Co-auteur
  • SCHRADIE Jen (6)
  • PAULY Stefan (6)
  • HELMEID Emily (6)
  • SAUGER Nicolas (6)
  • Voir plus
Type de Document
  • Article (14)
  • Rapport (6)
  • Partie ou chapitre de livre (2)
  • Working paper (2)
  • Voir plus
How disruptive is Covid-19 to everyday life? How is the French population experiencing the lockdown? Is it magnifying inequalities and affecting social cohesion? The CoCo project sheds lights on these pressing questions by comparing living conditions in France before, during, and after the lockdown. This is the third of a series of research briefs. We explore how French society has coped with the first 6 weeks of the lockdown, particularly as regards the transformation of working conditions and social life. We also continue to monitor self-reported health and well-being.

Jusqu’à quel point le Covid-19 perturbe-t-il notre vie de tous les jours ? Comment la population française vit-elle le confinement ? Dans quelles mesures les inégalités sociales sont-elles exacerbées et la cohésion sociale menacée ? Le projet CoCo apporte des éléments de réponse à ces questions d’actualité en comparant les conditions de vie en France avant et après le blocage. Il s’agit du deuxième rapport préliminaire de la série que nous publierons dans les prochaines semaines. Nous analysons ici la façon dont la société française a fait face à ce premier mois de confinement, notamment en ce qui concerne les préoccupations sur l’état de l’économie, la santé et le bien-être autodéclarés, et enfin l’enseignement à la maison.

Jusqu’à quel point le Covid-19 perturbe-t-il notre vie de tous les jours ? Comment la population française vit-elle le confinement ? Dans quelles mesures les inégalités sociales sont-elles exacerbées et la cohésion sociale menacée ? Le projet CoCo apporte des éléments de réponse à ces questions d’actualité en comparant les conditions de vie en France avant et après le blocage. Il s’agit du troisième rapport préliminaire de la série que nous publierons dans les prochaines semaines. Nous analysons ici la façon dont la société française a fait face aux 6 premières semaines de confinement, notamment en ce qui concerne les changements de conditions de travail et de vie sociale. Nous continuons à surveiller les éléments de santé et de bien-être autodéclarés comme dans les 2 précédents numéros.

How disruptive is COVID-19 to everyday life? How is the French population experiencing the lockdown? Is it magnifying inequalities and affecting social cohesion? The CoCo project sheds light on these pressing questions by comparing living conditions in France before, during, and after the lockdown. This is the second of a series of research briefs that we will publish in the forthcoming weeks. In this brief, we explore how French society has coped with the first month of the lockdown, particularly with the economy, self-reported health and well-being, and homeschooling.

How disruptive is Covid-19 to everyday life? How is the French population experiencing the lockdown? Is it magnifying existing inequalities and affecting social cohesion? The CoCo project sheds light on these pressing questions by comparing living conditions in France before and after the lockdown. This is the first of a series of research briefs that we will publish in the forthcoming weeks. We will explore this new experience of “sheltering-in-place” and its impact on family life, schooling, work, health and well-being. This brief explores how French society has coped with the first two weeks of the lockdown. We find that the virus has rapidly become a tangible threat, as more than forty percent of the population knows someone who has been infected. Despite this, three out of four persons say that they do not feel overly stressed out. In certain cases, the reaction has been almost philosophical -- long hours spent at home allow people to slow down and think about the meaning of life. More than anything else, it is having access to green spaces and nature which provides some relief to those attempting to cope with this home-based social organization. Still, some cracks have appeared. Women, foreign-born residents, and individuals facing financial hardship are subject to greater emotional strain than the rest of the population. Gender inequalities have been particularly reinforced during the lockdown: women have been spending even more time than usual cleaning and taking care of others. Although the Covid-19 virus tends to disproportionately strike men, the consequences of the lockdown more intenselyaffect women.

Jusqu’à quel point le Covid-19 perturbe-t-il notre vie de tous les jours ? Comment la population française vit-elle le confinement ? Dans quelles mesures les inégalités sociales sont-elles exacerbées et la cohésion sociale menacée ? Le projet CoCo apporte des éléments de réponse à ces questions d’actualité en comparant les conditions de vie en France avant et après le blocage. Il s’agit ici du premier d’une série de rapports préliminaires que nous publierons dans les prochaines semaines. Nous étudierons l’impact de cette nouvelle expérience du confinement à domicile sur la vie familiale, la scolarité, le travail, la santé et le bien-être. Ce rapport est consacré à la manière dont la population française a fait face aux deux premières semaines de confinement. Nous constatons que le virus est devenu rapidement une menace tangible : environ quatre personnes sur dix connaissent quelqu’un qui a été infecté. Malgré cela, les trois quarts de la population; française déclarent ne pas se sentir trop stressés. Dans certains cas, cette expérience est vécue avec philosophie : les longues heures passées à la maison permettent de ralentir le rythme et de réfléchir au sens de la vie. Plus que tout, c’est l’accès à la nature et aux espaces verts qui soulage ceux qui tentent de s’adapter à une organisation sociale désormais centrée sur le domicile. Pourtant, des fissures transparaissent. Les femmes, les personnes nées à l’étranger et les individus confrontés à des difficultés financières sont soumis à des tensions émotionnelles plus fortes que le reste de la population. Les inégalités entre les sexes ont été renforcées pendant le confinement : les femmes consacrent encore plus de temps à nettoyer et à prendre soin des autres. Bien que le Covid-19 ait tendance à frapper davantage les hommes, les conséquences du confinement affectent plus intensément les femmes.

The article reviews the available quantitative evidence on the relationship between explicit family policy and women's employment outcomes in 45 high‐income countries between 1980 and 2016. At the methodological level, we gathered 238 papers through a four‐stage systematic qualitative review. We included articles published in English in international journals or by leading research institutes. Despite the accrued importance of the field, comparative works and national case studies do not sufficiently engage one another for methodological and disciplinary reasons. Our contribution is to integrate the findings from both streams of the literature in two ways. First, we chart systematically the debate describing its evolution over four decades, the disciplines involved (demography, economics, politics, social policy, sociology, and interdisciplinary work), and the geographical and policy breadth of the empirical contributions. Second, we provide a rich guide for scholars in the field by exploring how national case studies fit (or not) the broad trends captured in comparative research and discussing key and controversial debates in the field. In conclusion, we point out also important gaps in the literature and propose new avenues for future research. An exhaustive set of tables provides information on each comparative and national case study and on the databases and variables employed in the literature.

This article presents a new theoretical and empirical approach to understand family policy expansion in relation to the political economy of welfare state retrenchment and social reproduction in 23 OECD countries. From a Polanyian perspective, this expansion can be interpreted as a movement toward commodification and liberalization, and a countermovement of gender liberation. The first movement seems to characterize family policy expansion as a tool to foster neoliberal capitalism and the advent of a Schumpeterian Workfare State, conspiring with welfare state retrenchment to encourage employment within an environment of growing precarization. The second movement appears to assuage the social reproduction crisis. This countermovement seems to act as a cushion to soften the shift from a male income earner toward a dual earner model, supporting working parents in meeting escalating childare costs. Looking at the expansion of childcare spending and the retrenchment of minimum income guarantees for couples with children, an empirical illustration of this concomitant ‘double movement’ reveals that the first holds sway over the second in most countries. Furthermore, household income and maternal levels of education impact on childcare usage, magnifying the negative distributional consequences of cutting minimum income guarantees in favor of childcare.

23
vues

23
téléchargements
During the past two decades, the debate over the relation between family policy and women’s employment in high-income countries has grown in prominence. Nevertheless, the evidence proposed in different disciplines – sociology, politics, economics and demography – remains scattered and fragmented. This article addresses this gap, discussing whether family policy regimes are converging and how different policies influence women’s employment outcomes in high-income countries. The main findings can be summarized as follows: family policy regimes (‘Primary Caregiver Strategy’, ‘Choice Strategy’, ‘Primary Earner Strategy’, ‘Earning Carer Strategy’, ‘Mediterranean Model’) continues to shape women’s employment outcomes despite some process of convergence towards the Earning Carer Strategy; the shortage of childcare and the absence of maternal leave curtail women’s employment; long parental leave seems to put a brake to women’s employment; unconditional child benefits and joint couple’s taxation negatively influence women’s employment but support horizontal redistribution; policies and collective attitudes interact, influencing women’s behaviour in the labour market; and the effect of policies is moderated/magnified by individual socioeconomic characteristics, that is, skills, class, education, income, ethnicity and marital status. The article concludes by suggesting avenues for future research.

in L’Année sociologique Publié en 2018-10
5
vues

0
téléchargements
Durant les trois dernières décennies, les politiques familiales des pays riches ont connu un essor qui contraste avec le mouvement global d’austérité engagé par les États-providence. Les régimes de politiques familiales semblent converger progressivement vers le modèle Earning Carer et le schéma suédois – caractérisé par des dépenses élevées dans les services publics de garde d’enfants et un partage plus égalitaire des congés parentaux. Ce modèle semble aussi promouvoir la participation des femmes au marché du travail. Dans ce contexte, cet article vise principalement à discuter de ces évolutions selon les concepts que Polanyi emploie dans son ouvrage majeur, La Grande Transformation. Suivant son approche analytique, nous suggérons que l’essor des politiques familiales peut être compris en lien avec le désengagement de l’État-providence et le développement global de l’économie politique (political economy), et qu’il génère deux mouvements de sens opposés. D’un côté, l’accroissement des politiques familiales – parallèlement au désengagement de l’État-providence – semble inciter les mères à accepter plus facilement des salaires modestes dans une économie fondée sur les services. De l’autre, il contribue en partie à les libérer des activités de soins et d’accompagnement (care). Une première interprétation considère les politiques familiales comme un nouvel outil de promotion du capitalisme néolibéral, tandis qu’une seconde y voit une assistance essentielle aux parents de jeunes enfants pour surmonter la hausse des coûts de prise en charge. Ces deux phénomènes interagissent, mais sous l’impact croissant du désengagement de l’État-providence, le premier mouvement semble plus déterminant que le second.

Suivant