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  • CLOTEAU Armèle (2)
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Publié en 2015-06
FRASZ Dana
MORRIS Hanna
ABBE Ruth
REHBERGER Emily
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California's Silicon Valley is one of the wealthiest places in the United States where job growth, income, and venture capital flourish at or near record highs. Despite these positive trends, many people in the region are struggling just to get enough food. In Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties 1 in 4 people and 1 in 3 children are at risk of hunger and food stamp participation in the region hit a 10-year high in 2012. Meanwhile, 40% of all food produced in the US is wasted. The reality of hunger and wasted food is costly to the environment, the economy, and the health of our communities. The costs of uneaten food and empty bellies are often hidden but are significant. Each year hunger costs our nation $130.5 billion in health care for hunger-linked medical issues, $19.2 billion in reduced educational and workplace productivity, and $17.8 billion of charitable contributions to address hunger, totaling to $167.5 billion per year. In California, the cost of hunger was $19.6 billion in 2010. Meanwhile, the US spends $165 billion each year on food that just gets thrown away and then pays $750 million each year for its disposal. Wasted food is a disaster for the environment too as it wastes valuable resources like water and energy and is the third largest greenhouse gas emitter globally behind China and the US.

in The Conversation.fr Publié en 2016-03
CLOTEAU Armèle
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Des montagnes de fruits et de légumes comestibles mis en décharge aux invendus remplissant les bennes des supermarchés, le « gaspillage alimentaire » fait parler de lui. En France, une loi a même été votée en février 2016 pour lutter contre ce phénomène. C’est à travers des chiffres, des kilos voire des tonnes jetés régulièrement, que ce problème ancien est devenu aujourd’hui un véritable enjeu politique.

in Discovery society Publié en 2016-09
BARNARD Alex
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The series of practices for acquiring, preparing, and cooking with “waste” – as well as, occasionally, re-wasting it – reveals how the ethical commitment of turning waste into food creates challenges for adopting other ethical practices.

in The Practice of the Meal Publié en 2016-04
BARNARD Alex
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On a Wednesday night in May 2012, Janet, a 45-year-old high school Spanish teacher, and Jonathan, a 25-year-old self-described anarchist and full-time activist, are washing and cutting courgettes in the kitchen of a cosy apartment in Queens, New York. As they work, they chat amicably about how best to prepare the vegetable stir fry and debate over whether the meal should be vegan. Around them, ten othen people are helping with the preparation. This scene is reminiscent of the classic American potluck, where each participant brings a dish to share or ingredients to prepare with the others, except for one key difference: the night before, all of the food being prepared has been at the bottom of 50-litre dark plastic trash bags, placed on the pavement and destined for the landfill. This meal started where other meals usually end: disposal. (first paragraph)

This paper explores how the same tactic - serving free, surplus food in a public space - can have various meanings and draw on distinct "repertoires" of collective action (Tilly, 2000) for different activist groups. The study is based on the movements Food Not Bombs in the US and Disco Soupe in France.

in Envisioning a future without food waste and food poverty Publié en 2015-11
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How have recent public policies, corporate initiatives, and mobilizations around ‘food waste’ impacted? How excess food is valued and subsequently managed in France and the USA? This research draws on more than 150 qualitative interviews, observations and document analysis of an emerging ‘food waste movement’ in Europe and the USA in 2013-2015, bringing together actors involved in a wide range of organizations in the food and waste system. I find that different actors and organizations view ‘waste’ in different ways depending on their divergent interests in the production, (re)distribution, consumption and disposal of food. Despite endorsing a hierarchy of preferable solutions – prevention, recovery, and then recycling – in practice these actors establish three hierarchies based on environmental, social and economic values. These hierarchies create competition both within and between distinct solutions that are not necessarily compatible. I show that recycling and recovery are dominant solutions because they offer clear equivalences with economic goals, often overlooking long-term environmental and social impacts. Although current initiatives engage in only ‘weak’ prevention, and thus only create marginal changes in how food is valued and managed, I argue that these mobilizations nonetheless have the opportunity to create more structural changes in food and waste systems.

Actualisation du "benchmark international des politiques de lutte contre le gaspillage alimentaire" publié dans le rapport parlementaire de G.Garot en avril 2015

in Switchboard - Natural Resources Defense Council Publié en 2015-05
BERKENKAMP Jo Anne
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You have to hand it to the French. They can make just about anything sound exotic - even food waste. Also known as "gaspillage alimentaire", food waste sounds better in French and its future looks a whole lot better too due to some bold policy moves across the pond. (First paragraph)

in La deuxième vie des objets (DVO) - Anthropologie et sociologie des pratiques de récupération Publié en 2018-12
BARNARD Alex
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Définition de "Freegan"

In April 2015, French policymakers released ambitious proposals for a national policy against food waste, offering a rich set of ideas for prevention, recovery and recycling.1 Some measures, including a ban on supermarket food waste, have already entered the legislative process, and others may follow. Because the original, 75-page report, “Fighting Food Waste: Proposals for a Public Policy,” is not currently available in English, NRDC requested this distillation of key elements of the report.2 This write-up summarizes each of the 36 proposals. The proposals are the result of a yearlong study housed within the Ministries of Agriculture and the Environment. They reflect a collaborative process, led by Parliament member Guillaume Garot, that drew upon input from 120 experts and stakeholders. Their report calls for 36 regulatory and policy measures across the French food system. If these proposals are approved and implemented, they will place France on the cutting edge of the fight against food waste internationally.

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