Co-auteur
  • CHAI Andreas (3)
  • IACOPETTA Maurizio (2)
  • BRADLEY Graham (2)
  • GAFFARD Jean-Luc (2)
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  • Article (14)
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  • Working paper (1)
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As the actions of individuals contribute substantially to climate change, identifying factors that underpin environmentally-relevant behaviors represents an important step towards modifying behavior and mitigating climate change impacts. This paper introduces a sequential model in which antecedent psychological and sociodemographic variables predict climate change risk perceptions, which lead to enhanced levels of response efficacy and psychological adaptation in relation to climate change, and ultimately to environmentally-relevant behaviors. The model is tested and refined using data from large national surveys of Australian and French residents. As hypothesized, in both samples, risk perception (indirectly), response efficacy (both indirectly and directly), and psychological adaptation (directly) predicted behavior. However, these effects were stronger in the Australian than in the French sample, and other unexpectedly strong direct effects were also observed. In particular, subscribing to a “green” self-identity directly predicted all endogenous variables, especially in the French sample. The study provides valuable insights into the processes underlying environmentally-relevant behaviors, while serving as a reminder that effects on behavior may be nation-specific. Strategies are recommended for promoting pro-environmental behavior through the enhancement of a green identity, response efficacy, and psychological adaptation.

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization Publié en 2020-02
ZYLBERSZTEJN Adam
HANAKI Nobuyuki
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We experimentally investigate how much value people put in observable information about others in strategic interactions. The incentivized experimental task is to predict an unknown target player’s trustworthiness in an earlier hidden action game. In Experiment 1, we vary the source of information about the target player (neutral picture, neutral video, video containing strategic content). The observed prediction accuracy rates then serve as an empirical measure of the objective value of information. In Experiment 2, we elicit the subjective value of information using the standard stated preferences method (“willing- ness to accept”). While the elicited subjective values are ranked in the same manner as the objective ones, subjects attach value to information which does not help predict target behavior, and exaggerate the value of helpful information.

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The diffusion of social media has radically changed the number of peers with whom consumers interact with when making a decision. While consumption decisions depend on many factors, such as prices, qualities, distribution channels, and marketing, in this article, we study the effects of a single aspect: the role of the number of social connections in shaping consumers’ decisions. We present an agent-based simulation model where virtual consumers respond solely to information provided by peers from their social network. We obtain that increasing the number of connections consumers rely upon to gather information changes radically the distributional properties of markets where consumers cannot obtain direct information about the available options, such as experience goods. In particular, we show that increasing the number of connections among consumers increases the concentration of the top- and low-end market share options, sharply decreasing the number of “midsized” options. This effect is in line with evidence from markets for movies and music, which rely heavily on information gathered through peers.

À l'heure où la grogne monte, où les promesses de manifestation se multiplient, force est de constater qu'au-delà des solutions technologiques attendues et des politiques de soutien à l'innovation verte, la préservation de notre environnement passera forcément par une modification de nos habitudes les plus profondément ancrées. Ce Policy Brief présente les résultats d’une étude sur la connaissance des Français du changement climatique, sur leurs valeurs et les comportements adoptés comme réponses à celui-ci. Les résultats dressent le profil d’une nation inquiète au sujet du changement climatique, mais encore trop peu mobilisée. Le sentiment d’efficacité de nos actions est faible et l’idée est très répandue que la responsabilité d’agir face au changement climatique incombe aux autres (aux entreprises, aux gouvernements et à la communauté internationale) plutôt qu’aux individus eux-mêmes. Ces résultats laissent entrevoir des défis réels mais surmontables pour mobiliser les Français dans une révision durable de leurs comportements. Nous proposons trois recommandations qui devraient accompagner ce défi : ■ Premièrement, pour favoriser la prise de conscience de chacun, toute action de communication doit apparaître comme locale et concrète. Aussi, l’élaboration d’un plan d’action national pour une communication sur le changement climatique, toute campagne de publicité, aussi ambitieuse soit-elle, doit nécessairement se décliner aux spécificités locales. Une approche globale, uniforme et indifférenciée nous semble vouée à l’échec ; ■ Deuxièmement, il faut mettre en place un observatoire de la perception du changement climatique. Cet observatoire doit avoir pour objectif l’élaboration de plans de lutte contre les obstacles à l’innovation comportementale individuelle. Nous recommandons d’exploiter les événements climatiques extrêmes à des fins d’information, ceux-ci ayant un très fort impact sur la volonté des individus de réagir face à ce changement ; ■ Troisièmement, la réduction de l’écart entre la perception des risques et les comportements vertueux doit se baser sur l’action individuelle, et donc sur la responsabilisation de tout-un-chacun. Toutefois, la responsabilisation individuelle doit être appuyée par des propositions concrètes sur les comportements vertueux à suivre dont la publicité doit être assurée par la puissance publique.

in Technological forecasting and social change Publié en 2018-12
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The rise of modern digital communication technologies, most notably electronic social networks, transforms structures through which consumers interact with one another. In this paper we distinguish between two channels through which product promotion affects sales. The direct channel always positively affects consumers' pre-purchase valuation. The indirect channel goes through word-of-mouth (WoM) and can be either positive or negative. The sentiment contained in WoM is generated by the complex interaction process and depends on the aggressiveness of the advertising campaign. We investigate the implications of the current changes in social network architectures for the effectiveness of the indirect channel. We show that changes in social structures have increased the efficiency of WoM across a host of industries. Our results call for “smart” advertising policies

in South Eastern Europe Journal of Economics Publié en 2018-09
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I argue that the impact of piracy engines for scholarly content on science depends on the nature of the research. Social sciences are more likely to reap benefits from such engines without inflicting much damage on journal publishers’ revenues. To validate the claim, I examine the data from illegal downloads of economics content from Sci-Hub over a five-month period. I conclude that: (a) the extent of piracy in economics is not pervasive; (b) downloads mostly occur in under-developed countries; (c) users pirate even content that is freely available online. As a result, publishers are n

Publié en 2018-06
BRADLEY Graham
CHAI Andreas
DIETZ Thomas
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Responding to climate change is the greatest challenge facing humanity today (IPCC 2014). Climate change poses risks for human and natural systems via processes such as water scarcity, land degradation, habitat and biodiversity loss, and extreme weather events. In Southern France, climate change has been directly linked to recent flooding and is projected to increase the future frequency of storms and heatwaves (Beniston et al. 2007). Understanding how citizens perceive and psychologically adapt to climate change is of great importance to developing a coherent and effective strategy to reduce carbon emissions and greater climate resilience. This national survey represents the most comprehensive survey of national climate change attitudes in France to date. It presents and discusses national survey findings from a collaborative and cross-national research project undertaken by the Université Côte d'Azur and Griffith University (Australia) examining public risk perceptions, understanding and responses to the threat and unfolding impacts of climate change in France. The national survey was undertaken between June 5th and July 17th, 2017 and involved a representative, geographically and demographically stratified national sample of 3480 respondents across France. The results provide an up-to-date and comprehensive profile of current French attitudes and beliefs about climate change, their concerns about the impact it may have on their economic well-being, health and natural surroundings, and the ways in which they are responding psychologically and behaviorally to this threat. This report also uncovers how economic conditions and natural weather events impact the evolution of climate change perceptions and attitudes. These results highlight that the design of public communication strategies in relation to climate change adaptation should take into account the nature of these public perceptions of climate change.

Examining the regional distribution of 15 different Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Practices (MPs) across Australia, we study the tendency for consumers to imitate visible pro-environmental behavior in their local region. While there is a great deal of variation in the specific type of MPs adopted by consumers located in the same region, ANOVA results suggest that they tend to adopt a similar number of MPs as their neighbours. Using discrete choice modelling, our results suggest that this is due to the peer adoption of certain visible MPs, such as using public transport or car-pooling, encouraging agents to adopt other types of visible MPs. However, the character of this spillover is limited in that visible pro-environmental behavior does not appear to influence the adoption of non-visible MPs. We also find that social imitation patterns help individuals overcome the observed gap between their stated concern about climate change and their propensity to act on this concern, known as the climate ‘value-action’ gap. Policy implications for designing effective green nudges are discussed.

in International Journal of Computational Economics and Econometrics Publié en 2017-01
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This paper examines the link between consumer interaction and innovation performance of firms. Consumer interaction is modelled as a network effect: consumers adapt their tastes in order to take into account the popularity of the submarket the product is traded on. Consumer interaction is shown to result in higher innovation incentives during the transitional dynamics for two types of industries. However, across these industries the firms benefiting from higher incentives are different. In one case larger firms are the ones gaining from consumer interaction, in the other case smaller firms collect gains.

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