Type
Book
Title
The Invention of a Nation. Zionist Thought and the Making of Modern Israël
In
Comparative Politics and International Studies Series
Editor
London : Hurst Publishers
Collection
Comparative Politics and International Studies Series
Pages
308 p.
ISBN
9781850655954
Keywords
Nationalism, Zionism, Israel, identity
Abstract
EN
The vulnerability which is the lot of any nation without a state was experienced in a particularly extreme way by the Jews. With the destitution and persecution of many Jewish communities in the 19th century, especially in Eastern Europe, Jews demanded a solution to their uprootedness. This required a state. Alain Dieckhoff recounts the tortuous ordeal through which the Jews reacted to the challenge of modernity. While some contributed to the development of capitalism and put their talents at the service of the Western European states, others threw themselves into revolutionary movements. Yet others imagined ways of ‘re-nationalising’ Jews by transforming them into a nation. Thus the Jews were formidable experimenters who participated in causes with contradictory agendas: assimilation (bourgeois or socialist) or nationalism. The text focuses on Zionism, whose ultimate objective was the creation of a sovereign state for the Jews in Palestine. This required the invention of the Jewish nation. Such an objective meant several things: building a national language, defining a secularised and territorialised Jewish identity, and using military power. This was a difficult enterprise, as the national project was faced with the persistence of communitarianism. But the enterprise was at least partly successful: this process of politicisation makes Israel a paradigmatic example of the invention of a nation-state, the main focus of this work.

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