Co-auteur
  • CREEL Jérôme (21)
  • GAFFARD Jean-Luc (18)
  • FITOUSSI Jean-Paul (15)
  • HUBERT Paul (8)
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Type de Document
  • Article (42)
  • Working paper (31)
  • Partie ou chapitre de livre (6)
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in Revue de l'OFCE Publié en 2009-07
GAFFARD Jean-Luc
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L’importance et la gravité de la crise financière largement due à des mécanismes financiers pervers ne sauraient occulter la dimension réelle des désordres actuels. Le choc violent de répartition des revenus personnels qui est allé de pair avec l’émergence de la nouvelle économie a vraisemblablement créé les conditions d’une chute de la demande et donc de la production et de l’emploi qui a été masquée un temps par un endettement des ménages pauvres difficilement soutenable.

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Il presente articolo lega la drastica e diffusa diminuzione dell’investimento pubblico al «nuovo consenso» che in economia si è imposto a partire dagli anni ottanta, centrato sull’efficienza dei mercati e su un ruolo limitato della politica economica. Il consenso ha influito in particolare sulle politiche condotte in Europa, dove ha anche plasmato le istituzioni per la governance economica. La crisi del consenso consente di riflettere su riforme che permettano alla politica economica di riprendere il ruolo di motore dello sviluppo di lungo periodo che aveva nel secondo dopoguerra. Si propone una «regola d’oro aumentata» di bilancio che consenta ai governi e alle istituzioni europee di coordinarsi su investimenti (materiali e immateriali) forieri di sviluppo economico a lungo termine. Tale regola consentirebbe di recuperare una «politica industriale» europea, troppo a lungo assente, e di riaffermare la democraticità del processo decisionale.

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This paper presents a sequential model suited to analyze transitions between equilibria. Disequilibrium dynamics are obtained from a standard monopolistic competition model, by introducing a sequential structure and reasonable hypotheses about technology, finance constraints, expectation formation, and the wage setting mechanism. The response to shocks crucially depends on the institutional features of the economy, and on the monetary policy stance. In particular, some degree of wage stickiness proves necessary to avoid explosive paths. This feature of the model makes it a good candidate for the reappraisal of Keynes’ arguments on wages and unemployment.

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The Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) institutions are consistent with a New Consensus that emerged in the 1980s, limiting the role for macroeconomic policy to short term stabilizations by means of rules. I will argue that the policy inertia induced by the Consensus may have played a role in the disappointing performance of EMU economies even before the crisis. The crisis of the Consensus, and the debate on secular stagnation, proved that Keynesian and possibly persistent excesses of savings over investment may hamper growth. This has put fiscal policy back to the center of the scene, and given the General Theory, at eighty, a second youth. I will argue therefore that the EMU fiscal rule should be amended to allow semi-permanent negative government savings. I will finally argue that a modified Golden Rule may serve this objective, and allow EU-wide policy coordination. This seems the only reasonable reform with some chances of being adopted by the EU divided policy makers.

By means of a macroeconomic model with an agent-based household sector and a stockflow consistent structure, we analyse the im-pact of rising income inequality on the likelihood of a crisis for different institutional settings. In particular, we study how economic crises emerge in the presence of different credit conditions and policy reactions to rising income disparities. Our simulations show the relevance of the degree of financialisation of an economy. In fact, when inequality grows, a Scylla and Charybdis kind of dilemma seems to arise: on the one hand, low credit availability implies a drop in aggregate demand and output; on the other hand, relaxed credit constraints and a higher willingness to lend result in greater financial instability and a debt-driven boom and bust cycle. We also point out that policy reactions play a key role: a real structural reform that tackles inequality, by means of a more progressive tax system, actually compensates for the rise in income disparities thereby stabilising the economy. Results also show that this is a better solution compared to a stronger fiscalpolicy reaction, which, instead, only leads to a larger duration of the boom and bust cycle.

This paper aims at giving a theoretical background to the, some- times observed, puzzling inverse correlation between the degree of de- centralization and economic growth. We provide evidence that there is some interaction between decentralization and corruption in ex- plaining growth. Within an endogenous growth model, we analyze the problem of a benevolent central government trying to determine the optimal degree of fiscal decentralization. Specifically, it can pro- duce a public good directly, but inefficiently, or it can delegate some (or all) of the production to more efficient local bureaucrats. In the latter case, however, some resources will be wasted because of corrup- tion and the costs linked to monitoring expenditures. With respect to the benchmark case, then, the possibility of corruption yields both a distorted allocation of resources (insufficient decentralization) and an overall under provision of the public good.

The Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) institutions are consistent with a New Consensus that emerged in the 1980s, limiting the role for macroeconomic (particularly fiscal) policy to short term stabilizations by means of rules. I will argue that the policy inertia induced by the Consensus may have played a role in the disappointing performance of EMU economies even before the crisis. The crisis of the Consensus, and the debate on secular stagnation, proved that Keynesian (and possibly) persistent excesses of savings over investment may hamper growth. This has put fiscal policy back to the center of the scene, and given the General Theory, at eighty, a second youth. I will argue therefore that the EMU fiscal rule should be amended to allow semi-permanent negative government savings. I will finally argue that a modified Golden Rule may serve this objective, and allow EU-wide policy coordination. This seems the only reasonable reform with some chances of being adopted by the EU divided policy makers.

We investigate the general equilibrium effects of minimum consumption constraints over labor supply decisions. Within a simple static model, a minimum consumption constraint modifies labor supply decisions of unskilled workers, generating the well-known added worker effect. The results of the model help to analyze the Turkish labor market where added worker effects were observed following the 2001 crisis. We investigate the asymmetric effects of the crisis, using the Household Budget Surveys that cover the period between 2002 and 2005. The substantial decrease in real wages has increased labor supply for unskilled labor, especially for women.

in Journal of Evolutionary Economics Publié en 2008-10
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The paper studies the dynamics of firm size in a repeated Cournot game with unknown demand function. We model the firm as a type of artificial neural network. Each period it must learn to map environmental signals to both a demand parameter and its rival’s output choice. However, this learning game is in the background, as we focus on the endogenous adjustment of network size. We investigate the long-run evolution of firm/network size as a function of profits, rival’s size, and the type of adjustment rules used.

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