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  • VENTURINI Tommaso (15)
  • GIRARD Paul (12)
  • OOGHE Benjamin (12)
  • PLIQUE Guillaume (5)
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  • Site Web (8)
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Publié en 2006
JACOMY Mathieu
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in Information and Communication Technologies Publié en 2006
PFAËNDER Fabien
JACOMY Mathieu
FOUETILLOU Guillaume
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This paper presents two different perspectives of the web: a global one that corresponds to the classical approach of search engines and a the local one that we propose as an alternative approach. The search engines perform their indexation operation on the whole web in an automatic way and display their results according to it by proposing a perfectible visualization. We will review the usability of these visualizations while examining the way search engines build their hierarchies. That leads us to reconsider the notion of context and the way models of the web influence our vision of it to finally propose a new model strongly related to its perception through alternative visualizations.

in Le Monde Publié en 2012-02-03
OOGHE Benjamin
LAROUSSERIE David
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in Réseaux Publié en 2010
DIMINESCU Dana
RENAULT Matthieu
JACOMY Mathieu
D'IRIBARNE Christophe
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Cet article se propose d'engager une réflexion sur le web matrimonial des migrants (WMM) en tant que forme inédite de commerce ethnique posant l'égalité « faire du commerce » = « faire du réseau » (et non plus s'appuyer sur des réseaux ethniques préexistants). Le WMM est fondée sur une économie du profilage singulière puisque dépendante d'une ethnicisation des profils (et donc des utilisateurs): « faire du réseau » = « ethniciser ». Enfin, le WMM implique mobilité et migrations (avec des différences capitales en terme de genre): « faire du réseau » = « naviguer, bouger, migrer ».

In the last few years, a spirit has been haunting our academic and popular culture — the spirit of networks. Throughout social as well as natural sciences, more and more phenomena have come to be conceived as networks. Telecommunication networks, neural networks, social networks, epigenetic networks, ecological and economic networks , the very fabric of our existence seems to be made of lines and dots. More recently, the interest for graphs overflowed from science to popular culture and images of networks started to appear everywhere. They decorate buildings and objects; they are printed on t-shirts and furniture; they colonize the desktop of our computers and the walls of our airports. Networks have become the emblem of modernity, a way to show and tell our world’s complexity. Our growing fascination for networks is not unjustified. Networks are powerful conceptual tools, encapsulating in a single object multiple affordances for computation (networks as graphs), visualization (networks as maps) and manipulation of data (networks as interfaces).

Cet article reprend une recherche de Luc Boltanski sur les enseignants de l’IEP de Paris. Dans cette recherche, Boltanski s’appuie sur une représentation tabulaire des champs sociaux pour montrer que la classe dominante se caractérise avant tout par sa multipositionnalité, c’est-à-dire par la tendance de ses membres à occuper plusieurs positions dans plusieurs champs. En remplaçant le tableau de Boltanski par un graphe d’individus et d’institutions, nous discuterons les caractéristiques et les avantages d’une sociologie de réseaux hétérogènes.

in Datafied Society: Social Research in the Age of Big Data. Publié en 2017-02-25
BOUNEGRU Liliana
GRAY Jonathan
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No doubt, networks have become indispensable mathematical tools in many aspects of life in the twenty first century. They allow us to calculate all kinds of relational metrics and to quantify the properties of their nodes, clusters and global structures. These modes of calculation are becoming increasingly prevalent in an age of digital data. But networks are more than formal analytical tools. They are also powerful metaphors of our collective life, with all of its complexity and its many dependencies. This is why, among the various strategies of data visualization, networks seem to have assumed a paradigmatic position, spreading to the most different disciplines and colonizing sometimes as mere decoration a growing number of digital and non-digital objects. Contemplating the visual representation of a network, we don’t (always) need to compute its mathematical properties to appreciate its heuristic value – as anyone who has ever used a transportation plan knows well. Networks are extraordinary calculating devices, but they are also maps, instruments of navigation and representation. Not only do they guide our steps through the territories that they represent, but they also invite our imagination to see and explore the world in different ways. [First paragraph]

in Digital Journalism Publié en 2016-06-20
BOUNEGRU Liliana
GRAY Jonathan
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Networks have become the de facto diagram of the Big Data age (try searching Google Images for [big data AND visualisation] and see). The concept of networks has become central to many fields of human inquiry and is said to revolutionise everything from medicine to markets to military intelligence. While the mathematical and analytical capabilities of networks have been extensively studied over the years, in this article we argue that the storytelling affordances of networks have been comparatively neglected. In order to address this we use multimodal analysis to examine the stories that networks evoke in a series of journalism articles. We develop a protocol by means of which narrative meanings can be construed from network imagery and the context in which it is embedded, and discuss five different kinds of narrative readings of networks, illustrated with analyses of examples from journalism. Finally, to support further research in this area, we discuss methodological issues that we encountered and suggest directions for future study to advance and broaden research around this defining aspect of visual culture after the digital turn.

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