Co-auteur
  • WEILER Florian (7)
  • FINK Michael (4)
  • CASTRO Paula (4)
  • BLAXEKJÆR Lau Øfjord (3)
  • Voir plus
Type de Document
  • Article (11)
  • Contribution à un site web (5)
  • Livre (3)
  • Partie ou chapitre de livre (3)
  • Voir plus
Sous la direction de KLOECK Carola, CASTRO Paula, WEILER Florian, BLAXEKJÆR Lau Øfjord Publié en 2020-11-23
34
vues

0
téléchargements
This edited volume provides both a broad overview of cooperation patterns in the UNFCCC climate change negotiations and an in-depth analysis of specific coalitions and their relations. Over the course of three parts, this book maps out and takes stock of patterns of cooperation in the climate change negotiations since their inception in 1995. In Part I, the authors focus on the evolution of coalitions over time, examining why these emerged and how they function. Part II drills deeper into a set of coalitions, particularly "new" political groups that have emerged in the last rounds of negotiations around the Copenhagen Accord and the Paris Agreement. Finally, Part III explores common themes and open questions in coalition research, and provides a comprehensive overview of coalitions in the climate change negotiations. By taking a broad approach to the study of coalitions in the climate change negotiations, this volume is an essential reference source for researchers, students, and negotiators with an interest in the dynamics of climate negotiations.

in Coalitions in the Climate Change Negotiations Sous la direction de KLOECK Carola, CASTRO Paula, WEILER Florian, BLAXEKJÆR Lau Øfjord Publié en 2020-11-23
CASTRO Paula
4
vues

0
téléchargements
This chapter takes stock of the growing number of country coalitions active in the climate change negotiations. We start by characterising coalitions on the basis of their geographic and thematic scope, the size of their membership, and their level of formality. Based on these characteristics, we identify three clusters: regional; global climate-specific; and global generic coalitions. When looking at coalition activity over time, we see that global climate-specific coalitions in particular have emerged in recent years, and that once coalitions are created, they tend to persist. As a result, most developing countries belong to several coalitions. We posit two possible and contrasting implications of such overlapping coalition memberships: coalitions may mutually support each other as common members may help to build bridges across them; and/or multiple coalition memberships may create logistical challenges for smaller parties and lead to tensions in the case of divergent coalition positions. Further research is needed to shed light on these potential implications.

in Coalitions in the Climate Change Negotiations Sous la direction de KLOECK Carola, CASTRO Paula, WEILER Florian, BLAXEKJÆR Lau Øfjord Publié en 2020-11-23
CASTRO Paula
WEILER Florian
BLAXEKJÆR Lau Øfjord
7
vues

0
téléchargements
This introductory chapter sets the scene for the present volume on cooperation and coalitions in the climate change negotiations. Coalitions – understood here as cooperative efforts between at least two parties to obtain common goals – come in many forms and shapes. Although central to multilateral negotiations, they have received surprisingly little academic attention. We review research on coalitions, with a focus on the climate change negotiations. Our review shows that we still have a poor understanding of coalition formation, maintenance, and effectiveness. We then outline how the various chapters of this volume address this gap and contribute to our understanding of coalitions in multilateral (climate) negotiations.

in Coalitions in the Climate Change Negotiations Sous la direction de KLOECK Carola, CASTRO Paula, WEILER Florian, BLAXEKJÆR Lau Øfjord Publié en 2020-11-23
CASTRO Paula
WEILER Florian
BLAXEKJÆR Lau Øfjord
8
vues

0
téléchargements
This concluding chapter returns to the point of departure of this volume: the central, but understudied role of coalitions in multilateral negotiations. The present volume addresses this research gap by examining a plurality of coalitions active in the climate regime, as well as exploring their developments over time. Four common themes and findings emerge from the various contributions; coalitions are context-specific and shape the negotiation dynamics as much as they are shaped by them. Coalitions are also sticky and tend to persist over time, although their level of activity and influence may vary across different negotiation periods. Coalitions also operate at different levels, such that we can speak of a “hierarchy” of coalitions, including both sub-coalitions and meta-coalitions. Finally, the proliferation of coalitions has resulted in multiple and overlapping coalition memberships, with positive and negative effects for the influence of individual countries and coalitions. We conclude this chapter by highlighting some open questions and ways forward for coalition research.

Publié en 2020-10-28 Collection Research Papers : 153
FAGOTTO Irène
3
vues

0
téléchargements
Small island developing states (SIDS) are recognised as “particularly” vulnerable to the effects of climate change, and accordingly receive relatively high levels of adaptation assistance as a group. We here analyse bilateral and multilateral adaptation aid committed to SIDS between 2009 and 2018, as reported in the OECD Creditor Reporting System (CRS) to better understand the overall evolution of adaptation aid for SIDS, allocation patterns across regions, countries and sectors, as well as the sources and channels of this aid. Since 2009, more and more aid has gone into adaptation: overall, donors pledged $6.6 billion for adaptation in SIDS between 2009 and 2018, and supported a wide variety of projects, mainly through grants.

49
vues

0
téléchargements
Pacific Islands are already responding to the adverse effects of climate change, but it is unclear to what extent these responses effectively and sustainably improve local resilience. New research seeks to understand how local beneficiaries evaluate adaptation projects and what this teaches us for future adaptation.

in Cogito (Sciences Po) Publié en 2020-07-03
FINK Michael
5
vues

0
téléchargements
Because of climate change, the inhabitants of some small islands may see their lives change radically Why are small islands more vulnerable to the global and major ordeal of climate change? How do these small states deal with this huge challenge? There is no doubt that we can learn from their experience. These are among the crucial questions Carola Klöck and Michael Fink answer in this interview and have examined in their recently coedited volume entitled Dealing with Climate Change on Small Islands: Toward Effective and Sustainable Adaptation (Universitätsverlag Göttingen). Interview by Miriam Périer

This study explores multiple coalition memberships in multilateral negotiations, with a focus on climate negotiations. Why do countries engage in multiple coalitions, and how do multiple coalition memberships affect their influence? I argue that coalitions differ in important respects. Accordingly, countries may belong to both, long-term and short-lived coalitions; they may consciously decide to join a coalition, but also be associated by default. Finally, larger coalitions confer numerical strength, while smaller (sub-)coalitions help voice common positions. Regarding effects, I propose two perspectives. The zero-sum perspective highlights coordination costs and potentially incompatible positions, while the win-win perspective focuses on the complementarity of different coalitions and the potential for mutual support. Anecdotal evidence from the climate negotiations offers support for these perspectives, but further empirical research is needed to better understand why countries join several coalitions, how they navigate these multiple coalition memberships, and how these affect their influence.

in International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics Publié en 2020-04-19
GRECKSCH Kevin
21
vues

0
téléchargements
As climate change impacts become increasingly apparent, adaptation becomes increasingly urgent. Accordingly, adaptation to climate change has shifted towards the centre of attention in both policy and research. In this article, we review the last 10 years of adaptation research (2008–2018), with a focus on work within the Earth System Governance network. We use the lens of access and allocation to structure our review and examine how adaptation affects, and is affected by, access to basic needs, basic rights, and decision-making on the one hand, as well as allocation of responsibilities, resources, and risks on the other. We find that questions of justice, equity, and fairness are fundamental to all dimensions of adaptation. The access perspective, for example, suggests that we need to assess vulnerability, understood broadly, while the allocation perspective focuses on questions of responsibility for being vulnerable, e.g. when people live, or move to, hazard-prone areas exposed to climate risk. This also relates to questions of who is responsible for selecting, implementing, and funding adaptation measures. Overall, we find that the framework of “access and allocation” and its subcategories offer a detailed approach to adaptation and adaptation research, but that it is not intuitive. The notion of “climate justice” seems to resonate more with both academic and policy debates.

114
vues

0
téléchargements
Les effets de la crise du Covid-19 sur le traitement du problème du réchauffement climatique -- Le coronavirus a envahi nos écrans et les médias ne consacrent que peu d’espace et de temps aux informations qui n’ont pas de lien avec la pandémie. Rares sont les personnes qui ont eu vent du cyclone tropical de force 5, baptisé Harold, qui a touché l’île de Vanuatu le 6 avril dernier et qui a entraîné des dégâts monumentaux – à peine cinq années après que ce jeune État a souffert du passage du cyclone tropical Pam, le plus important jamais observé. Le changement climatique détruit plus que le Covid-19, même si ses effets sont moins visibles, moins concentrés et moins présents dans les pays industrialisés du nord qui sont, pour l’heure, les plus touchés par le coronavirus. Les conséquences du changement climatique sont en effet plus difficiles à identifier et à tracer...

Suivant