Co-auteur
  • MESSERLIN Patrick (4)
  • ORLIAC Thomas (1)
  • LE VERNOY Alexandre (1)
  • ALLE Camille (1)
  • Voir plus
Type de Document
  • Working paper (3)
  • Article (1)
  • Rapport (1)
En ce début d’année 2015, l’AdCF diffuse à ses adhérents sa nouvelle publication, réalisée avec le soutien de la Caisse des dépôts et consignations (CDC) consacrée aux pactes financiers et fiscaux. Outil de coordination entre communes et communautés, ces pactes commencent à se déployer dans les territoires, indépendamment de toute exigence législative. A partir d’une enquête conduite en 2013 et 2014, la publication de l’AdCF propose des exemples de pratiques avancées et des éclairages méthodologiques destinés aux élus et cadres dirigeants des intercommunalités.

5
vues

0
téléchargements
The Aid for Trade (AfT) initiative has been hailed as highly successful in raising the profile of trade as a tool for development. Developing countries have increasingly mainstreamed trade in their development strategies, while donors have responded by mobilising additional resources for trade-related programmes and projects (together referred to as operations). The AfT initiative however requires a better assessment of its outcomes and impacts in terms of trade performance, poverty reduction, growth and development (...).

This following study is a “meta-evaluation” of the way aid agencies evaluate and assess their trade-related operations – and was undertaken as part of the OECD’s broader efforts to improve the effectiveness of aid-for-trade. It focuses on 162 evaluations of operations in two countries - Ghana and Vietnam - and two sectors - transport and storage - between 1999 and 2010. In particular, it looks at whether trade was a true objective of the operations under scrutiny, and whether trade and development outcomes were evaluated. More broadly, it asks whether the evaluations selected offer the information that policy makers in charge of international aid want – and need - to get from field evaluators.

2
vues

0
téléchargements
Les pays ACP doivent donc prendre une initiative dans l’intérêt de leur développement. Se tourner vers l’Europe n’a guère de sens actuellement : pourquoi espérer de l’Europe un geste que la Commission s’obstine à ne pas faire ? Reste un forum que les pays ACP devraient explorer, celui de l’Organisation Mondiale du Commerce (OMC). Cette note examine ce que les pays ACP pourraient faire dans le cadre des négociations de Doha en cours.

Publié en 2007-11-18 Collection GEM Working Paper
4
vues

0
téléchargements
The ACPs should take an initiative—a ‘Plan A+’. The note explores what could be envisaged in the Doha Round context. The ACP could offer a better access to their markets to the non-EU WTO Members for being allowed by these countries to limit the forthcoming preferential liberalization towards the EU. An attractive, mutually beneficial, Doha-consistent ACP offer would consist in the ACPs cutting substantially their bound tariffs, and modestly their applied tariffs. As bound tariff cuts substantially reduce the current huge uncertainty in trading with the ACPs, they will generate new trade opportunities, more diversified ACP economies, and better regional trade agreements between the ACPs willing to do so. In short, they will deliver a much more progressive and balanced liberalization of the ACP economies than the one envisaged by the current EPAs. Such an offer is attractive to non-EU WTO Members—from China to the US. These countries are unlikely to be pleased by ACP markets being open to EU firms while remaining closed to their own firms. The note also explores ways for the ACP countries to conclude ‘Interim Agreements’ with the EU in 2007—without preempting an attractive, Doha-consistent solution by hasty decisions taken in the EPA context.