Coauthor
  • FINK Michael (4)
  • WEILER Florian (4)
  • MOLENAERS Nadia (2)
  • MOHAMED Ibrahim (1)
  • Show more
Document Type
  • Article (11)
  • Web site contribution (5)
  • Book (2)
  • Working paper (1)
in Nature Climate Change Publication date 2020-07-03
30
views

0
downloads
Pacific Islands are already responding to the adverse effects of climate change, but it is unclear to what extent these responses effectively and sustainably improve local resilience. New research seeks to understand how local beneficiaries evaluate adaptation projects and what this teaches us for future adaptation.

in Cogito (Sciences Po) Publication date 2020-07-03
FINK Michael
0
views

0
downloads
Because of climate change, the inhabitants of some small islands may see their lives change radically Why are small islands more vulnerable to the global and major ordeal of climate change? How do these small states deal with this huge challenge? There is no doubt that we can learn from their experience. These are among the crucial questions Carola Klöck and Michael Fink answer in this interview and have examined in their recently coedited volume entitled Dealing with Climate Change on Small Islands: Toward Effective and Sustainable Adaptation (Universitätsverlag Göttingen). Interview by Miriam Périer

This study explores multiple coalition memberships in multilateral negotiations, with a focus on climate negotiations. Why do countries engage in multiple coalitions, and how do multiple coalition memberships affect their influence? I argue that coalitions differ in important respects. Accordingly, countries may belong to both, long-term and short-lived coalitions; they may consciously decide to join a coalition, but also be associated by default. Finally, larger coalitions confer numerical strength, while smaller (sub-)coalitions help voice common positions. Regarding effects, I propose two perspectives. The zero-sum perspective highlights coordination costs and potentially incompatible positions, while the win-win perspective focuses on the complementarity of different coalitions and the potential for mutual support. Anecdotal evidence from the climate negotiations offers support for these perspectives, but further empirical research is needed to better understand why countries join several coalitions, how they navigate these multiple coalition memberships, and how these affect their influence.

in International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics Publication date 2020-04-19
GRECKSCH Kevin
16
views

0
downloads
As climate change impacts become increasingly apparent, adaptation becomes increasingly urgent. Accordingly, adaptation to climate change has shifted towards the centre of attention in both policy and research. In this article, we review the last 10 years of adaptation research (2008–2018), with a focus on work within the Earth System Governance network. We use the lens of access and allocation to structure our review and examine how adaptation affects, and is affected by, access to basic needs, basic rights, and decision-making on the one hand, as well as allocation of responsibilities, resources, and risks on the other. We find that questions of justice, equity, and fairness are fundamental to all dimensions of adaptation. The access perspective, for example, suggests that we need to assess vulnerability, understood broadly, while the allocation perspective focuses on questions of responsibility for being vulnerable, e.g. when people live, or move to, hazard-prone areas exposed to climate risk. This also relates to questions of who is responsible for selecting, implementing, and funding adaptation measures. Overall, we find that the framework of “access and allocation” and its subcategories offer a detailed approach to adaptation and adaptation research, but that it is not intuitive. The notion of “climate justice” seems to resonate more with both academic and policy debates.

109
views

0
downloads
Les effets de la crise du Covid-19 sur le traitement du problème du réchauffement climatique -- Le coronavirus a envahi nos écrans et les médias ne consacrent que peu d’espace et de temps aux informations qui n’ont pas de lien avec la pandémie. Rares sont les personnes qui ont eu vent du cyclone tropical de force 5, baptisé Harold, qui a touché l’île de Vanuatu le 6 avril dernier et qui a entraîné des dégâts monumentaux – à peine cinq années après que ce jeune État a souffert du passage du cyclone tropical Pam, le plus important jamais observé. Le changement climatique détruit plus que le Covid-19, même si ses effets sont moins visibles, moins concentrés et moins présents dans les pays industrialisés du nord qui sont, pour l’heure, les plus touchés par le coronavirus. Les conséquences du changement climatique sont en effet plus difficiles à identifier et à tracer...

15
views

0
downloads
Why are small islands more vulnerable to the global and major ordeal of climate change? How do they face this huge challenge and what can we learn from their experience? These are among the crucial questions examined by Carola Klöck and Michael Fink in their recently coedited volume entitled Dealing with Climate Change on Small Islands: Toward Effective and Sustainable Adaptation, published by Universitätsverlag Göttingen.

in Site du CERI Publication date 2019-12-04
19
views

0
downloads
The Climate Summit - COP25 - started on Monday 2 December in Madrid, under the Chilean Presidency, which was unable to host the event in Santiago de Chile as planned due to the domestic situation. Despite this unprecedented change of location, the COP will have to unite nearly 30,000 participants from all over the world. From Sciences Po, Carola Klöck, assistant professor at CERI, is on site in the context of her research on small island developing states (SIDS). She is interested in how these states— highly affected but with very limited resources and capacities—engage in negotiations and make their voices heard in the process.

Small islands have received growing attention in the context of climate change. Rising sea-levels, intensifying storms, changing rainfall patterns and increasing temperatures force islanders to deal with and adapt to a changing climate. How do they respond to the challenge? What works, what doesn’t – and why? The present volume addresses these questions by exploring adaptation experiences in small islands across the world’s oceans from various perspectives and disciplines, including geography, anthropology,political science, psychology, and philosophy. The contributions to the volume focus on political and financial difficulties of climate change governance; highlight the importance of cultural values, local knowledge and perceptions in and for adaptation; and question to what extent mobility and migration constitute sustainable adaptation. Overall, the contributions highlight the diversity of island contexts, but also their specific challenges; they present valuable lessons for both adaptation success and failure, and emphasise island resilience and agency in the face of climate change.

The Halligen in the German North Sea are a special type of island that are highly exposed to the adverse impacts of climate change. How do the Halligen adapt to these impacts, and what are the controversies and conflicts surrounding the adaptation process? In line with the recent “political turn” in critical adaptation research, we understand adaptation as a social and political—and therefore inherently contested—process. To uncover the contested nature of adaptation, we carried out a case study of Hallig Hooge, the largest inhabited Hallig, based on semi-structured interviews with Hallig residents. We first examine how the local population on Hallig Hooge perceives and responds to the impacts of climate change. In a second step, we then identify tensions or controversies that surround the adaptation process. The interviews reveal a high level of climate change awareness. The local population notices many different changes, but does not necessarily perceive these as threatening, not least because a range of adaptation measures is available and partly already being implemented. While the population approves of adaptation in principle, there are inherent tensions. Notably, we identify three partly overlapping controversies regarding, first, a general dichotomy of man vs. nature; second, the role of different actors and types of knowledge; and third, the objective of adaptation. Hence, the local population questions many regulations and restrictions associated with environmental protection; feels that their experience and local knowledge is not taken seriously enough; and worries that too many innovations may fundamentally change the character of the Hallig. Overall, the adaptive capacity of Hallig Hooge is high, but long-term climate change and adaptation to it raise the question of what it is that should be protected and preserved. This question is a political one, and it can only be answered through dialogue with the local population.

31
views

0
downloads
Small Island Developing States (SIDS) share a common vulnerability to climate change. Adaptation to climate change and variability is urgently needed yet, while some is already occurring in SIDS, research on the nature and efficacy of adaptation across SIDS is fragmentary. In this article, we systematically review academic literature to identify where adaptation in SIDS is documented; what type of adaptation strategies are taken, and in response to which climate change impacts; and the extent to which this adaptation has been judged as successful. Our analysis indicates that much adaptation research is concentrated on the Pacific, on independent island states, and on core areas within SIDS. Research documents a wide array of adaptation strategies across SIDS, notably structural or physical and behavioral changes. Yet, evaluation of concrete adaptation interventions is lacking; it thus remains unclear to what extent documented adaptation effectively and sustainably reduces SIDS’ vulnerability and increases their resilience.

Next