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  • BONNET François (4)
  • RATHELOT Roland (4)
  • WASMER Etienne (4)
  • BEAUCHEMIN Chris (4)
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This article provides empirical results on patterns of native and immigrant geographic mobility in France. Using longitudinal data, we measure mobility from one French municipality (commune) to another over time and estimate the effect of the initial municipality’s ethnic composition on the probability of moving out. These data allow us to use panel techniques to correct for biases related to selection based on geographic and individual unobservables. Our findings tend to discredit the hypothesis of a “white flight” pattern in residential mobility dynamics in France. Some evidence does show ethnic avoidance mechanisms in natives’ relocating. We also find a strong negative and highly robust effect of co-ethnics’ presence on immigrants’ geographic mobility.

In France, immigrants are more likely to be unemployed or in low-skilled work than their native-born peers. Immigrants face a number of challenges to entering and advancing in the French labor market, including discrimination, foreign qualification recognition, and limited professional networks. Moreover, the French labor market is structurally unfavorable to new entries, whether migrants or native-born youth, and foreign nationals from outside the European Union (EU) are barred from many public- and private-sector jobs. Despite these obstacles, the government has not made a policy priority of getting newcomers into jobs. Integration policy in France has traditionally come in the form of urban policy, targeting disadvantaged neighborhoods that often happen to have a large number of immigrants and their children rather than immigrants themselves. While there have been significant reforms to integration policy since 2000, the focus of these reforms has been cultural, not socioeconomic, integration. Many features of France's robust workforce development system are available to immigrants upon arrival, including use of the public employment service that provides job search assistance and career counseling, but immigrants are excluded from the more prestigious elements like vocational training. This report examines how well mainstream employment policies, in combination with recent integration policy reforms—particularly the introduction of a new category, "newly arrived migrants"—are supporting migrants' integration into the labor market and advancement into middle-skilled jobs. The report provides an overview of immigrants' progress in the French labor market and analyzes recent French immigration policy and the relevant aspects of employment policy, language and vocational training, and antidiscrimination programs. Finally, the report proposes some policy recommendations.

Cet article propose un état des lieux empirique de la question de la ségrégation des populations immigrées en France. Il fournit des informations quantifiées, jusqu’ici très rares dans la recherche française, sur le niveau et l’évolution de la ségrégation de ces populations en utilisant les données issues de cinq recensements successifs et en diversifiant les outils de mesure. Un passage en revue théorique explicite les liens entre l’intégration des immigrés et leur distribution dans l’espace. Alors que la théorie de l’assimilation spatiale prédit une sorte de disparition naturelle de la ségrégation, les évolutions régulièrement décroissantes ne sont observées dans ce travail que pour les immigrés venus d’Espagne et d’Italie. Les immigrés venus d’Afrique ou de Turquie se caractérisent non seulement par des niveaux de ségrégation bien plus forts mais également par des évolutions plus contrastées, difficilement interprétables en termes d’assimilation spatiale. La multiplication des outils de mesure ainsi que des zones géographiques analysées met en évidence la complexité de l’analyse quantitative de la ségrégation spatiale et la diversité des facettes de ce phénomène.

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Purpose – The purpose of this study is to examine the empirical link between the naturalization of immigrants and their subsequent employment status in France from 1968 to 1999. Design/methodology/approach – For that purpose, longitudinal data coming from a panel dataset which follows almost 1 percent of the French population from 1968 to 1999 through information contained in the 1968, 1975, 1982, 1990 and 1999 French censuses were used. Control for the potential endogeneity of the naturalization process was through a bivariate probit model. Findings – It was found that naturalization has a significant positive relationship with immigrants' subsequent employability. This is particularly true for groups of immigrants who have a low probability of employment in the host country. Research limitations/implications – The dataset can only measure statistical association between naturalization and employment, given the lack of timing information. Interpretation in terms of causality is thus not permitted. Originality/value – The dataset used is especially valuable for studying social integration of immigrants, since it allows significant samples of immigrants, according to their country of origin, these groups being generally too small in other surveys.

in International Journal of Manpower Publié en 2013
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Purpose – The purpose of this study is to examine the empirical links between social housing policy and location choices of immigrants in France. Design/methodology/approach – The study characterizes the main individual and contextual determinants of the probability of immigrants to live in a HLM (habitations à loyer modéré), which is the main public housing policy in France. The authors use individual information coming from large (one-fourth) extracts of the French population censuses conducted by INSEE (Paris) in 1982, 1990, and 1999. Findings – In general, migrants live more frequently in social housing than French natives, other observables being equal. In particular, this frequency is higher for migrants from Turkey, Morocco, Southeast Asia, Algeria, Tunisia and Sub-Saharan Africa (in decreasing order). Moreover, migrants of all origins live less often in a HLM when the city has plenty of social housing and when the fraction of natives is high. Research limitations/implications – The dataset can only measure statistical association between location choices of immigrants and the supply of social housing units at the local level, in the absence of panel data and instrumental variables. Interpretation in terms of causality is thus not permitted. Originality/value – The dataset used is especially valuable for studying location choices of immigrants, since it allows significant samples of immigrants, according to their country of origin, these groups being generally too small in (French) surveys.

in Revue française de sociologie Publié en 2006
SAFI Mirna
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Cet article porte sur l'intégration des immigrés en France en tant que processus démographique, économique, social et politique. Les méthodes utilisées sont de type quantitatif et se fondent sur l'exploitation statistique de l'enquête MGIS (Mobilité géographique et insertion sociale, INSEE-INED, 1992). En partant d'une littérature qui met l'accent sur le caractère multidimensionnel et segmenté du processus d'intégration des immigrés, on a cherché à élaborer une typologie empirique de ce dernier permettant de tester l'existence de différents modèles. On montre alors que l'hypothèse classique de l'intégration qui suppose l'existence d'un processus de convergence uniforme n'est validée que pour le cas des Espagnols. D'autres modèles plus complexes et plus segmentés semblent caractériser les différentes communautés représentées dans l'enquête.

Using data from the three rounds of the European Social Survey, this article investigates the disparities in life satisfaction measures between the first- and second-generation immigrants, on the one hand, and the natives, on the other hand, in 13 European countries. Two major theoretical hypotheses explaining the lower level of immigrants’ subjective well-being are tested: the straight line assimilation and the effect of discrimination. The main finding is that immigrants’ relative dissatisfaction does not diminish with time and across generations, which refutes the predictions of the assimilation paradigm. However, when ethnic groups are compared, the discrimination some of them perceive in the host society seems to be a more consistent explanation for their lower life satisfaction level. The effect of discrimination is measured with an attempt to correct for the endogeneity bias that it may lead to by using simultaneous regressions with instrumental variables.

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