margaux.

in The Drinks Business Publication date 2020-07
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Pauillac in 2019 is fantastic and for such a large appellation it is remarkably homogenous in quality. That qualitative homogeneity does not in any sense mask the considerable range of stylistic diversity – if anything it accentuates it. But what is deeply impressive is that no Pauillac classed growth that I tasted en primeur lacked either appellation or terroir typicity.

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Quite a lot has already been written about the white wines of Bordeaux in 2019. And I am not sure that I agree with all of it. For me they represent something of a mixed bag. And, perhaps alarmingly, the issue here is linked clearly to climate change. The trouble is that, year after year and in an accelerating way, these wines have a tendency to become richer, fuller, and higher in alcohol, writes Colin Hay.

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