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  • WEILER Florian (8)
  • FINK Michael (5)
  • CASTRO Paula (4)
  • NUNN Patrick (3)
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  • Article (14)
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in European Review of International Studies Publication date 2021-04-07
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Compte rendu de l'ouvrage "Environmental Justice: Key Issues", Brendan Coolsaet (ed.). Routledge, 2020, pp. 364 isbn 9780367139933

in Earth System Governance Publication date 2021-03-05
WEILER Florian
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This article examines how adaptation aid is allocated across countries, and specifically focus on the role of donor—donor interactions in allocation decisions. We test two contrasting hypotheses: the presence of other adaptation donors in a recipient country may increase or reduce the likelihood of donor i to provide adaptation aid to that recipient. In the former case, donors support adaptation in the same recipient countries; in the latter, they provide their adaptation aid to different recipient countries. We model adaptation aid allocations as a network, and apply an innovative method, bipartite temporal exponential random graph models, to bilateral adaptation aid flows between 2010 and 2016. Our empirical analysis finds strong evidence for donor interactions. The results suggest a positive effect of other donors: donors tend to support adaptation in similar sets of recipient countries. These results provide further evidence that adaptation aid largely follow the structures and processes of traditional development aid, which poses questions for the additionality of finance for adaptation to climate change.

in Ocean & Coastal Management Publication date 2021-03-02
NUNN Patrick
DUVAT Virginie
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Owing to their high shoreline-to-land-area ratios, islands are especially sensitive to coastal change and their inhabitants especially vulnerable to associated impacts. In places along island coasts where shoreline recession is particularly noticeable and/or its impacts most severe, perhaps because adjacent population densities are unusually high, a common response has been to build a seawall. While this solution may appear instinctively correct, studies suggest otherwise, even to the point where seawall construction, particularly outside urban areas, might be considered maladaptive – neither solving the intended problem in the short-term nor helping coastal peoples cope effectively with longer-term shoreline change. Seawall construction can be viewed as part of a broader group of maladaptive solutions that are uncritically embraced by island peoples who may judge the efficacy of these solutions by their success in (wealthier) continental or urban contexts. More effective and sustainable approaches involve nature-based solutions in the short term and planning for transformative responses involving relocation in the longer term.

Toute négociation multilatérale est structurée par les coalitions ; celles-ci jouent un rôle particulièrement important pour les petits États tels que les petits États insulaires. Le présent article examine une telle coalition, l’Alliance des petits États insulaires (l’AOSIS) au sein des négociations climatiques. En suivant les questions de ce numéro spécial, l’analyse démontre d’abord la nécessité d’un engagement collectif en vue des ressources limitées des petits États. Elle examine ensuite la diversité des délégations insulaires et souligne l’importance du soutien des organisations non-insulaires. Dans la troisième partie, elle explore les positions insulaires communes au sein des négociations, mais aussi la pluralité des intérêts des membres de l’AOSIS, et enfin les accomplissements de l’AOSIS. Même si ceux-là restent parfois symboliques, c’est grâce aux efforts communs via l’AOSIS que les petits États insulaires font entendre leur voix sur la scène internationale.

in Climate Change and Impacts in the Pacific Edited by KUMAR Lalit Publication date 2021-03
NUNN Patrick
MCLEAN Roger
DEAN Annika
FONG Teddy
IESE Viliamu
KATONIVUALIKU Manasa
KOROVULAVULA Isoa
KUMAR Roselyn
TABE Tammy
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Over the past few decades, attempts at adaptation to climate change (current and future) in the Pacific Islands have largely failed to be either effective or sustained. Among the many reasons for this failure may be that most adaptation strategies have been designed and driven by outsiders rather than by persons familiar with island contexts and diversity, especially the sociocultural nuances of particular situations. In a series of eight thematic case studies, written by scientists with an intimate understanding of the Pacific Islands, this chapter explores the reasons behind adaptation failure and explains what needs to improve in the future for adaptation to be both effective and sustained. Case studies focus on rural seawalls, relocation and peripherality as a proxy for autonomous community coping, climate finance, island food systems, adaptation project design, livelihood sustainability and inter-island resettlement. The goal of this chapter is to inform stakeholders how to optimise outcomes from future adaptation interventions, something that is becoming daily more urgent as the pace of twenty-first century climate change increases.

in Site du CERI Publication date 2021-02-16
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Carola Kloeck est coéditrice de l'ouvrage intitulé Coalitions in the Climate Change Negociations (Routledge), qui offre un aperçu des modèles de coopération dans les négociations sur le changement climatique et propose une analyse approfondie des coalitions spécifiques et de leurs relations. Elle a répondu à nos questions sur son livre. Propos recueillis par Miriam Périer, CERI.

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Carola Klöck has recently coedited a volume entitled Coalitions in the Climate Change Negociations (Routledge). The volume provides a broad overview of cooperation patterns in climate change negotiations and an in-depth analysis of specific coalitions and their relations. Why do countries decide to join a coalition, and what are the potential costs of acting through coalitions? Are there specificities of coalitions in the climate change negociations? These are among the questions we asked Carola. Interview with Carola Klöck, by Miriam Périer, CERI.

Edited by KLOECK Carola, CASTRO Paula, WEILER Florian, BLAXEKJÆR Lau Øfjord Publication date 2020-11-23
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This edited volume provides both a broad overview of cooperation patterns in the UNFCCC climate change negotiations and an in-depth analysis of specific coalitions and their relations. Over the course of three parts, this book maps out and takes stock of patterns of cooperation in the climate change negotiations since their inception in 1995. In Part I, the authors focus on the evolution of coalitions over time, examining why these emerged and how they function. Part II drills deeper into a set of coalitions, particularly "new" political groups that have emerged in the last rounds of negotiations around the Copenhagen Accord and the Paris Agreement. Finally, Part III explores common themes and open questions in coalition research, and provides a comprehensive overview of coalitions in the climate change negotiations. By taking a broad approach to the study of coalitions in the climate change negotiations, this volume is an essential reference source for researchers, students, and negotiators with an interest in the dynamics of climate negotiations.

in Coalitions in the Climate Change Negotiations Edited by KLOECK Carola, CASTRO Paula, WEILER Florian, BLAXEKJÆR Lau Øfjord Publication date 2020-11-23
CASTRO Paula
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This chapter takes stock of the growing number of country coalitions active in the climate change negotiations. We start by characterising coalitions on the basis of their geographic and thematic scope, the size of their membership, and their level of formality. Based on these characteristics, we identify three clusters: regional; global climate-specific; and global generic coalitions. When looking at coalition activity over time, we see that global climate-specific coalitions in particular have emerged in recent years, and that once coalitions are created, they tend to persist. As a result, most developing countries belong to several coalitions. We posit two possible and contrasting implications of such overlapping coalition memberships: coalitions may mutually support each other as common members may help to build bridges across them; and/or multiple coalition memberships may create logistical challenges for smaller parties and lead to tensions in the case of divergent coalition positions. Further research is needed to shed light on these potential implications.

in Coalitions in the Climate Change Negotiations Edited by KLOECK Carola, CASTRO Paula, WEILER Florian, BLAXEKJÆR Lau Øfjord Publication date 2020-11-23
CASTRO Paula
WEILER Florian
BLAXEKJÆR Lau Øfjord
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This introductory chapter sets the scene for the present volume on cooperation and coalitions in the climate change negotiations. Coalitions – understood here as cooperative efforts between at least two parties to obtain common goals – come in many forms and shapes. Although central to multilateral negotiations, they have received surprisingly little academic attention. We review research on coalitions, with a focus on the climate change negotiations. Our review shows that we still have a poor understanding of coalition formation, maintenance, and effectiveness. We then outline how the various chapters of this volume address this gap and contribute to our understanding of coalitions in multilateral (climate) negotiations.

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