Type
Article
Titre
Legal Rule and Tribal Politics: The US Army and the Taliban in Afghanistan (2001–13)
Dans
Development and Change
Auteur(s)
BACZKO Adam - (Auteur)
Éditeur
GB : Blackwell Publishing
Volume
47
Numéro
6
Pages
1412 - 1433 p.
ISSN
0012155X
DOI
10.1111/dech.12276
Mots clés
Afghanistan, United States, governance, army, Taliban
Résumé
EN
This article investigates the implications of two competing modes of governance, those of the US Army and the Taliban, through the lens of the relations between property, citizenship and political authority in Kunar, Afghanistan, between 2001 and 2013. To account for the political struggle in the province, the author outlines two models of governance: a political one based on mediation and conciliation, which the US Army applied; and a legal one promoting direct relations between the rulers and the ruled, upheld by the Taliban. After looking at the political dynamics in Kunar since the nineteenth century and since 2001, I argue that it is paradoxically the Taliban that placed itself in continuity with the state, while the US Army played tribal politics and undermined the legitimacy of the regime it had helped to install in Kabul. Kunar is a case of an armed confrontation in which different militarized groups compete to impose their rule by controlling space and access to landed property.

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