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  • DELPEUCH Claire (4)
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  • DE MELO Jaime (3)
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Negotiators in Geneva are still struggling to conclude the Doha Round of multilateral trade talks at the World Trade Organization (WTO). However, after seven years of negotiations, many people - and especially many industrialists in Europe and the United States - are not convinced that the negotiations are worth the efforts being put into them. These doubts have been fueled by the modesty of recent estimates of the gains on the table in the negotiations on Non-Agricultural Market Access (NAMA). This policy brief argues that a completed Doha Round has more to offer to the U.S. and European private sector than cuts to already low applied industrial tariffs. The real gold mine in the Doha negotiations is the increased certainty that would flow from large cuts to bound tariff rates.

in Europe's Industries : Public and Private Strategies for Change Sous la direction de SHEPHERD Geoffrey, SAUNDERS Christopher Thomas, DUCHÊNE François Publication date 1983
SAUNDERS Christopher Thomas
MESSERLIN Patrick
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in Revue d'économie financière Publication date 1994
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in The WTO After Seattle Sous la direction de SCHOTT Jeffrey J. Publication date 2000
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in Multinationals, Governments and International Technology Transfer Sous la direction de BERTIN Gilles Yves, SAFARIAN Alfred Edward Publication date 1987
MESSERLIN Patrick
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in Croissance, échange et monnaie en économie internationale : mélanges en l'honneur de Monsieur le Professeur Jean Weiller Publication date 1985
MESSERLIN Patrick
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The EC should position itself as a WTO Member with a long term view of the world trade regime. Assuming responsibility for the future relevance of the world trading system is a sign of leadership. Europe implicitly assumes that future rounds of trade negotiations will follow after a successful Doha Round. Those future rounds will address the unfinished business left by (perhaps) a more modest but a “clean” Doha outcome much more easily than if they inherit a Doha package more ambitious for some products, but riddled with more distortive exceptions on many products. In short, the ECs long term strategy should be to promote a series of WTO Rounds of liberalization as a slow but nonetheless perennial “peeling of the protectionist onion”.

Trade protection costs the European Community between 6 and 7 percent of its gross domestic product, or the equivalent of the annual economic output of Spain. Continuing the Institute's series on trade protection in major countries (which already includes the United States, Japan, Korea, and China), this study by Patrick A. Messerlin is the first attempt to measure the impact of all types of protection in the European Union. Patrick A. Messerlin uses partial equilibrium methods to assess the costs to consumers and to evaluate the political economy of European protection. He also examines in detail the intricate relations between the major EC domestic policies—from the Common Agricultural Policy to the Single Market in services—and EC commercial policy. He aims to assess their dynamic evolution for the decade to come, which will be marked by the first accessions of Central European countries to the EC and by the debate on the European political union. The study provides a valuable agenda for the upcoming round of WTO negotiations and underlines their role as a support for domestic reforms that the EC should undertake for its own benefit.

in Imperfect competition and international trade : the policy aspects of intra-industry trade Sous la direction de GREENAWAY David, THARAKAN P. K. Mathew Publication date 1986
BÉCUWE S.
MESSERLIN Patrick
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