Co-auteur
  • BOUYAT Jeanne (1)
  • FOURCHARD Laurent (1)
Type de Document
  • Article (2)
  • Partie ou chapitre de livre (2)
  • Contribution à un site web (2)
in Identification and Citizenship in Africa. Biometrics, the Documentary State and Bureaucratic Writings of the Self Sous la direction de AWENENGO DALBERTO Séverine, BANEGAS Richard Publié en 2021-05-10
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How are the practices for verifying the identity of immigrant learners informed by the devices on which school staff rely? An analysis of the materiality and utilization of these devices in low-income Johannesburg high schools reveals that they form a mixed regime of identification in which documentary verification predominates and is linked with interpersonal certification and digital authentication. This mixed regime fosters the exclusion of immigrant learners, as it supports the joint enforcement of migration control in schools by the Department of Basic Education and the Department of Home Affairs. Digitalization reinforces paper barriers to schooling in the form of identification documentation requirements by limiting school staff's ability to circumvent them, in contexts marked by precarity and ordinary xenophobia.

in Identification and Citizenship in Africa. Biometrics, the Documentary State and Bureaucratic Writings of the Self Sous la direction de AWENENGO DALBERTO Séverine, BANEGAS Richard Publié en 2021-05-10
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For 40 years, Nigeria has separated its citizens into two categories, ‘indigenes’ and ‘non-indigenes.’ Indigene citizens can trace their genealogical roots back to a community in a specific locality. All local governments issue certificates of indigene to certify this origin, but the techniques of identification and the definition of the term indigene vary radically from one local government to another. This chapter explores the relationship between local government officers, the chiefs working for them, and users seeking a certificate in Oyo State and Plateau State. This bureaucratic relationship is a form of ordinary state-citizen interaction, yet it redefines an exclusive local citizenship. The chapter seeks to understand how applicants engage with these procedures, how ancestral origins are investigated, and the conditions in which issuing certificates of indigene can become a controversial political issue.

in Site du CERI Publié en 2019-04-24
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Nora Bardelli est une chercheuse postdoctorale présente au CERI dans le cadre du projet ANR La vie sociale des papiers en Afrique PIAF, coordonné par Richard Banégas. Nous l’avons interrogée sur le projet, sur les objectifs de PIAF et sur son travail personnel. Entretien réalisé par Miriam Périer.

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Cet article examine l’introduction de l’enregistrement biométrique des réfugiés maliens qui vivent au Burkina Faso. Il interroge la manière dont cette technologie, basée sur l’objectivité supposée de la vérité des corps, affecte les autres modes d’identification des réfugiés, en particulier ceux qui reposent sur le témoignage et l’authentification sociale. Il pose également la question des effets de cette nouvelle technologie sur la façon dont les réfugiés eux-mêmes construisent leur identité sociale. Finalement, l’article permet de comprendre que l’introduction de l’enregistrement biométrique des réfugiés n’a pas radicalement fait évoluer la manière dont le statut de réfugié est octroyé et la catégorie sociale construite.

Nora Bardelli is a postdoctoral researcher at CERI within the ANR PIAF project, 'The social life of identity documents in Africa' under the guidance of Prof Richard Banégas. She has accepted to answer our questions. We are interested in knowing more about PIAF and about her. What is PIAF and what is the subject of this collective project? Who is Nora Bardelli and what are her research interests? Interview by Miriam Périer

Since early 2016, part of the Malian urban refugees living in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso, have to “capitalize” on their refugee status to make ends meet. By examining when, why, and how the refugee status transmutes into an economic asset, this article shows how the possibilities to negotiate with the refugee category vary significantly within this group of forced migrants. Indeed, categories are not only imposed on people, but are negotiated by the actors themselves in their interactions and within their social and political economies. My article shows how the refugees’ ability or possibility to participate in the co-construction of their category is shaped by both the social and political context in which they are, as well as by wider intersectional and structural dynamics in which their lives are situated, such as socio-economic class, gender and race.