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Compte rendu de l'ouvrage de Richard Youngs, Europe’s Eastern Crisis: The Geopolitics of Asymmetry, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 256 pages.

This article examines the nature and implications of the emerging EU–Russia competition in their common neighbourhood. After analysing the two economic integration platforms that the EU and Russia are respectively promoting in the postsoviet space, the Eastern Partnership (EaP) and the Eurasian Economic Union, the discussion focuses on the case study of Ukraine. It is argued that depicting this emerging regional configuration as a geopolitical contest between two cohesive blocs was not fully corresponding to the reality on the ground but that it largely turned into a self‐fulfilling prophecy in the case of Ukraine.

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Studies on foreign policy think tanks have too often remained disconnected from the analysis of foreign policy outcomes. Yet, investigating the development, functions and influence of think tanks can provide valuable insights into the context in which foreign policy is formulated. The Czech Republic and Poland represent interesting comparative cases in this regard: while Polish think tanks are more numerous and tend to be better placed in international rankings, they are less involved in the policymaking process than their Czech counterparts. This contrast has mainly to do with the sociology of foreign policy elites and the role of political parties in both countries.

Sous la direction de LE GLOANNEC Anne-Marie, IRONDELLE Bastien, CADIER David Publié en 2013-04
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This report focuses on selected international security areas. At the theoretical level, it discusses new approaches to security dominated by multiplicity and complexity, with a special emphasis on three emerging concepts that have been increasingly used in security studies: globalization, human security and securitization. At the empirical level, it first looks at the a number of new security challenges, namely terrorism, health pandemics, international migration, environmental security, and energy security; assesses the impact of these challenges on the broader international security system; and examines the response these challenges have been given. Second, the report considers the changes to the international security system brought about by the rise of the BRICS. Third, it explores the changing nature of war, with an emphasis on the rise in civil wars, their relation to limited statehood and the role of external actors. Overall, the report presents an overarching analysis of developments in international security that will shape the way the subject is understood and approached in coming years.

David Cadier est spécialiste des questions de politique étrangère, en contrat au CERI depuis le mois de mars 2018 dans le cadre du projet EU-LISTCO (Horizon 2020), qu’il coordonne avec Christian Lequesne. Il enseigne à la Sciences Po Paris School of International Affairs (PSIA) et il est associé au centre LSE IDEAS de la London School of Economics (LSE). Ses recherches portent principalement sur l’analyse de la politique étrangère (Foreign Policy Analysis), l’Europe centrale et orientale, et les relations entre l’Union Européenne et la Russie. 
David a accepté de répondre à nos questions sur son parcours, le projet qu’il coordonne et les prochaines élections européennes. Propos recueillis par Miriam Périer

in Carnegie Europe Publié en 2019-01-10
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Governing populists overprioritize domestic politics, indulge in “undiplomatic” diplomacy, and yield to conspiracy theories. The implications for EU foreign policy cannot be underestimated.

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Since the outbreak of the Ukraine crisis in 2014, the idea that the EU and Russia are engaged in a geopolitical contest over their common neighbourhood and that the Eastern Partnership (EaP) is Brussels’ instrument in this context appears ‘common sense’. Yet, the reality of the EaP as a policy programme hardly corresponds to such representation, whether in its original purpose, actual content or effects on the ground. To unpack this discrepancy, this article presents a genealogy of what is conceptualised here as the geopoliticisation of the EaP, a notion set forth to designate the discursive construction of an issue as a geopolitical problem. While Russia’s actions in Ukraine certainly contributed to deepen and reinforce this dynamic, the article shows that the geopoliticisation of the EaP was neither merely exogenous nor simply reactive. It was also carried forward from within the European policy community by a discourse coalition which, based on its own political subjectivities and policy agenda, came to frame the EaP as an endeavour aimed at ‘winning over’ countries of the Eastern neighbourhood and ‘rolling back’ Russia’s influence.

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This edited volume analyses the evolution and main determinants of Russia's foreign policy choices. Containing contributions by renowned specialists on the topic, the study sheds light on some of the new trends that have characterised Russia's foreign policy since the beginning of Vladimir Putin's third presidential term.

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European Union member states have been notoriously divided in their attitudes towards Russia. These national positions have, however, too often been essentialized, thereby obfuscating nuances and foregoing the possibility to discern or explain change. Considering its strong political and economic links with Russia, its past positions and the fact that Ukraine had never registered prominently on its foreign policy radar, France's reaction to the Ukraine crisis has been firmer and more active than most could have forecast. This article examines the content, determinants and evolutions of France's policies towards Russia before, during and beyond the crisis. Contrary to traditional explanations, which tend to emphasize historic, cultural, economic or domestic political factors, I argue that these policies have been mainly—and continuously—driven by France's broader milieu goals in international and European politics. These considerations help to account for the policy shift revealed during the Ukraine crisis. Following the emergence of Russia as a central actor in Syria and the correlated politicization of the Russia question in the 2017 French presidential election, the Macron administration has adopted a new diplomatic approach towards Moscow. Yet a different policy direction has not emerged, as the administration has not fundamentally put into question the previously established assessment of how Russia's current foreign policy collides with France's milieu goals.

The United States is not the only Western country in which Russia is featuring prominently in electoral politics. For the first time since the end of the Cold War, Russia is also a hot topic in the French presidential campaign. In the lead up to the election in spring 2017, nearly all of the opposition parties—whether on the right, far right, or far left—have bemoaned the degradation of ties with Russia under the government of President François Hollande, arguing that it breaks with France’s tradition of diplomatic engagement and political dialogue with Moscow and that it is detrimental to French economic interests. Some politicians from these parties have also expressed, on international issues such as Ukraine or Syria, views sympathetic to the Kremlin...

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