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  • SALAMONSKA Justyna (7)
  • FAVELL Adrian (5)
  • DEUTSCHMANN Emanuel (4)
  • BARONE Carlo (3)
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  • Article (13)
  • Conference contribution (13)
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Publication date 2019-04
DEUTSCHMANN Emanuel
VESPE Michele
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We devise an integrated estimate of country-to-country cross-border human mobility on the basis of global statistics on tourism and air passenger traffic. The joint use of these two sources allows us to (a) test for their relative contribution, and (b) correct for their limitations to the estimate of global mobility by combining them. The two sources are adjusted and merged following simple procedures. The resulting dataset, which covers more than 15 billion estimated trips over the years 2011 to 2016, promises to be a systematic and comprehensive resource on transnational human mobility worldwide. In this paper, we illustrate the data characteristics and transformations adopted in creating this dataset. First applications are explored,and its remaining limits are discussed

in MPC Blog Debate Migration (Migration Policy Center) Publication date 2019-04
DEUTSCHMANN Emanuel
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Between 2011 and 2016 alone, individual cross-border travels on planet Earth increased by 25 per cent. In absolute numbers, an estimated 2.9 billion international trips occurred worldwide in 2016 by air, land or water transportation — around 600 million more than five years earlier. This estimate stems from a novel dataset created by the Global Mobilities Project (GMP) at the EUI’s Migration Policy Centre (MPC), in collaboration with the Knowledge Centre on Migration and Demography (KCMD) of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre: the Global Transnational Mobility Dataset.

in Innovation Publication date 2014
RECCHI Ettore
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This article argues that there are two distinct logics that underlie existing studies on European identification. These are grounded in models of collective identity formation that stress either messages inscribed in discursive processes or practices situated in socio-spatial relations – respectively, the “culturalist” and the “structuralist” models. The first of these models considers identification as a direct outcome of the exposure to content-specific symbols, narratives, and messages; the second, as an emerging property of socio-spatial interactions that are content-free of identity references. The first is logocentric, while the second is democentric and topocentric. This article focuses particularly on the second and less-developed research tradition which explores the effects of cross-national practices. The limits and potential of this model are discussed, setting an agenda for empirical research aiming to better elucidate the causal dynamics of European identity formation and adjudicate between these competing explanations.

in Politics Publication date 2016-08
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While migration has always existed, and its consequences have always been important, few people have lived a mobile life in the history of mankind. Population immobility has recurrently been part and parcel of political strategies of social control and domination. Since the second half of the 20th century, however, the extent of geographical movements of individuals has expanded enormously. In particular, the size and scope of international travel has increased at an exponential pace. Favored by globalization and technological progress, transnationalism, initially linked to migration, has emerged as a relatively widespread phenomenon that involves a growing portion of the general population, especially, but not only, in developed countries. Mainly on the basis of research carried out in Europe, there is evidence that transnational practices tend to strengthen cosmopolitanism and the legitimacy of supranational polities (particularly the European Union [EU]), while it is less clear whether they entail denationalization. Further research is needed to improve the quality of independent and dependent variables in this area and assess the effect of international mobility and transnationalism outside the European context. [Abstract's publisher]

in Sociologia Publication date 2014
RECCHI Ettore
GRIFONE BAGLIONI Lorenzo
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Dalla Scuola Ecologica di Chicago ai giorni nostri, l’esercizio prevalente della ricerca sociologica applicata alla convivenza di gruppi etnici diversi si traduce in declinazioni articolate di percorsi e modalità di ‘integrazione’. Al termine di una breve rassegna di tali paradigmi interpretativi, si propone una definizione ‘minima’ di integrazione delle minoranze etniche immigrate: l’integrazione come ‘migration neutrality ’ – ossia, l’irrilevanza dell’origine nazionale come predittore dell’accesso degli individui alle risorse economiche, di prestigio e relazionali di una società (i capitali economico, culturale e sociale di Pierre Bourdieu). Questa definizione sgombra il campo da perigliose derive culturaliste circa la ‘compatibilità’ tra gruppi etnici, assumendo che tale compatibilità sia tanto maggiore quanto minori sono gli scarti osservabili nella distribuzione delle risorse economiche, culturali e sociali. Data questa premessa, il paper sviluppa un’analisi empirica su due fronti. Da una parte, svolge un’analisi secondaria dei dati Eurostat sull’integrazione degli immigrati negli stati membri dell’Unione Europea. Successivamente, si interroga sul rapporto tra politiche dell’integrazione ed effettiva integrazione, mettendo in relazione i dati Eurostat appena menzionati con gli indici Mipex che misurano le politiche di integrazione degli stati europei. I paesi con le ‘migliori pratiche’ di intervento sono anche quelli che massimizzano la migration neutrality, in particolare sul fronte dell’esclusione sociale? Le analisi mostrano che, in chiave comparativa europea, la relazione tra politiche di integrazione e rischio di esclusione sociale tra gli immigrati non è lineare ed esige una riflessione maggiore sia sugli strumenti di analisi che sulle dinamiche effettive che legano politiche e diseguaglianze sociali tra nativi e immigrati.

in Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies Publication date 2016-11
DUBUCS Hadrien
PFIRSCH Thomas
SCHMOLL Camille
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Italy has experienced a new wave of population outflows, in particular since the end of the 2000s, with France as one of the top destinations. This paper investigates the structural and socio-cultural integration of Italian migrants in Paris. The paper is based on a mixed-methods approach, using in-depth interviews, census data and an online survey. We found that the profile and incorporation patterns of post-crisis migrants reflects a long-term trend of middling migration out of Italy. Similar to other studies, we show that current Italian migrants are prevailingly highly skilled and employed in non-manual jobs. As for socio-cultural integration, the paper highlights the symbolic value of the host city, to which migrants are strongly attached. Moreover, the longer the Italian’s stay in Paris, the higher his/her integration in Italy-oriented activities, both within Paris and in Italy. This indicates a complex incorporation model that is at odds with assimilation but at the same time departs from ethnicised and community-based patterns. Italian migrants combine being both Parisian and Italian in a ‘synergistic balancing act’ (Erdal and Oeppen 2013. ‘Migrant Balancing Acts: Understanding the Interactions between Integration and Transnationalism.’ Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 39 (6):867–884.) of integration and transnationalism.

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In this article we discuss the concept of European solidarity by distinguishing between transnational and international solidarity. The former refers to support for institutional arrangements aimed at sharing economic risks at the individual level, while the latter entails public agreement to share economic risks at the Member State level. We explore the joint role of cross-border interactions and political attitudes in fostering solidarity ties among Europeans through multilevel modelling based on the 2012 Eurobarometer 77 survey. The article shows that transnational experiences do not have the same effect on different forms of European solidarity, limiting transnational and enhancing international solidarity. Egalitarian individuals are more prone to EU-wide solidarity, with cross-border practices affecting their level of solidarity, while not altering those of the rest of the population. In particular, we find that cross-border practices make egalitarians more inclined to international and less to transnational solidarity.

Publication date 2014-07
SALAMONSKA Justyna
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Social stratification research on leisure tends to focus on class differences in cultural consumption patterns.In this literature, seldom is travelling taken into account as a dependent variable, even if international journeys are exponentially rising worldwide. But how is the experience of travelling sorted across social strata? Do they increase linearly as we move up the social hierarchy, as a reflex of higher income and cultural capital? Or are they more than proportionally an elite prerogative, while the bulk of the population keeps nation-wide travel horizons? And are there societal differences in the association between social class and travelling? In addition, this paper investigates differences in meanings of travels. We thus expand the cultural-sociological debate on the social stratification of cultural tastes to mobility behaviours. Is international travelling a form of ‘omnivorous’ consumption, to use the famous concept of Peterson, for the better off and most educated? Is it meant to incorporate holidays, business and sociability experiences among the upper class, while being more focused and limited in scope among lower classes? Do these differences help characterize class-specific cultural capitals, thus fostering class reproduction? We address both sets of questions – the social stratification of the quantity and quality of mobility experiences – by analysing the distribution of national and international travels across social strata with data from the EUCROSS survey, covering six EU countries (Denmark, Germany, Italy, Romania, Spain and the UK. Preliminary analyses of EUCROSS data suggest that SES is an important predictor of mobility experiences; however, there are differences in motives of travels. Higher SES is associated with more travel for both holidays and professional trips. Furthermore, travelling patterns vary significantly depending on the countries from which they originate.

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