Co-auteur
  • RECCHI Ettore (5)
  • SMITH Michael Peter (3)
  • FELDBLUM Miriam (2)
  • GUIRAUDON Virginie (2)
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Type de Document
  • Article (16)
  • Partie ou chapitre de livre (15)
  • Communication non publiée (13)
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[résumé éditeur] Drawing on unique research and rich data on cross-border practices, this book offers an empirically-based view on Europeans’ interconnections in everyday life. It looks at the ways in which EU residents have been getting closer across national frontiers: in their everyday experiences of foreign countries – work, travel, personal networks – but also their knowledge, consumption of foreign products, and attitudes towards foreign culture. These evolving European dimensions have been enabled by the EU-backed legal opening to transnational economic and cultural transactions, while also differing according to national contexts. The book considers how people reconcile their increasing cross-border interconnections and a politically separating Europe of nation states and national interests.

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1ères lignes : La pensée progressisteenvisage généralement I'« intégration» comme la finalité ultime du processus d'immigration. Néanmoins, face à la montée de sentiments antMmmlgrés en Europe -ces derniers ciblant désormais tout autant des citoyens européens de l'Est etdu Sud que les Musulmans ou les Africainssans-papiers- ta pertinence de ceconcept nécessited'être remis en question.

in Cosmopolitan Canvases Sous la direction de VELTHUIS Olav, BAIA CURIONI Stefano Publié en 2015-03
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in Transnational Trajectories: Nation, Citizenship and Region in East Asia Sous la direction de SOYSAL Yasemin, WONG Suk-Ying Publié en 2015-01
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As with other facets of social change, innovation and creativity explored in this volume -- such as science and technology, cuisine, youth culture, gender identities -- the rise of distinctive new contemporary art from East Asia offers possibilities for exploring the interaction of the local, the national, the regional and the global, in a particular field of cultural producution and from new world perspectives. My chapter offers another angle on the "making and unmaking of transnationalism in East Asia", by considering the cross-border dynamics of Japanese modern and contemporary art -- and particularly the international mobility of artists -- as a part of an Asian led cultural globalization (...).

A compilation of Adrian Favell's innovative and agenda setting essays which, since the late 1990s, have charted the emergence of new migration patterns and politics in Europe. Tackling in turn issues of multiculturalism, immigrant integration, free movement, high skilled mobilities, new East-West migrations and regional integration, the collection offers a comprehensive introduction to the dynamic field of international migration studies. At the same time, it poses a sharp challenge to current complacencies, challenging researchers to escape methodological nationalism and the unreflective reproduction of concepts and assumptions in the field, as well as embracing new methodologies and theoretical resources. Moving fluidly across intellectual boundaries as much as national borders, Favell points the way forward to new thinking in this burgeoning and rapidly evolving interdisciplinary field. (Publisher's abstract)

in LSE - European Politics and Policy Series (EUROPP) Publié en 2014-07
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I have just published online the full text of my Weatherhead East Asian Institute lecture at Columbia University (23 April 2014): Islands for Life. Click on the title here or below for access to the pdf file with images (best viewed in something other than Chrome apparently). You can also still download the talk and following Q&A here (about 1 hr 20 mins long). . Here is an abstract of the talk: . Islands for Life: Artistic Responses to Remote Social Polarization and Social Decline in Japan . Contemporary Japan, nearly 25 years into its long, slow post-Bubble decline, is emerging as the world’s leading laboratory of the “post-growth” society: in at once its economic, demographic, political and cultural dimensions. While any growth and dynamism is located in Tokyo and a short list of other cities, its peripheral regions are suffering extraordinary shrinkage through ageing populations and disappearing industrial production. Among the most dramatic versions of this story can be found in the symbolic heartland of Japan’s inland sea, where numerous industrially despoiled volcanic islands, house extremely old and isolated populations in genkai shuuraku type settlements with little or no hope of sustainability by conventional political or social intervention. It is here that a number of ambitious, ostensibly utopian, artistic projects are engaging in interventions based on a creative economy logic to revitalise, sustain or at least soothe places which seem doomed to die out. Focusing on the long term work of the artist Yukinori Yanagi in Seto — both his residency and copper factory conversion (Seirensho, 2008) on Inujima and his new “Art Base” on the former orange producing island of Momoshima — my presentation will reflect upon how such art projects are way of imagining the future of post-growth societies, with comparative relevance far beyond Japan: offering welfare and community to isolated ageing residents; practical engagement for the “lost generation” young artists who join these projects; and proposing radical ideas for low energy lifestyles, which recycle abandoned public and private building, and reconnect locals with outsiders. These projects provide a quiet space for both backward looking memory of the boom years and reflection about alternative futures: a “small good thing” emerging from the avant garde, in a country still ruled by mainstream politics and business oblivious to the disaster it is leading the country towards. . I will present a new, shorter analytical presentation on the subject to the upcoming PoNJa GenKon conference in New York on 13 September 2014.

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The British public exhibit some of the strongest opposition to EU institutions there is yet, in their day-to-day behaviour, British people are among the most enthusiastic Europeans around

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The article challenges the orthodoxy of current critical readings of the European crisis that discuss the failings of the EU in terms of the triumph of ‘neo-liberalism’. Defending instead a liberal view on international migration, which stresses the potentially positive economic, political and cultural benefits of market-driven forces enabling movements across borders, it details the various ways in which European regional integration has enabled the withdrawal of state control and restriction on certain forms of external and internal migration. This implementation of liberal ideas on the freedom of movement of persons has largely been of benefit to migrants, and both receiving and sending societies alike. These ideas are now threatened by democratic retrenchment. It is Britain, often held up as a negative example of ‘neo-liberalism’, which has proven to be the member state that most fulfils the EU’s core adherence to principles of mobile, open, non-discriminatory labour markets. On this question, and despite its current anti-immigration politics, it offers a positive example of how Europe as a whole could benefit from more not less liberalization.

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