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  • GUILD Elspeth (21)
  • GUITTET Emmanuel-Pierre (10)
  • BONELLI Laurent (9)
  • WALKER Robert (7)
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  • Article (68)
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"Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences (PARISS)" is a bi-annual journal published by Brill publishers that seeks to promote a plurality of ways of thinking, researching and writing and to give access to contemporary authors in the social sciences coming also from non-English-speaking countries. The journal covers Social Sciences, International Relations, Global Studies, Sociology & Anthropology, Transdisciplinary approaches, Art and Humanities. The four coeditors, Tugba Basaran, Monique J. Beerli, Didier Bigo, and Emma Mc Cluskey answer our questions about the journal and its aims.

in Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences (PARISS) Publication date 2020-07-21
MC CLUSKEY Emma
BASARAN Tugba
24
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Through a critical engagement with substantive and stylistic guidelines dictated by dominant journals in the social sciences, this article enquires on what it means to write like a social scientist in the twenty-first century. Academic production and diffusion now regularly take place beyond and across national borders, with English often standing in as the lingua franca of these global exchanges. Though just one effect of this restructuration, academic journals have become more transnational in scope with regards to the authors whose work they publish and the audiences whose readership they seek to attract. However, while one could expect the “globalization” of the social sciences to lead to the transnational circulation of national disciplinary traditions and perhaps multiple manifestations of cultural hybridization, we are instead witnessing the imposition of a strangely singular and harmonized mode of doing the social sciences. Paradoxically, standards of how long a scientific article should be or how one should fashion an argument are so familiar and intimately known, yet curiously opaque and of unknown origins. In interrogating the historical-contextual origins of conventions that so strongly shape the world of academic publishing and, dare we say, reasoning, we raise questions about the conditions of the present and the naturalization of standards on how to write a scientific article. As a consequence of this exploration, we propose alternatives guidelines that a new journal such as ours has to present to its anticipated authors and readers.

in Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences (PARISS) Publication date 2020-07-21
MC CLUSKEY Emma
BASARAN Tugba
13
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[...] "Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences (PARISS)" seeks to encourage transversal social inquires so as to support flows rather than academic enclosures and to cut across conventional planes of scholarship. Here, as has previously been noted, “[t]he notion of transversal lines is intended to articulate the distinctive contributions of various forms of knowledge, depending on the specific phenomena, trajectories and problems that are in question.” By doing so, "PARISS" seeks to reinvigorate scholarly engagements untroubled by canonic approaches and to provide a space for outstanding scholarship, marginalized elsewhere due to academic conventions. Drawing transversal lines requires not only a different way of thinking, but different intellectual practices – it requires intellectual collaborations between fragmented fields of knowledge. This includes collaborations between and among disciplines, but also linguistic collaborations that go beyond the anglophone canon, allowing the creation of novel, innovative and critical intellectual spaces. As such, we would like pariss to become a comitium, an open meeting space for scholars of various backgrounds seeking to draw transversal lines.

in Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences (PARISS) Publication date 2020-07-21
DEZALAY Yves
COHEN Antonin
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This interview with Yves Dezalay focuses on his research strategy and the link between a Bourdieusian approach and a multi-sited ethnography. Yves Dezalay explains his strategy of doing interviews with the lawyers who are part of their “state nobilities”, in what order to interview them, with whom to begin and for what reasons. He warned about the dangers of trying to reproduce the ways of questioning elite actors as if they were important individuals without taking into account more socio genetic perspectives and especially the prosopography of the group and their respective positions. Collective biographies analysing the relations between the actors are the most important part of the research.

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Faced with a rapid, partially invisible pandemic, a majority of countries have so far chosen emergency measures based on territorial zoning, which does not discriminate between the sick and the healthy. Now, digital contact tracing is being presented to us as the ideal way to differentiate between these two groups of people. In reality, it instead adds another political problem, that of an enlarged surveillance apparatus, without solving the underlying one: the lack of an effective public health strategy.

in International Journal of Migration and Border Studies Publication date 2020-05-11
EWERT Lina
KUŞKONMAZ Elif Mendos
16
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This article aims to discuss the interoperability controversy in the EU that followed the 2015 Paris attacks. Supported by visual methods, it analyses the historical developments of the databases that aim at facilitating migration and crime control in the Area of Justice and Home Affairs (JHA). In so doing, it seeks to trace the paradox on freedom, technology, and surveillance since the Schengen area was established in the 90s, whereby the discourse on the freedom of movement (both as the rights of citizens and migrants crossing borders) has been reframed by the security reasoning using technological solutions. It critiques the technical framework within which the interoperability plans have been framed.

Smart borders, intelligent systems of filtering travelers by detecting suspects of crime and terrorism through interoperable national data bases and regional agreements are proliferating. In the European Union it began with the Schengen Information System. SIS-VISEURODAC, EES, ETIAS, ECRIS are acronyms for different realizations and projects of Entry and Exit Systems, of pre-frontiers zone, of policy checks regarding police, immigration and asylum, tracing people and scoring the degree to which they can be suspected to be illegal or criminal. Security stakes have been technologized. This is a profound reconfiguration of the different regional fields of security professionals with the emergence of a transnational guild regrouping data analysts, civil engineers on IT systems and border controls, changing de facto who is deciding the limits between security and insecurity, risk and fate. This importance of the online -virtual regarding the off-line- actual is affecting freedom and criminal justice.

in Charting Transnational Fields. Methodology for a Political Sociology of Knowledge Edited by SCHMIDT-WELLENBURG Christian, BERNHARD Stefan Publication date 2020-05
45
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This paper addresses the possibility of using Bourdieusian concepts like fields of power, professional dispositions, and cultural habitus to explore transnational practices. To resolve questions of transnational field(s) we need to examine what constitutes transnational practices. I suggest reading ‘transnational’ as a signifier that is not limited to practices reserved for non-state actors and I show that transnational practices are constitutive of the field of state formation. It is here that the Bourdieusian approach to the state, not as an actor, but as a field, is central. It allows to analyse stateness today and its relatively new assemblage with private actors, with digital stakes, and with a modification of the use of force towards a use of surveillance and control at a distance. My research on the Five Eyes coalition of SIGINT(Signals Intelligence)-internet intelligence services and its members’ co-operation for the large-scale interception of data obliges us to rethink the nature of national security today and it gives empirical ground to the call to abandon the false dualism between territory and digital space in the exercise of state power, and suggests an alternative way of thinking national and transnational practices together, as one category of practice only.

L’information numérique est à l’évidence devenue un enjeu et un objet central du travail des services de renseignement. La plupart d’entre eux intègrent désormais dans leur activité routinière le recueil de données personnelles venant de multiples secteurs de la vie sociale d’un individu et de ses relations, ainsi que leur analyse. Mais ils le font de manière diverse selon leur ancienneté dans le métier, leurs capacités en termes de personnel, de moyens financiers et technologiques, et surtout selon leurs visions de ce qu’est l’activité de renseignement. À partir de l’étude des principaux services de neuf pays occidentaux (États-Unis, Grande-Bretagne, Canada, Australie, Nouvelle-Zélande, France, Allemagne, Espagne et Suède), cet article se propose de construire rigoureusement un espace transnational du renseignement. La mise en relation des positions et des discours de ces acteurs avec leurs pratiques et le sens qu’ils leur donnent permet de comprendre les homologies ou, au contraire, les différences irréductibles qui structurent ensuite les coopérations et les types d’échange de données.

in International Studies Perspectives Publication date 2019-11
TANCZER Leonie Maria
DEIBERT Ronald
FRANKLIN Marianne
MELGAÇO Lucas
LYON David
KAZANSKY Becky
MILAN Stefania
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Internet et les technologies digitales sont devenus indispensables dans le milieu universitaire. Un monde sans e-mails, moteurs de recherche et bases de données en ligne est pratiquement impensable. Cependant, dans cette ère de dépendance digitale, le milieu universitaire ne semble pas préoccupé par les nombreux défis que posent les technologies digitales dans les professions universitaires. Cette tribune a été inspirée par le débat d'une table ronde lors de la Convention annuelle de l'Association d’études internationales de 2017, où un grand nombre d'auteurs dans l'assemblée ont convenu de la nécessité de lancer un débat critique sur les effets de la surveillance et des méthodes de censure en ligne sur le savoir universitaire. Cette tribune formule cinq critiques à l'encontre de nos infrastructures numérisées, des institutions pilotées par les données, des entreprises mercenaires, des plateformes universitaires abusives et des pratiques en ligne non sécurisées. L'ensemble des articles de cette collection unique contribue à la recherche sur la liberté universitaire et aide à encadrer l'analyse du secteur néolibéral de l'enseignement supérieur, les pratiques de surveillance rencontrées par les étudiants et le personnel et la nécessité grandissante d'améliorer notre «hygiène digitale».

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