Type de Document
  • Article (566)
  • Communication non publiée (408)
  • Partie ou chapitre de livre (402)
  • Compte-rendu d’ouvrage (106)
  • Voir plus
Centre de Recherche
  • Centre de sociologie des organisations (1827)
  • Centre de sociologie des organisations (CSO) (28)
  • Sciences Po (21)
  • Centre d'études européennes et de politique comparée (15)
  • Voir plus
Discipline
  • Sociologie (1726)
  • Science politique (292)
  • Histoire (119)
  • Education (82)
  • Voir plus
Langue
  • Français (1298)
  • Anglais (524)
  • Espagnol (11)
  • Allemand (10)
  • Voir plus
Publié en 2020-05 Collection Notes de l'Institut Rousseau
7
vues

0
téléchargements
L’activité partielle constitue un des dispositifs les plus anciens de la politique publique de l’emploi. Ce dispositif à caractère préventif répond aux intérêts de plusieurs groupes sociaux. Du côté des salariés, il évite leur paupérisation, leur déqualification et la perte de statut social qu’engendre le chômage total. Toutefois, cet équilibre entre groupes sociaux se disloque dans la crise du Covid-19, où les usages de l’activité partielle apparaissent particulièrement ambigus et problématiques. Cette situation appelle une réforme de l’activité partielle, pour l’adapter aux enjeux contemporains et aux défis à venir. Cette note présente les limites du dispositif en termes de couverture, d’indemnisation et de contrôle des abus avant d’en proposer plusieurs pistes de réformes.

in Le Monde diplomatique Publié en 2020-04
7
vues

0
téléchargements

44
vues

0
téléchargements
Will contemporary societies be able to transform themselves in the coming transitions (socioeconomic, political, ecological, demographic)? This book argues that to answer this question we need to look at contemporary societies as organizational societies (Perrow, 1991). Organizations are important because policy, whether public or private, is designed, implemented and evaluated through them. Organizations are thus tools, but “tools with a life of their own” (Selznick, 1949). Understanding how they operate is not trivial. Our organizational societies create a new kind of technocratic social order constructed through social engineering in which digital platforms – both private and public – increasingly engage, reformatting individual and collective activities. Large-scale changes and reorganizations are in the making by public authorities using digitalization of social control and efficiency afforded by hegemonic and private technology companies. To track these changes, it is important to better understand how these powers operate. This means taking into account the fact that our societies are in a contradictory situation: they have rationalized and bureaucratized themselves so much that power to steer these transformations is now concentrated in the hands of small elites of owners, managers, politicians and technocrats who control these large-scale organizations that were not meant to navigate such transitions. Short of a special kind of revolution, in which organizations carrying out routine tasks are themselves transformed, organizational societies will not be able to transform themselves. How to think about this special kind of revolution is the purpose of this book. In an organizational society, whether through violent impositions or less violent negotiations, at some point social change requires what Reynaud (1989) called joint regulation. To understand joint regulation, it is not sufficient to look at organizations as bureaucracies trying to flexibilize themselves. Joint regulation is not a bureaucratic process but a political one, whether micro-, meso- or macropolitical. We argue that, in order to understand joint regulation, we need to redefine organizations as political communities combining both bureaucracy and collegiality. Instead of proposing possible standalone alternatives to bureaucracy, a second and orthogonal, collegial ideal type must be acknowledged and combined with the first, well-known Weberian bureau-technocratic ideal type. Once this redefinition of organizations as combined bureaucracy and collegiality is accepted as a starting point, sociology of organizations provides a more accurate account of how actors activate collective agency – of coordination between routine work with innovative work, of organizational transformations trying to balance, for their members, both stability and innovation in societal change and transitions. To redefine organizations and steer the sociology of organizations in this direction, we first drastically simplify sociological knowledge on bureaucracy – often presented as the default model of organization in modern societies – and its critique, and on collegiality and its critique. The first carries out routine tasks, with hierarchical coordination and impersonal interactions; the second carries out non-routine tasks and develops innovation with coordination among peers based on deliberation, committee work and personalized relationships, forming relational infrastructures that peers use to navigate these deliberations. We then look at how the two ideal types combine in organizational “stratigraphies”– that is, in an already bureaucratized world where “collegial pockets” and strata always represent various forms of oppositional solidarity. Chapter 2 proposes a multilevel, stratigraphic approach to this combination in which predominantly bureaucratic or predominantly collegial strata coordinate and synchronize across different timescales in order to increase their respective influence in joint regulation. This stratigraphic and multilevel coordination in joint regulation is further described with the concepts of bottom-up collegiality, top-down collegiality and, finally, inside-out collegiality. Social change is presented as the outcome of the permanent struggles between the two logics in joint regulation. In these dynamics, multilevel relational infrastructures are shown to play a central role. Multilevel relational infrastructures redefine the notion of position by considering “pairs” of individuals / organizations as a specific unit of analysis, thus specifying at least two kinds of patterns. The first is that of vertical linchpins – that is, individual actors who are present and active on at least two levels of collective action – tuning action at one level with action at another level. This position in the structure often involves leadership and managerial responsibilities, sometimes even brokerage roles (Burt, 2005) at each of the levels. This pattern creates an often relationally exhausting privilege for the individual, especially in polarized and conflictual strata or settings, but it concentrates enormous influence and mobilization capacity within and across levels. Vertical linchpins are not just horizontal brokers between individuals or even between two organizations; they are activators of multilevel collective agency and synchronizers between these levels of collective agency, often between two kinds of collective agency: one bureaucratic and one collegial. They can avoid the small but disabling bureaucratic knots or bottlenecks by short-circuiting obstruction with their spanning of strata. They are present and active as political managers at two levels simultaneously, which is an advantage in terms of capacity to manage and shape cross-level collective action, especially if one level is collegial. An example can be found, in science, in the case of the “big fish in the big pond” – that is, scientists who are both recognized individuals at the level of individual networks and directors of their laboratory when the latter is a central organization in the interorganizational network of laboratories involved in scientific research in a given field – for example, cancer research (Lazega, Jourda, Mounier, & Stofer, 2008). Other examples are provided by supercentral actors who are sought out for advice by many peers in a new market, and who are at the same time affiliated in organizations that can structure the market by shaping competing consortia of contractual activities (Richard, Wang, & Lazega, forthcoming). The second pattern is what we call multilevel social niches – that is, subsets of “pairs” of individuals/organizations that occupy a common position in the division of work of at least two strata of collective agency. Structurally equivalent individuals (in the interindividual network) affiliated to structurally equivalent organizations (in the interorganizational network) concentrate resources and capacity of coopetition that others cannot reach. An example of this phenomenon is provided by the case, already mentioned above, of the multilevel blocks among cancer researchers. In this case, competing laboratories of hematologists-immunologists must share interorganizational resources (equipment, funding, tissues, personnel, etc.) and set up a social context in which individuals affiliated in them can both perceive each other as direct competitors and seek advice from each other (Lazega, Bar-Hen, Barbillon, & Donnet, 2016). This relationship between multilevel relational infrastructure and coopetition will return in most of our examples and in all chapters. Multilevel and multiplex, interactional and relational infrastructures are key for coopetition and its relational work because they make it possible for individuals to jointly manage, at their interindividual level, tensions and conflicts created by cut-throat competition at the interorganizational level, and the other way around. Interorganizational-level interactional structures can create a context in which destructive personal rivalries characterizing collegiality can be socially managed. Just as social network analysis was necessary to understand collegiality and its cooperation among rival peers, the analysis of multilevel networks is necessary to understand coopetition. The concepts introduced to redefine organization as a stratigraphic combination of bureaucracy and collegiality are then used to revisit the theory of the rapports between the organization and its environment. They help to look at the nature of multilevel relational infrastructures between organizations to account for how joint regulations are affected by the co-constitution of organizations and their environment (Chapter 3). Especially across organizations, collaboration between members of different organizations allows members to access resources and skills in order to exploit opportunities. But this collaboration across organizations is often difficult because these organizations also compete and institutions supporting cooperation between them are not always sufficient on their own to enforce their own norms. This is where such multilevel relational infrastructures are necessary as determinants of coopetition. Specific kinds of vertical linchpins at the interorganizational level are often identified as “big fish in big ponds”, and social change presented as organized to catch up with them. A specific mechanism, “network lift from dual alters”1 – that is, a multilevel extension of opportunity structures – is presented as a condition for such changes when they benefit from specific multilevel Matthew effects. We argue that sociology of organizations analyzing organizations in these terms strengthens and expands our knowledge of this joint regulation as a set of social phenomena that should be taken into account in the current transitions. The implications of this stratigraphic and multilevel approach to activation of organized collective agency are then explored in the fields of political economy (Chapter 4), social stratification (Chapter 5) and the current platform digitalization of society (Chapter 6). The latter further bureaucratizes the world by framing personalized relationships in the language of impersonal interactions and by parametrizing social processes in collegial settings, thus attempting to neutralize its many forms of oppositional solidarity and innovative capacity. Focusing on this neutralization, a revisited organizational sociology should help explain the ways in which digitalization of relational life pushes technocratic bureaucratization of the world much further, with the risk of slowing down if not stifling innovation, neutralizing institutional entrepreneurship – thus shaping social changes and transitions without deliberation, accountability and democracy. Beyond the workplace, this evolution extends to the community, a social change introducing “commons inside out” (Chapter 6). The key issue here is that this digitalization based on the use of big relational data not only standardizes individual behavior, but also collective life. Understanding how it transforms organized collective action in workplaces, markets, communities and politics requires the new understanding of joint regulation mentioned above. Indeed, digitalization often triggers public debates that rightly focus on individual privacy issues and protections. For example, increasingly, the systematic knowledge of the private personal networks of interactions and relationships of billions of individuals can be merged with no less systematic information on these persons’ attributes (i.e., psychological traits, socioprofessional characteristics, economic resources), career paths, tacit knowledge exchanges, work and leisure activities, consumption decisions, perplexity logs (Lazega, forthcoming), and, finally, production outputs, since we upload them to “the cloud”, making them available for higher-level strata to merge and use. It is also important to stress that the existence of this systematic knowledge base raises issues that go beyond individual privacy. It also concerns all forms of emergent collective agency and organization produced by combined bureaucracy and collegiality. In other words, these new platforms accumulating data based on traces left by everyone’s digitalized activities also increasingly build models of society and private sociologies that facilitate new forms of social engineering. They increasingly use knowledge of organizations, collective mobilizations and institutional entrepreneurship for political objectives – for example, concentration of powers in the hands of collegial oligarchies at the top of the bureaucratic pyramids – not just for building academic knowledge. We focus in Chapter 7, the concluding chapter, on this form of digital bureaucratization as a major risk for joint regulation, undermining the capacity to create social innovations needed in contemporary transitions, and ultimately democracy itself. Chapter 6 shows that without new forms of joint regulation at all levels and across levels, these transformations will only take into account the interests of the very few, not those of the many. The right combinations between bureaucracy and collegiality, policy field by policy field and across fields, will need to be created and activated for contemporary societies to be able to transform themselves – especially as democracies – for these transitions.

in Confinements . Regards et expériences de chercheur-es en SHS Publié en 2020-04
0
vues

0
téléchargements

in La Règle et le rapporteur. Une sociologie de l’inspection Sous la direction de BRUNIER Sylvain, PILMIS Olivier Publié en 2020-04
DEMONTEIL Marion
11
vues

0
téléchargements
Dans ce chapitre, nous proposons une analyse du travail des inspections générales ministérielles en entrant dans la matérialité de leurs écrits, et plus particulièrement au travers des listes des personnes auditionnées inclues dans les rapports. Prêter attention à la manière dont les inspecteurs rendent comptent – ou non – de ces interactions permet de ne pas réduire la relation inspecteur/inspecté à une forme de face-à-face. Chaque mission est au contraire conçue comme un processus itératif visant à sélectionner et agréger un certain nombre de points de vue. Conformément à l’orientation générale de l’ouvrage, entrer par les listes suppose d’envisager l’inspection comme une relation non seulement descendante, visant principalement le contrôle de l’application de la règle, mais aussi ascendante, permettant de faire remonter des informations vers les commanditaires du rapport – le plus souvent le cabinet du ministre. Cette double perspective permet ainsi d’interroger le renouvellement du rôle de ces services au cours des trente dernières années. Les transformations de l’action publique qui visent à resserrer l’administration centrale sur la stratégie et le pilotage de services morcelés, ont en effet recentré les inspections sur un travail de coordination des services [Bezes, 2005], et incité à une homogénéisation des pratiques d’inspection autour de la question de l’évaluation [École nationale d'administration, 2015]. Analyser qui sont les interlocuteurs des missions d’inspection représente ici une entrée originale pour étudier les conséquences de ces réformes sur les pratiques ordinaires des inspecteurs généraux. Quelle signification donner au fait d’être présent sur une liste des personnes auditionnées ? Qui sont ces personnes qui se trouvent être « dans les petits papiers » des inspecteurs ? Comment les inspecteurs contribuent-ils, par le processus même d’écriture de leurs rapports, à cadrer les problèmes qu’ils ont à traiter ? [premier paragraphe]

in La règle et le rapporteur. Une sociologie de l’inspection Sous la direction de BRUNIER Sylvain, PILMIS Olivier Publié en 2020-04
15
vues

0
téléchargements
Bien que peu évoquée, l’Inspection du travail est au cœur de l’invention, des transformations et des réformes, y compris récentes et d’ampleur, du Code du travail. Les inspecteurs sont en effet essentiels dès lors qu’un corps de règles spécifiques s’élabore pour réguler les relations de travail et s’impose aux parties contractantes, employeurs et salariés, qu’il s’agisse de limiter la durée du travail, d’instaurer un salaire minimum, de respecter des règles d’hygiène et de sécurité, ou de faire fonctionner des instances de représentation du personnel. De nombreux travaux ont étudié ce corps et ses pratiques, y compris récemment [Szarlej, 2017 ; Bonanno, en cours, voir son chapitre dans cet ouvrage]. Certains de ces travaux ont porté sur le corps de l’inspection du travail, de sa création comme « voltigeurs de la république » [Viet, 1994] à l’analyse de ses transformations morphologiques dans les années 1970, sous l’effet d’une forte politisation de la fonction [Reid, 1994] ou en s’intéressant aux inspectrices au XXe siècle [Schweitzer, 2017]. D’autres travaux ont porté sur les pratiques d’inspection, en insistant sur leur rôle en matière d’accès au droit [Cam, 1986 ; Willemez, 2017], sur les usages du droit que développent les inspecteurs en matière de santé et sécurité au travail [Dodier, 1988 ; 1989], de temps de travail [Pélisse, 2004], ou eu égard à leurs missions et leurs formations [Justet, 2013]. Les réformes qui ont touché ce corps et ses pratiques ont aussi fait l’objet de recherches, par une entrée comme l’évaluation des risques [Tiano, 2003a], ou celles concernant la santé et la sécurité, et les transformations de l’autonomie et de la légitimité de la fonction d’inspection [Mias, 2015]. On s’en tient, qui plus est ici à la seule littérature française, qu’on peut élargir, comme le font Borraz, Merle & Wesseling [2017] en comparant les inspecteurs du travail à ceux des installations classées et vétérinaires, ou en étudiant les inspections du travail étrangères [voir Piore & Schrank, 2008]. Ce champ déjà balisé laisse toutefois des zones, sinon des continents inexplorés que ce chapitre propose d’arpenter. Ainsi, comment cela se passe-t-il dans la fonction publique ? Qui contrôle l’application de la réglementation du travail des fonctionnaires ? Ces derniers, définis avant tout par un statut et des règles à part, au point qu’il est inexact de parler de salaire ou de retraite pour les caractériser, font-ils l’objet d’une inspection spécifique ou au contraire généraliste ? Qui contrôle l’État-employeur ? [premiers paragraphes]

in La règle et le rapporteur. Une sociologie de l'inspection Sous la direction de PILMIS Olivier, BRUNIER Sylvain Publié en 2020-04
15
vues

0
téléchargements
L’Inspection du travail en France constitue un objet abondamment étudié par les sciences sociales. Des travaux ont fait l’histoire de cette administration en montrant qu’elle illustre les ambiguïtés des politiques d’encadrement du développement industriel depuis plus d’un siècle, qui à la fois le promeuvent et cherchent à limiter les effets délétères qu’il induit pour la santé des populations [Dhoquois-Cohen, 1993 ; Reid, 1994, 1995 ; Viet, 1994]. Dans une perspective inspirée de la sociologie du droit, d’autres travaux ont fait de l’Inspection du travail un cas d’étude de la bureaucratie d’État au concret et de la manière dont est négociée la traduction des règles légales dans les activités sociales [Dodier, 1986, 1988 ; Tiano, 2003a ; Mias, 2015]. Enfin, en s’inscrivant dans une sociologie de l’État attentive aux dynamiques de managérialisation de l’action publique [Bezes, 2009], des recherches mettent en évidence la perte progressive d’autonomie des inspecteurs du travail [Szarlej et Tiano, 2013 ; Szarlej-Ligner, 2016 ; Mias 2015 ; Borraz, Merle et Wesseling, 2017]. Pour l’essentiel, ces travaux se sont intéressés aux services d’inspection dépendant directement du ministère du Travail, chargés d’inspecter les entreprises relevant du régime général (industrie et services). Pourtant, le contrôle de l’application du droit du travail a été historiquement pris en charge par des services d’inspection multiples, dont les frontières ont varié au cours du temps [Szarlej-Ligner, 2017]. En se focalisant sur le seul régime général, la plupart des travaux sur l’inspection du travail négligent par construction le poids des conflits de territoires entre administrations centrales dans l’évolution de leur objet. Dans cet article, nous proposons précisément d’éclairer une partie de cette infrastructure institutionnelle, à partir du cas de l’Inspection du travail agricole, de sa naissance à la fin des années 1930 à sa mort en 2009. [premiers paragraphes]

En prenant pour objet une mesure de politique publique de lutte contre l'obésité, cet article met l'accent sur les conditions de construction de la confiance dans un dispositif d'action publique. Celles-ci sont d'autant plus exigeantes quand, comme dans le cas étudié des chartes d'engagements volontaires de progrès nutritionnels, un instrument d'action publique a vocation à initier des dynamiques marchandes. Loin d'être garantie par le seul soutien des pouvoirs publics, l'efficacité d'un tel outil dépend aussi, de façon décisive, de sa capacité à assurer l'alignement des intérêts des parties qu'il met aux prises (pouvoirs publics, mais aussi acteurs économiques industriels). Cet alignement des intérêts est néanmoins mis à mal par un travail de gestion du dispositif qui, guidé par le souci de préserver sa réputation, mine son efficacité en contribuant régulièrement au désalignement des intérêts des parties.

Depuis la fin de l’année 2019, l’épidémie de coronavirus s’est muée en pandémie mondiale. Initiée dans la province de Hubei, elle s’est répandue en quelques semaines dans la plupart des pays de la planète. Au 9 avril 2020, un million et demi de personnes sont officiellement infectées – certaines estimations jugent la proportion décuplée – tandis que 100 000 personnes en sont décédées. Près de 3 milliards d’individus connaissent une situation de confinement, afin de ralentir la diffusion de l’épidémie et d’éviter la saturation des services hospitaliers. (premier paragraphe)

Sous la direction de BRUNIER Sylvain, PILMIS Olivier Publié en 2020-04 Collection Sciences Sociales
39
vues

0
téléchargements
Scandales sanitaires, violences policières, pollution environnementale, manquements au Code du travail, évaluation de telle politique publique… tous suscitent la mobilisation de services d’inspection. Leur convocation régulière ne les exempt pas de critiques : tatillons, ils entraveraient la bonne marche de l’économie ; déconnectés du terrain, ils incarneraient un pouvoir bureaucratique sourd aux revendications ; soumis à l’autorité d’une tutelle, ils « blanchiraient » délibérément des inspectés fautifs. Les contributions réunies dans cet ouvrage montrent que les services d’inspection n’ont pas qu’un nom en commun mais que leur activité en fait des intermédiaires entre des inspectés et des donneurs d’ordre. Inspecter consiste aussi bien à faire la lumière sur le déroulement et les causes de certaines crises, qu’à contrôler, de manière plus routinisée, la conformité des pratiques d’acteurs et privés avec un ensemble de règlementations et de règles. L’inspecteur n’est pas seulement celui qui vérifie que les inspectés appliquent la règle, il se fait également le rapporteur de ce qu’ils lui ont donné à voir.

in Futures Past Sous la direction de FRITSCHE Ulrich, KÖSTER Roman, LENEL Laetitia Publié en 2020-04
10
vues

0
téléchargements
The chapter claims forecasting is a process during which forecasts are regularly updates and revised. Paying attention to the dynamics of expectations provides the opportunity to study changes in expectations formed by professionals, and thus give insights into how their labor unfolds. Drawing upon data from a purposelybuilt database of forecasts running from September 2006 to September 2017, linear and logistic regression models investigate the informational and organizational grounds of forecasts revisions. It suggests that similar forecasts form a consistent sequence, so that revisions mostly consist in the adjustments of ‘old’ forecasts with respect to newly available information. By and large, forecasting means updating former forecasts. Besides, data shows the core activity of forecasting organizations, and in turn their audience, matter to understand the extent to which they revise their forecasts: despite what forecasters claim in interviews, public institutions, among which the IMF or the OECD, tend to revise their forecasts on a wider scale than private banks or insurance companies. Eventually, scrutinizing how forecasts revisions distribute according to the years during which they are produced, stress that during major economic crises, such as the Great Recession, forecasters not only revise their former expectations downward but also upward. This hints at a Durkheim-inspired interpretation of economic crises as re-opening the future.

in La règle et le rapporteur Sous la direction de BRUNIER Sylvain, PILMIS Olivier Publié en 2020-04
3
vues

0
téléchargements
Inspecter, pour quoi faire ? Au cours des dernières années, chaque scandale a fait ressurgir cette question. Qu’il s’agisse de lasagnes frauduleusement farcies à la viande de cheval, du maintien sur le marché du Mediator par les autorités sanitaires, de l’usage d’une grenade offensive par les forces de l’ordre ayant causé la mort de Rémi Fraisse, l’inspection est systématiquement convoquée pour faire la lumière sur les événements, leurs causes, les défaillances des services voire les fautes des personnes, les éventuelles responsabilités et les conclusions à en tirer. Sa mission est de collecter des informations nouvelles permettant de révéler les causes d’un dysfonctionnement grave à l’intérieur d’un domaine d’action publique. Dans ce contexte de crise, les critiques adressées à l’inspection se concentrent sur sa probité et dénoncent sa partialité, en remettant en cause la capacité des inspecteurs à émettre une parole indépendante de leur autorité de tutelle et/ou de ceux qu’ils inspectent. Ainsi, à l’été 2019, la noyade de Steve Maia Caniço après une intervention de la police le jour de la fête de la musique à Nantes entraîne la saisine de l’Inspection générale de la police nationale (IGPN), afin d’enquêter sur le déroulement des évènements et de déterminer si des violences policières ont eu lieu. Publiées dans la presse, les conclusions du rapport de l’IGPN suscitent de vives critiques au motif que l’institution policière étant juge et partie, il n’est guère étonnant qu’elles exonèrent en bloc les forces de l’ordre de toute responsabilité. Pour répondre aux mobilisations, le Premier ministre, revendiquant sa « volonté de transparence totale » missionne l’Inspection générale de l’administration (IGA) pour conduire une nouvelle enquête, dont le périmètre est étendu aux pouvoirs publics et aux organisateurs de l’événement. Pour exceptionnelle qu’elle soit, cette situation montre que la critique d’un service d’inspection n’équivaut pas à délégitimer le recours à l’inspection en tant que telle. [Premier paragraphe]

Créée en 1800 sous le Consulat, la Banque de France constitue dès lors un environnement institutionnel remarquablement stable, qu’il s’agisse des missions qui lui sont confiées (la distribution de crédits à l’économie et, rapidement, le monopole d’émission monétaire) ou de sa structure de gouvernance qui, fixée par ses statuts fondamentaux (décret impérial du 16 janvier 1808) n’évolue pas jusqu’aux réformes du Front Populaire en 1936 qui accroissent le contrôle des pouvoirs publics sur ses opérations [Asselain, 2011]. Parallèlement, le développement des activités de la Banque sur l’ensemble du territoire français l’amène à se doter d’un réseau de succursales. Débattue dès 1802 [Prunaux, 2009a], sa mise en place débute en 1808, et son organisation est réglée cette même année aux termes du décret impérial du 18 mai. Dans son article 40, celui-ci stipule que « la surveillance particulière du Gouvernement de la Banque sur les Comptoirs d’Escompte, sera exercée par un ou plusieurs inspecteurs nommés par le Gouverneur ». Toutefois, la modestie des bénéfices réalisés dans les comptoirs, puis leur disparition entre 1818 et 1836, justifie la suppression du poste d’inspecteur en 1812, un an à peine après sa création effective, et bientôt de la fonction elle-même. À partir du milieu du XIXe siècle, la Banque de France absorbe les banques départementales qui, couvrant le territoire, contribuait paradoxalement à son morcellement en en faisant une juxtaposition de marchés du crédit relativement étanches : ceci achève l’institution de la Banque de France comme banque centrale [Leclercq, 1999]. Cette unification monétaire et bancaire suppose la réapparition des succursales, puis leur multiplication. Rendant peu réaliste la pratique de visites inopinées et irrégulières par les membres du Conseil général, elle conduit au rétablissement de l’inspection en 1852. [Premier paragraphe]

in Preventing food losses and waste to achieve food security and sustainability Sous la direction de YAHIA Elhadi Publié en 2020-03
YAHIA Elhadi
6
vues

0
téléchargements
Consumers account for a significant amount of food waste globally. In Europe and North America, for example, half of food losses and waste (FLW) happens at the consumer level. Researchers have identified a range of causes for consumer food waste. Studies indicate that the social context of food practices, such as changes in household composition, eating habits, the proportion of consumer budgets spent on food, are among the factors that play a key role. The food industry contributes to consumers discarding food through package design, confusing date labels, inappropriate portion sizes, and marketing schemes that encourage over-purchasing. Most interventions to reduce food waste at the consumer level have focused on educating consumers and raising awareness, but the evidence for their effectiveness still needs to be demonstrated. More effective campaigns need to address multiple factors shaping consumer behavior and integrate these initiatives into an overall restructuring of the food system to limit overproduction and waste.

in Revue française de science politique Sous la direction de RUIZ Émilien, BORRAZ Olivier Publié en 2020-03
31
vues

0
téléchargements
Pour une sociologie des rouages de l'action publique-Le gouvernement par la performance entre bureaucratisation, marché et politique-Une sociologie comparée des marchés du travail administratifs-Les collectivités françaises entre autonomie et régulations étatiques-Ressaisir la centralisation à partir de la périphérie Etudier les rouages administratifs de l'action publique pour mieux comprendre l’État : c’est ce que propose le dossier thématique de ce numéro, qui rend compte d’un colloque organisé par le Centre de sociologie des organisations (CSO) à l’occasion de son cinquantenaire. Loin d’une simple visée commémorative, ses contributions offrent un regard transversal sur les métamorphoses contemporaines de l’État. Une troisième édition de la chronique bibliographique sur l’ethnographie politique vient enrichir cette livraison.

in The Routledge International Handbook of Financialization Publié en 2020-02
0
vues

0
téléchargements
Since the end of the 1990s, the idea that all responsible governments must promote financial education policies has been spreading, nationally and internationally. This need is backed up by a repetitive narrative: because of economic instability, the increased role of financial markets in household finances, and the withdrawal of the welfare state, individuals face increasing risks. To address these risks, they must improve their financial literacy, in order to make the most informed choices and transform their behavior. Individuals therefore seem to stand alone against financial risks, with states, backed by financial companies and non-profit organizations, providing them merely with informational tools. In 2015, the OECD counted 59 countries that had implemented national strategies to enhance financial literacy (OECD 2016). The rise of financial literacy is a successful example of the construction of a public problem, carried out by political entrepreneurs using cognitive and semantic strategies.

in Débats du LIEPP Publié en 2020-02
DESCHAMPS Pierre
ARBOGAST Mathieu
143
vues

0
téléchargements
Quel peut être l’effet de l’introduction de quotas face aux inégalités de genre dans l’enseignement supérieur et la recherche ? Dans une étude récente, Pierre Deschamps s’est intéressé à l’impact de la mise en place depuis 2015 d’un quota de 40% de femmes dans les comités de sélection à l’université en France. Il s’est appuyé sur des données administratives sur 455 comités académiques et 1548 candidates appartenant à 3 universités publiques françaises. Publiés dans le Working paper n°82 du LIEPP « Gender Quotas in Hiring Committees : a Boon or a Bane for Women », les résultats de cette étude interrogent la conception et les effets des politiques d’égalité dans l’enseignement supérieur et la recherche. En effet, si le quota est effectivement respecté, la progression de la proportion de femmes dans les comités semble s’être accompagnée d’une diminution des chances de recrutement des femmes candidates. Ces conclusions ont fait l’objet d’une discussion interdisciplinaire lors d’un « Débat du LIEPP » organisé le 5 avril 2019. Prenant appui sur des travaux de droit et de science politique, Anne Revillard est revenue sur l’origine et les objectifs des réformes instituant le quota. Marie Sautier a mis en perspective les résultats de cette étude à partir d’une analyse sociologique des mécanismes de production des inégalités de genre. Représentant la Mission pour la place des femmes au CNRS, Mathieu Arbogast a pointé les obstacles spécifiques à la mise en œuvre des quotas dans le monde de la recherche, et présenté plusieurs pistes de réformes dans le prolongement de ces travaux.

Cet article apporte une contribution à l’analyse des obstacles à la lutte contre la discrimination à l’embauche, en s’intéressant à ce qui concourt à renforcer la défense des employeurs. Prenant appui sur les réclamations déposées au Défenseur des droits entre 2013 et 2015, l’auteure explore les dossiers qui ont donné lieu à la mise en cause d’employeurs publics ou privés. Elle s’intéresse à la manière dont ils sont évalués par le Défenseur, aux récits et pièces livrés par les réclamants et les mis en cause, en mettant l’accent sur ce qui bénéficie à ces derniers. Partant de l’hypothèse d’une fragilité des décisions de recrutement, l’auteure montre comment celle-ci contribue à affaiblir l’établissement de la preuve de la discrimination. Elle met en évidence l’insistance des employeurs dans la valorisation de leurs bonnes pratiques et leur propension à se focaliser sur la personnalité du réclamant pour décrédibiliser son récit et ses compétences. Elle souligne les marges de manœuvre dont disposent les employeurs pour reconstituer l’opération de recrutement incriminée et définir les exigences requises par le poste.

7
vues

0
téléchargements
Reprenant l’ambition du programme lancé en 1964 par le Centre de sociologie des organisations (CSO) pour étudier empiriquement l’administration française, le présent numéro entend démontrer tout l’intérêt que revêt aujourd’hui une étude de l’État par son administration, en complément d’une entrée par la sociologie de l’action publique. En revenant sur les flux et reflux de cette approche en France depuis le milieu des années 1960, en pointant les apports et les limites des travaux menés dans le cadre du programme « L’administration face au changement », cet article introductif plaide ainsi pour une sociologie des rouages de l’action publique. C’est par une approche transversale et transsectorielle, tant au niveau central qu’à l’échelle territoriale, qu’il est possible de saisir les questions de permanence et de changement, mais également de répondre à la question : qu’est-ce qui fait tenir l’État ?

Cet article constitue la première livraison d’une étude quantitative en trois volets, consacrée aux personnes ayant obtenu le diplôme de l’une des quatre formations françaises en conservation-restauration de niveau I entre 1975 et 2018, ci-après dénommées « les diplômées » compte tenu du caractère très majoritairement féminin de cette population.1 Le premier volet décrit la répartition de cette population (N = 1 719) par formation, sexe et spécialité. Les deux prochaines livraisons, qui seront publiées ultérieurement, porteront sur l’emploi des diplômées au 1er janvier 2020.

0
vues

0
téléchargements
Cet article porte sur l’artiste havrais Raymond Gosselin (1924-2017). La première partie présente sa biographie, de sa jeunesse ouvrière dans le Cotentin à sa reconnaissance au Havre, alors ville communiste. D’abord peintre et dessinateur, il réalisa ensuite des sculptures métalliques. La seconde partie s’intéresse à ses sculptures faites de pièces automobiles. Elle s’appuie sur une enquête menée en mars 2018 au Mans, où le sculpteur avait réalisé en 1986, à la demande du comité d’établissement de l’usine Renault, une sculpture en collaboration avec des ouvriers du site. Le responsable du comité d’établissement de l’époque et trois des ouvriers qui y avaient travaillé ont été rencontrés. La mémoire émoussée de cette histoire, le destin de la sculpture elle-même, retournée à la fonte, font un écho à l’évolution de ce site industriel aujourd’hui en crise. À travers ce cas, c’est à une réflexion sur les rapports entre l’art et l’usine et, plus généralement, sur les projets de démocratisation de l’art du xxe siècle qu’invitent les auteurs.

72
vues

0
téléchargements
The popularity of labels as tools of government is growing in many policy areas. This working paper focuses on the creation and the implementation of three different public labels in the public health field. Granted by the States or other public authorities, those labels reward distinctively organizations for their contribution to a public cause. Governance by labels relies on the mechanisms of market competition and of social distinction at play within a field, to orient actors towards opinions that governments consider to be in the public interest. This working paper nevertheless shows the difficulties to implement effectively that kind of soft policy tools: for them to affect firms and consumers' behaviours, they have to integrate many conflicting objectives and interests at the same time, which is rarely the case. We actually show, in our three case studies, that governing the market through labels implies governing the labels themselves, by carefully selecting their grantee, promoting them to both consumers and companies, and struggling against other challenger labels or market intermediaries. It is not an uncommon paradox that these labels that are entrusted with such a high power of "changing the world", have been finally stripped of any power.

The popularity of labels as tools of government is growing in many policy areas. This chapter focuses on the creation and implementation of one specific kind of label, which we have defined as a “rewarding label”. These labels are granted by governments or public authorities and reward organizations for their contribution to public welfare. Governance by rewarding labels relies on the mechanisms of competition and social distinction at play within a given field, in order to orient actors towards options that governments consider to be in the public interest. Taking eco-labels and nutritional charters as case studies, this chapter shows the difficulties involved in governing through this tool. Rewarding labels are designed to satisfy a range of conflicting objectives and interests and their application has become a site of conflict among public authorities and private actors. Four limitations to this approach are highlighted: management of labels’ reputations, consumer enrolment, competition between companies, and competition between government labels and other market devices or actors.

1
vues

0
téléchargements
Alors que le projet de Loi de programmation pour la recherche (LPPR) n’a pas encore été rendu public, il suscite déjà d’importantes contestations. Des motions ont été prises par les instances de représentation des chercheurs et des enseignants chercheurs, des pétitions publiées et des manifestations organisées pour protester contre les orientations de la loi. Se répète une séquence désormais bien instituée depuis 2006, où la préparation et la mise en œuvre des réformes de l’enseignement supérieur et la recherche s’opèrent dans un climat de contestation. [premier paragraphe]

À la suite des enquêtes dans les beaux quartiers (Pinçon & Pinçon-Charlot, 1989), c’est une enquête aux marges de ces derniers qui conduit Kévin Geay à étudier les rapports au politique des classes supérieures, qualifiées par le terme générique de « bourgeois ». En revisitant des lieux emblématiques de la sociologie de la bourgeoisie, le sociologue propose d’interroger l’un des grands résultats de la science politique : celui de la forte politisation des classes supérieures, du fait de leurs compétences politiques et de leur maîtrise des règles du jeu politique. Sans prendre ce résultat pour acquis, l’auteur souhaite déplacer le regard vers les situations où l’ordre social est menacé et tente d’être rétabli par les classes supérieures. En sus des entretiens conduits avec ces dernières, il étudie comment s’expriment des formes de politique ordinaire au Pré Catelan du bois de Boulogne, au Club cigares de l’Université Paris Dauphine, ou encore dans une école privée sous contrat d’un quartier parisien huppé, lieux qui font chacun l’objet d’un chapitre. (premier paragraphe)

in La Vie des Idées Publié en 2020-01-24
ZIMMER Alexandre
CÉNAC Peggy
13
vues

0
téléchargements
Les politiques publiques françaises concentrent les moyens de recherche sur quelques “sites”, aux dépens de régions entières, creusant les inégalités entre universités dites “d’élite” ou “de masse”. Mais de nombreux travaux empiriques démontrent l’inefficacité d’une telle concentration des moyens.

in Routledge Handbook of Food Waste Sous la direction de REYNOLDS Christian, SOMA Tammara, SPRING Charlotte, LAZELL Jordon Publié en 2020
BARNARD Alex
3
vues

0
téléchargements
Recent movements against food waste, seen as an issue in and of itself, build on a much longer tradition of movements around food waste, which use unsellable but still edible food—which we call “ex-commodities”—both as a material resource for activist projects and a symbol to denounce other social and ecological ills. In this chapter, we examine three movements—Food Not Bombs, freeganism, and Disco Soupe—that publicly reclaim and redistribute ex-commodified food. Despite this superficially similar activity, they attach different meanings to that food that show the shifting politicisation of food waste over the last decades. We reveal that as movements have narrowed their framings and targeted food waste specifically as a problem, they have also narrowed the horizons of what impacts tackling food waste could actually have. Yet, it is partly through de-politicising the use of food waste that movements have gained access to policy-making and changed markets, in a context where governments, businesses, and charities have all endorsed the fight against food waste.

The development of platform capitalism and the digitization of labor processes have enabled scholars and the public to describe the contemporary organization of work giving particular emphasis to the role of algorithms. Through document analysis, interviews, participant observation and a direct work experience in two Amazon distribution centers, the article argues against the myth of the algorithmic organization of work. In order to do so, it proposes questioning the centrality of algorithms in management, locating them within a broader system of rules and practices. Rather than relying on concepts such as algocracy (Aneesh, 2006, 2009), the article tries to retrive and revisit the ideal type of bureaucracy in a «Pluralist» meaning (Gouldner, 1954; Burawoy, 1979; Edwards, 1979), putting it to the test of empirical analysis of the labor process. Keywords: labor process, algorithmic management, platform capitalism, bureaucracy

6
vues

0
téléchargements
L’actualité du référendum, comme technique et procédure possible visant à développer la démocratie sociale, est constante depuis le début de l’année 2016. De l’avant-projet de loi qui fuite dans la presse en janvier cette année-là au projet de loi discuté au Parlement et fortement contesté dans la rue, en passant par les consultations qui ont lieu durant l’été 2017, ouverte après l’élection d’Emmanuel Macron à la présidence de la République, puis la promulgation et la ratification des ordonnances à l’automne, le référendum d’entreprise a constitué l’un des enjeux centraux des controverses qui ont entouré les récentes réformes du droit du travail en France. (premières phrases)

  Suivant