Co-auteur
  • DIECKHOFF Alain (9)
  • VERNIERS Gilles (8)
  • GAYER Laurent (7)
  • BELORGEY Nicolas (5)
  • Voir plus
Type de Document
  • Partie ou chapitre de livre (80)
  • Article (72)
  • Livre (39)
  • Contribution à un site web (28)
  • Voir plus
Publié en 2021-07-16 Collection Heidelberg Papers In South Asian and Comparative Politics : 80
BELORGEY Nicolas
0
vues

0
téléchargements
In 2009, India embarked on a scheme for the biometric identification of its people. This project was conceived by IT companies based in Bengaluru. The programme’s main architect, Nandan Nilekani, was in fact the head of one of these firms. The idea behind the project was to use digital technology – and the data it enables to collect – for economic ends. But to register the entire Indian population, the State had to be persuaded to be involved in the project, later named as "Aadhaar". The rationale that secured the government’s engagement was financial: using Aadhaar would help disburse aid to the poor while minimising the "leakages" caused by corruption and duplicates among beneficiaries. Yet, possessing an Aadhaar number gradually became necessary for a number of other things, too, including tax payment. When approached to rule on this matter, the Supreme Court dragged its feet and did not seek to decisively protect people’s privacy. As for the avowed aim of the scheme itself, Aadhaar did not improve the quality of the services rendered to the poor – far from it – and its economic impact, too, remains to be proven, even if operators who believe that "data is the new oil" consider benefits in a long term perspective.

In 2009, India embarked on a scheme for the biometric identification of its people. The idea behind the project was to use digital technology—and the data collection it enables—for economic ends. But to register the entire Indian population, the state had to be persuaded to be involved in the project, later named “Aadhaar”. What have been the implications of this programme, in terms of privacy in particular? How has the population reacted and are the data protected? Interview with Christophe Jaffrelot and Nicolas Belorgey, authors of the 251st Etude du CERI entitled, L’identification biométrique de 1,3 milliard d’Indiens. Milieux d’affaires, Etat et société civile recently translated. The study is available in English under the title Identifying 1.3 Billion Indians Biometrically. Corporate World, State, and Civil Society (Heidelberg Papers in South Asian and Comparative Studies No. 80). Interview with the two authors by Corinne Deloy.

in Le Monde diplomatique Publié en 2021-06-01
19
vues

0
téléchargements
Jusqu’à début avril, la presse mondiale saluait le tour de force du premier ministre indien et sa « diplomatie du vaccin », apte à contrer la Chine. Aujourd’hui, le Covid-19 fait d’autant plus de ravages que le pays manque de vaccins, de médicaments, d’oxygène. Et, pour la première fois depuis 2014, M. Narendra Modi est en perte de vitesse.

26
vues

0
téléchargements
[Résumé du dossier] Peu de pays possèdent un pouvoir d’attraction aussi fort que l’Inde, ce pays monde de 3,2 millions de km2. Babel linguistique et chaudron religieux, où la plus grande richesse côtoie la plus grande misère. Devenue, en moins d’une génération, la cinquième puissance économique du monde devant la France, le géant souffre pourtant de nombreux maux : taux de pauvreté toujours très élevé, industrie sous-développée, inégalités criantes, et, depuis peu, fragilisation du système politique tel qu’établit en 1947. Dans ce numéro, Questions internationales aborde les principaux enjeux actuels auxquels fait face l’Inde, qu’ils soient d’ordre économique, politique, diplomatique, militaire ou sociétal. Quels sont les ressorts du hard power and du soft power indien ? Quelles relations l’Inde noue-t-elle avec ses voisins asiatiques ? L’Inde est-elle toujours « la plus grande démocratie du monde », malgré les conflits inter-ethniques toujours plus virulents et la persistance d’inégalités criantes ?

in Institut Montaigne Publié en 2021-04-27
43
vues

0
téléchargements
In India, daily cases of infection due to Covid-19 have passed a record number of 350 000, the pandemic killing officially about 2,500 people every day, including young men and women. This humanitarian disaster is partly due to the way the Covid-19 virus has mutated: the new "Indian variant" appears to be both more contagious and more deadly. But this catastrophe is also man-made and reflects trends which had already been pointed out during the first wave, one year ago. On March 31, 2020, I had called the Covid-19 pandemic a "global time bomb". Issues I highlighted then need to be revisited again. The way the government of India dealt with the pandemic reflects three dimensions of India’s dysfunctional governance that were there before: the present crisis, like an acid test, accentuates existing features. It is revealing of the wandering of decision-makers and the grasp of Hindu nationalism over India’s politics and society, it shows that for the country’s rulers power can be pursued at any cost and that no institution can resist them, and finally, it highlights the crisis of federalism.

La notion d’Indo-Pacifique est en passe de structurer le discours géostratégique non seulement de nombreux pays de la région (à commencer par le Japon – son berceau originel – et l’Australie), mais aussi de plusieurs pays occidentaux. Les Etats-Unis ont déjà rebaptisé leur United States Pacific Command en United States Indo-Pacific Command. En Europe, la France a été l’un des premiers pays de l’UE à faire de l’Indo-Pacifique une de ses priorités géopolitiques, comme en a témoigné le discours d’Emmanuel Macron du 2 mai 2018 à Garden Island (Sydney). Depuis, l’Allemagne a formulé sa propre vision de la zone en octobre 2020, suivie peu après par les Pays Bas. A cette liste de pays européens, il faut ajouter le Royaume-Uni qui cherche lui aussi à se tourner vers l’Asie, notamment pour amortir les conséquences du Brexit.

23
vues

0
téléchargements
Depuis l’automne dernier, l’Inde est secouée par des manifestations d’agriculteurs qui contestent vivement l’adoption, en septembre 2020, de trois lois pensées comme un tournant vers la libéralisation du secteur agricole du pays et perçues comme la fin des vieilles réglementations dans le cadre desquelles un prix minimal était garanti par l’État aux agriculteurs sur certaines denrées de base. Au-delà des purs enjeux pour le secteur, cette protestation, sa durée et son ampleur posent la question d’un mouvement politique plus large, aux possibles conséquences à l’international. Christophe Jaffrelot, directeur de recherche au Centre de recherches internationales (CERI) de Sciences Po Paris et au CNRS, a pour nous répondu à trois questions ; la leçon qu’il en tire est claire : cette agitation, si elle est davantage sociale que politique, est aussi "dirigée contre la classe dirigeante indienne au sens large".

in Illiberalism Studies Program Publié en 2021-02-24
45
vues

0
téléchargements
An interview with Christophe Jaffrelot on India’s growing national-populism, February 8, 2021. .

in India Exclusion Report 2019–2020 Publié en 2021-02-08
LALIWALA Sharik
THAKKA Priyal
DESAI Abida
22
vues

0
téléchargements
[...] This chapter is organized into five sections. First, we provide a history of Juhapura, coeval with incidents of large-scale anti-Muslim violence in postcolonial Ahmedabad, which resulted in segregated living zones. We particularly examine the development of Juhapura in light of State-enforced discriminatory laws such as the Disturbed Areas Act 1991 and the post-2002 migration of middle-class and wealthy Muslims to the ghetto. In the second section, we show how elite migration to Juhapura has allowed its residents to negotiate with the state and bring limited improvements to the delivery of public services, despite the majoritarian character par excellence of the State in Gujarat. However, as we show in the third section, the arrival of rich, educated Muslims in Juhapura has not necessarily resulted in the emancipation of poor, lower-caste Muslims. Here, we focus on the creation of class and sect-specific ‘citadels’, representing fractured solidarities within Juhapura, to highlight the non-linear nature of citizenship in Juhapura. Lower-class Muslim women have crucially resisted elite and orthodox tendencies within Juhapura, signifying a merger, even if limited, of class, caste and gender in Juhapura. Then, we suggest a few recommendations to improve the state of religious fragmentation within the society of Ahmedabad as well as to enhance Juhapura’s public infrastructure and political representation. Finally, after summarizing our findings, we conclude that the current state of affairs in Juhapura is a result of the post-1990 transformation in the nature of the State in Gujarat from a de facto Hindu Rashtra (Hindu Nation) towards a de jure one, with legal mechanisms facilitating discrimination against Muslims. In the post-2014 environment of nation-wide hegemony of Hindutva politics, this legally sanctioned form of Hindu Rashtra—‘the Gujarat Model’—has been replicated across India, alongside deepening of the Hindutva ideology. [...]

128
vues

0
téléchargements
Il y a cinq ans encore, l'Inde était saluée par le Fonds monétaire international (FMI) comme un des moteurs de la croissance mondiale, avec un taux qui dépassait 7% - et qui la plaçait dans le trio de tête. Entre 2016 et 2019, l'érosion constante de son dynamisme économique avait fait tomber le taux de croissance à 4,2%. La crise de la Covid-19 a précipité celle de l'économie indienne, dont le taux de croissance, devenu négatif, devrait s'établir à -10% en 2020, ce qui la placerait, d'après le FMI, au 164e rang mondial (sur les 193 Etats pris en compte). Au-delà des aspects conjoncturels de cet accès de faiblesse, l'économie indienne est "plombée" par des facteurs structurels qui finissent par alimenter les doutes des observateurs les plus avertis...

Suivant