Type
Article
Title
Does the French Bioethics Law create a 'moral exception' to the use of human cells for health ? : A legal and organisational issue
Author(s)
MAHALATCHIMY Aurélie - Politiques publiques, ACtion politique, TErritoires (Author)
RIAL-SEBBAG Emmanuelle - Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (Author)
TOURNAY Virginie - (Author)
FAULKNER Alex - (Author)
Editor
ES
Volume
3
Number
7
Pages
17 - 37 p.
ISSN
19897022
Keywords
Human cells, Bioethics, Principle of non-commercialisation, Social arrangements, National stem cell bank, Células humanas, Bioética, Banco nacional de células madre, Acuerdos sociales, Principio de no comercialización
Abstract
EN | ES
This article focuses on the legal and organisational regulation of human cells in the United Kingdom and France. French Bioethics Law regulates human cells for health according to European Union law where it is enforceable. But products unregulated by EU law and based on human cells are never considered as medicinal products, given the strict implementation of the principle of “nonpatrimonialité” of the human body and its elements. By comparison, in the UK such products can be qualified as medicinal products. Moreover, the setting up of the UK stem cell bank gives rise to the development of policies which expand the stem cell as a legal object. The paper discusses how these societies’ ethical and legal commitments underlie organisational practices in order to analyse the relationship between the existence (or not) of a national stem cell bank and the broader regulation of human cells.
BIBLIOGRAPHIC QUOTE
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