Texte intégral
  • Non (1147)
  • Oui (399)
Type de Document
  • Article (488)
  • Partie ou chapitre de livre (348)
  • Communication non publiée (311)
  • Livre (82)
  • Voir plus
Centre de Recherche
  • Centre de sociologie des organisations (1536)
  • Sciences Po (18)
  • Centre d'études européennes et de politique comparée (14)
  • Institut de recherche interdisciplinaire sur les enjeux sociaux (CNRS/EHESS/INSERM/P13) (IRIS) (11)
  • Voir plus
Discipline
  • Sociologie (1448)
  • Science politique (236)
  • Histoire (88)
  • Education (82)
  • Voir plus
Langue
  • Français (1070)
  • Anglais (452)
  • Allemand (9)
  • Espagnol (9)
  • Voir plus
From a neo-structural perspective, the link between anormative regulation and morphogenesis (Archer, 2016) has far-reaching implications. This chapter argues that this link sheds a strong critical light on joint regulatory processes co-driven by the two most powerful actors in contemporary organizational societies: states and businesses. It does so by looking at how specific institutional entrepreneurs, who are part of collegial oligarchies mixing public and private elites, use procedural law as ‘weak culture’ (Breiger, 2010) to produce, rank and promote specialized norms. Our setting is the emergence of the European Unified Patent Court, and the institutional entrepreneurs are intellectual property judges assembled by corporate lawyers to frame the new institution. This multilevel regulatory process is represented by the heuristic image of a multilevel spinning top and is shown to be close to institutional capture.

This chapter offers a neostructural perspective on how organized mobility and relational turnover (OMRT) constitute important dimensions of the social context in which social mechanisms are deployed. They determine many of the characteristics of those mechanisms. As an illustration, White [HC. Chains of opportunity: system models of mobility in organizations. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, (1970)] analysis of “mobility in loops” (p. 380) is combined with Snijders [TAB. “Models for longitudinal network data”. In: Carrington PJ, Scott J, Wasserman S (eds) Models and methods in social network analysis. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 215−247, (2005)] models of network dynamics to look at how rotation across a carrousel of organizational places and subsequent relational turnover create a relational infrastructure that shapes a social process such as collective learning. Using a longitudinal study of advice networks among lay judges at the Commercial Court of Paris as an empirical example of collective learning, the author draws on a “spinning-top model” to account for the dynamics of these networks, in particular their cyclical centralization and decentralization over time, with OMRT in the Court providing the energy that drives this evolution and process. A “dynamic invariant” and its outcome, stability from movement, are thus identified at the heart of collective learning but are also shown to have an intrinsic multilevel character with consequences for catch-up dynamics between superimposed levels of agency. It is suggested that a neostructural perspective can thus inspire new collaborations between sociology and geography.

9
vues

0
téléchargements
This paper is the text prepared for the keynote address of the EUSN 2017 conference in Mainz, Germany. A short presentation of concepts reflects in part the foundations of neostructural sociology (NSS) and its use of social and organisational network analyses, combined with other methodologies, to better understand the roles of structure and culture in individual and collective agency. The presentation shows how NSS accounts for institutional change by focusing on the importance of combined relational infrastructures and rhetorics. Specific characteristics of institutional entrepreneurs who punch above their weight in institutionalization processes are introduced for that purpose, particularly the importance of multistatus oligarchs, status heterogeneity, high-status inconsistencies, collegial oligarchies, conflicts of interests and rhetorics of relative/false sacrifice. Two empirical examples illustrate this approach. The first case focuses on a network study of the Commercial Court of Paris, a 450-year-old judicial institution. The second case focuses on a network study of a fieldconfiguring event (the so-called Venice Forum) lobbying for the emergence of a new European jurisdiction, the Unified Patent Court, and its attempt to create a common intellectual property regime for the continent. For sociologists, both examples involve “studying up”: they are cases of public/private joint regulation of markets bringing together these ingredients of institutionalization. The conclusion suggests future lines of research that NSS opens for the study of institutionalization, in particular using the dynamics of multi-level networks. One of the main issues raised by this approach is its contribution to the study of democratic deficits in a period of intense institutional change in Europe.

One way to understand the notion of Morphogenesis Unbound is to focus on the meso level of society, i.e. to look at society as an ‘organizational society’ and to think about the co-evolution of structure, agency and culture – the three dimensions of Archer’s sociology, analytically speaking – in that context. This co-evolutionary vision happens to be very close to the research program of neo-structural sociology. To illustrate this insight, one neo-structural method, multilevel network analysis through linked design, is applied to a set of empirical data so as to propose a network translation of Morphogenesis Unbound and observe its outcome. This chapter reports results in which actors create new relationships beyond the boundaries of the organization with which they are affiliated, thus reshaping/expanding their own personal opportunity structure beyond the limitations imposed upon them by pre-existing structures. Half the population of the innovators observed (here: highly competitive scientists) deploy ‘independentist’ strategies, i.e. all the new personal ties that they develop in their network among the elite of colleagues of their profession are beyond the constraining perimeter predefined by their organization’s inter-organizational network. The kind of organization that they might create would not establish inter-organizational ties with their current organization. Over time, measurements suggest that this independence takes them close to Nowhere in terms of further achievements. Slightly more pedestrian forms of Morphogenesis, i.e. perhaps less Unbound, based on a relational strategy called here ‘individualist’, in which actors keep a strong foot in the organization in which they are affiliated so as to use its resources to create a new set of ties – and eventually a new organization – outside their current organization’s perimeter, seem to be of a more rewarding kind of networks to Somewhere closer to the “prizes [that] go to those who will explore and can manipulate contingent cultural compatibilities to their advantage” (Archer 2012). In this latter case, even if some of the opportunities that they could create for themselves are hoarded by their current organization (or boss). Such neo-structural measurements of Morphogenesis are used to start thinking about situations in which the two generative mechanisms identified by Archer (2012), competition and opportunity, coexist; as differentiated from the situations in which the latter would replace the former. Indeed creating new ties with heterogeneous actors, beyond one’s current position and sometimes even new kinds of organizations, is a highly cultural form of agency. Breiger’s notion of ‘weak culture’ helps speculate about actors’ capacity to reshape opportunity structures by reaching heterogeneous alters in spite of resistance from a rather stable, change-averse, tightly-connected organizational society promoting ordinary incremental innovation that will not challenge pre-existing entrenched interests.

in economic sociology_the european electronic newsletter Publié en 2018
COMET Catherine
DELARRE Sébastien
ELOIRE Fabien
FAVRE Guillaume
MOUNIER Lise
MONTES-LIHN Jaime
OUBENAL Mohamed
PENALVA-ICHER Elise
PIÑA-STRANGER Alvaro
14
vues

0
téléchargements
This short presentation is a “go to” summary providing interested readers with indications of our development of this neo-structural economic sociology. The notion of a social discipline that is perceived as legitimate by members of a social milieu is an important notion for understanding the contemporary form of cooperation between competitors. This form of cooperation relies on two dimensions of the very general notion of social discipline. A first dimension is located at the individual level and can be observed in the relational and symbolic work previously discussed. Actors are equipped with a social rationality (Lazega, 1992), thanks to which they design common projects and invest in relationships to manage their interdependencies via multiplex social exchange. The second dimension of the notion of social discipline exists at the collective level, although it is also endogenized by individual members. We refer to this second dimension as relational infrastructures. These infrastructures include horizontal and vertical differentiations in the social milieux of interdependent entrepreneurs. Horizontal differentiations correspond to systems of niches and vertical differentiations to heterogeneous forms of status. Relational infrastructures are crucial for the deployment and steering of key social processes usually associated with collective action among interdependent peers. We focus on such processes because they can help actors in managing the dilemmas of their collective actions: collective learning and socialization, bounded solidarity and exclusions, social control and conflict resolution, regulation and institutionalization. Our methodological contribution offers models of such processes using socio-economic network analyses mixed with other methods.

in Social Networks Publié en 2016-05
BAR-HEN Avner
BARBILLON Pierre
DONNET Sophie
4
vues

0
téléchargements
This paper looks at the effect of identifying alters as direct competitors on their selection as advisors. We differentiate between two kinds of competition: cut-throat vs friendly. We argue that, unlike cut-throat competition, friendly competition makes collective learning possible as a social process: when knowledge is built in interactions that are able to mitigate the negative effects of status competition and take place in homophilous social niches; and when the quality of this knowledge is guaranteed by members with epistemic status in these niches. Social niches and status facilitate advice seeking and collective learning because advice seeking between direct competitors is not obvious even when members have a common interest in sharing advice – a learning-related dilemma of collective action. We apply this reasoning to a network dataset combining identification of direct competitors and selection of advisors among the elite of cancer researchers in France. We use a procedure of multiplex stochastic block-modeling designed by Barbillon et al. (2015) to measure the effect of these identifications of direct competitors on the structure of the advice network. Results obtained with this dataset support our theory.

in Social Networks Publié en 2015
WANG Peng
ROBINS Garry
PATTISON Philippa
1
vues

0
téléchargements
Social selection models (SSMs) incorporate nodal attributes as explanatory covariates for modelling network ties (Robins et al., 2001). The underlying assumption is that the social processes represented by the graph configurations without attributes are not homogenous, and the network heterogeneity maybe captured by nodal level exogenous covariates. In this article, we propose SSMs for multilevel networks as extensions to exponential random graph models (ERGMs) for multilevel networks (Wang et al., 2013). We categorize the proposed model configurations by their similarities in interpretations arising from complex dependencies among ties within and across levels as well as the different types of nodal attributes. The features of the proposed models are illustrated using a network data set collected among French elite cancer researchers and their affiliated laboratories with attribute information about both researchers and laboratories (0070 and 0075). Comparisons between the models with and without nodal attributes highlight the importance of attribute effects across levels, where the attributes of nodes at one level affect the network structure at the other level.

in Social Networks Publié en 2013-01
WANG Peng
ROBINS Garry
PATTISON Philippa
0
vues

0
téléchargements
Modern multilevel analysis, whereby outcomes of individuals within groups take into account group membership, has been accompanied by impressive theoretical development (e.g. Kozlowski and Klein, 2000) and sophisticated methodology (e.g. Snijders and Bosker, 2012). But typically the approach assumes that links between groups are non-existent, and interdependence among the individuals derives solely from common group membership. It is not plausible that such groups have no internal structure nor they have no links between each other. Networks provide a more complex representation of interdependence. Drawing on a small but crucial body of existing work, we present a general formulation of a multilevel network structure. We extend exponential random graph models (ERGMs) to multilevel networks, and investigate the properties of the proposed models using simulations which show that even very simple meso effects can create structure at one or both levels. We use an empirical example of a collaboration network about French cancer research elites and their affiliations (0125 and 0120) to demonstrate that a full understanding of the network structure requires the cross-level parameters. We see these as the first steps in a full elaboration for general multilevel network analysis using ERGMs.

in Multilevel Network Analysis: Theory, Methods and Applications Sous la direction de LAZEGA Emmanuel Publié en 2016
SNIJDERS Tom
2
vues

0
téléchargements
Theoretical developments and the emergence of new epistemological insights are based on interactions between old problems and new methodologies (Courgeau, 2003). At least two methodologies have helped social scientists of the past two generations in overcoming the traditional divide between individualistic and holistic approaches in the social sciences: multilevel analysis and social network analysis. The purpose of this book is to provide an exploration of the diverse ways in which these two methodologies can be brought together in statistical approaches to multilevel network analysis, specifically their combination in the development of three areas: theory, techniques, and empirical applications in the social sciences. The combination of approaches opens up new avenues of research and improves the necessary management of so-called ‘ecological fallacies’ in complex systems of inequalities: for example, when looking at problems as different as school performance of pupils or career development in labor markets. With respect to theory, this book describes the development of multilevel network reasoning by showing how it can explain behavior by insisting on two different ways of contextualizing it. The first method consists of identifying levels of influence on behavior and identifying in sophisticated ways different aggregations of actors and behaviors as well as complex interactions between levels and therefore between context and behavior. A second, more recent method of contextualization, consists of identifying different systems of collective agency as distinct levels of analysis, differentiating for example among levels of collective action with different goals; specific resource interdependencies between members; and specific social processes that help members manage dilemmas of collective action at each level. The book also provides an overview of different methodologies contributing to this perspective and case studies and datasets that explore new avenues of theorizing and modeling. Each chapter contributes to the exploration of structure in multilevel network analysis, from descriptive and inductive techniques to stochastic models (from network autocorrelation models to p2 models to ERGMs), accounting for both horizontal and vertical interdependencies. Although heterogeneous with respect to units of analysis and methods, models of multilevel network analysis presented in this volume tend to take into account a variety of structural dependencies, both within and between levels. The conclusion extends theoretical, methodological and empirical results of this new epistemology by speculating on the insights provided on our knowledge of societies that have become “organizational” societies, i.e. rationalized, managerialized, and marketized.

in Towards a Participatory Society Publié en 2018-02
6
vues

0
téléchargements
In society at large, top-down participation provided by institutional authorities, mainly in the form of dialogue and consultation, is often taken up (or even driven) by associations (for example, as part of “governance” among “stakeholders”). However, at the same time, it is often approached by the very same associations with defiance and mistrust. In contexts where asymmetries of power and inequalities are huge, the avoidance of sharing truly decisional power with weaker and nevertheless legitimate parties has been widely documented (see Fisher, 2012). For example, decisional power is rarely shared with parties such as vulnerable citizens or migrants with human rights, from different origins in need of welcome, orientation, and integration. Civil society organizations in particular, which try to locally push a broad agenda or a set of general causes, are suspicious of officials offering participation because they think they are trying to avoid the emergence of counter-powers, counting on citizen apathy, and trying to invite “anyone” to the table, short-circuiting representatives of civil society associations, by inviting only highly selected people based on clientelistic criteria and hiding purposes of social control behind co-optation (Selznick, 1949). [First paragraph]

26
vues

0
téléchargements
L’analyse des réseaux sociaux est une méthode sociologique de modélisation de systèmes d’interdépendances au sein d’un milieu social. Elle est utilisée notamment comme méthode de cartographie des flux d’échanges sociaux et économiques. À ce titre, quel que soit le phénomène social étudié par le sociologue, cette approche structurale est possible si ce phénomène a une dimension relationnelle observable de manière systématique. Elle permet d’étudier les processus fondamentaux de la vie sociale, dont les formes de solidarité, de contrôle social, de régulation et d’apprentissage sont souvent peu visibles en situation. Cet ouvrage est une introduction à cette méthode structurale essentielle en sociologie.

in Dictionnaire non standard des conventions Publié en 2016
5
vues

0
téléchargements
L’institutionnalisme en sociologie souligne, dans une perspective souvent wébérienne, l’importance des valeurs, normes et règles comme frein au comportement économique prédateur et à l’exercice brutal du pouvoir. De ce point de vue, les valeurs sont constamment débattues, contestées, redéfinies et rehiérarchisées. Les collectifs organisés évoluent en partie parce qu’ils peuvent redéfinir leurs règles de manières disjointes ou conjointes (Reynaud, 1989). Le plus fort n’impose pas mécaniquement ses valeurs, ses normes et ses règles. Les interactions entre conventions et structures deviennent donc très vite très complexes. Du point de vue d’une sociologie néo-structurale, dire qu’entre les conventions et les comportements on trouve des infrastructures relationnelles, c’est dire que la coordination par les règles requiert la mise au jour d’infrastructures relationnelles connues des acteurs et articulées à leurs identifications et choix normatifs. La gestion, par les acteurs, de leurs interdépendances fait déjà partie de la lecture organisationnelle de l’action économique. Mais les interdépendances fonctionnelles ne suffisent pas à constituer les régularités sociales que représentent ces infrastructures relationnelles. Ces dernières (modélisables comme des « niches sociales » et des formes hétérogènes de « statut social ») aident les acteurs à suspendre le comportement opportuniste. Elles relèvent de logiques de l’échange social et du choix des partenaires de cet échange, dans des processus aussi centraux que la régulation et l’institutionnalisation, mais aussi, en amont, de l’apprentissage et la socialisation, de la solidarité et des exclusions, du contrôle social et de la résolution des conflits.

Its 233 video clips offer a structured encounter with those who made organization theory. 31 of the most eminent organization theorists recount their explorations and findings, and illustrate their reasoning in interpreting the unexpected results of their seminal field-studies. Some 300 articles by 59 American and European contributors document the chronology of 17 approaches to the study of organization, providing an overview of the state of the art in the discipline. Together, these materials paint a concrete and lively picture of the progressive construction of this body of knowledge from Taylor to today.

Pour (re)découvrir l'Analyse sociologique des organisations Une question se pose dans toute organisation : qu’est-ce qui est le plus important, de la conception d’une action ou de sa mise en œuvre sur le terrain ? Tout est important. Mais, trop souvent, on n’a d’yeux que pour la conception et on oublie de regarder de près les conditions de la mise en œuvre, et pourtant c’est au moins aussi décisif... La mise en œuvre ne découle jamais des qualités du projet. Le projet est une chose, sa réalisation en est une autre, qui échappe au contrôle des décideurs parce que c’est une affaire d’action collective. L’action collective est une chose compliquée. Elle fait intervenir un grand nombre d’acteurs avec leurs rationalités, leurs intérêts, lesquels s’articulent dans un ordre toujours différent de celui pensé par les décideurs. Qu’apporte un regard sociologique ? Une sensibilité aux difficultés de la mise en œuvre et une capacité de les décoder. L’analyse sociologique des organisations met l’accent sur les discontinuités dans l’action sociale : le champ social n’est pas unifié, il est hétérogène et structuré par toutes sortes d’ordres locaux, partiels… Ces ordres locaux sont le produit de l’action intelligente de tous les participants. William Foote Whyte disait qu’il avait « toujours pensé que le type en bas de l’échelle était plus intelligent que ce que ses supérieurs voulaient bien reconnaître, et que ce qui l’intéressait, c’était ces situations où des gens exclus des processus de décisions finissaient par avoir une réelle influence sur le cours des choses, et que tout cela fonctionnait. » Et bien, l’analyse sociologique des organisations exige du décideur qu’il traque cette intelligence pratique de l’homme « en bas de l’échelle » et qu’il respecte la créativité dont elle est porteuse. A ce titre, elle est une sociologie profondément démocrate... L’organisation est l’instrument que les hommes se sont forgé pour pouvoir coopérer tout en gardant un minimum d’autonomie. Bien que les apparences nous la présente comme évidente, il faut la comprendre comme une construction sociale. Prendre le point de vue de l’analyse sociologique des organisations, c’est questionner l’évidence de cette construction pour en analyser les conditions de son maintien et de son développement. Prendre le point de vue de l’analyse sociologique des organisations, c’est rappeler à l’homme d’action qui demande toujours des solutions, l’importance de la compréhension et de la capacité du diagnostic. (E. Friedberg) UNE CONFERENCE PEDAGOGIQUE PAR ERHARD FRIEDBERG, concepteur avec Michel Crozier de l'analyse stratégique Une présentation claire et concrète des concepts et des outils méthodologiques, de nombreux exemples Un cheminement structuré en 6 grands thèmes : L'organisation est un processus - Les comportements sont des stratégies rationnelles - La coopération crée des relations de pouvoir - Les relations de pouvoir ne s'arrêtent pas à l'organisation - L'organisation est le produit de jeux - Aspects de méthode) ET AUSSI un QUIZ pour tester ses connaissances (180 questions) + des articles et des fiches de lecture pour approfondir + une bibliographie thématique L'organisation, un processus Points abordés L'organisation comme processus - L’organisation est un système d'acteurs - L'organisation, le produit de jeux - Les comportements sont des stratégies rationnelles - Le comportement d’un acteur se comprend par rapport à sa situation - Chercher les régularités de comportements - Les relations de coopération sont des relations de pouvoir - Le pouvoir, un rapport d’inégalité et de réciprocité - Le pouvoir ou l’échange de possibilités de comportements - Les sources d’incertitude organisationnelles - L’entreprise dans son environnement - D’où viennent les limites dans les stratégies de chacun ? - Comprendre les règles du jeu pour mieux les modifier - Du bon usage des entretiens dans l’analyse stratégique - La restitution

in Penser la négociation. Mélanges en hommage à Olgierd Kuty Publié en 2008
0
vues

0
téléchargements

3
vues

0
téléchargements

in Observing Policy-Making in Indonesia Sous la direction de FRIEDBERG Erhard Publié en 2017
3
vues

0
téléchargements
During the last15-20 years, policy schools have become a rapid growth sector in higher education. They have grown to prominence and have profiled themselves as the agents of the rationalization and modernization of public administration and public policy-marking. (beginning)

in Dictionnaire de la pensée sociologique Publié en 2005
0
vues

0
téléchargements

in Sociologie de l’action organisée. Nouvelles études de cas Publié en 2011
2
vues

0
téléchargements
Cette publication n'a pas de résumé.

Sous la direction de FRIEDBERG Erhard, HILDERBRAND Mary Publié en 2017
3
vues

0
téléchargements
This book analyzes policy-making and implementation in Indonesia. Conducted at the School of Government and Public Policy (Indonesia), the research presented here provides original insights into the country’s public policy processes by exploring the conditions on the ground that shape implementation. The studies brought together in this volume are based on fieldwork involving interviews with various stakeholders, first-hand observations, and the collection of original documents and data. They address policy issues ranging from health insurance, district recruitment, community empowerment, and solid waste management, to tourism and the status of refugees. The result is a wealth of case-study data on policy implementation experiences in Indonesia that will benefit students, academics and practitioners alike.

in Rue Saint-Guillaume Publié en 2005-12
42
vues

0
téléchargements

Au croisement de la sociologie du changement institutionnel, du travail administratif et de l’action publique environnementale, notre thèse appréhende de façon originale la question de l’autonomie du réformateur à partir d’un suivi ethnographique sur six ans du travail quotidien de cadres intermédiaires de l’administration responsables de la mise en œuvre d’une réforme des politiques territoriales de la nature : les directeurs de parcs nationaux. Après avoir démontré empiriquement, puis théoriquement à partir de leurs spécificités, l’inertie institutionnelle particulièrement forte de ces politiques publiques, nous soutenons la thèse suivante : même dans un contexte fortement contraint, l’autonomie du réformateur existe mais n'est jamais donnée ni acquise. Elle dépend étroitement de la pratique quotidienne du travail de réforme. Le réformateur doit la construire et l’entretenir. Certaines phases de la trajectoire de transformation institutionnelle s’avèrent cruciales pour cela : son démarrage et de courtes parenthèses où le réformateur peut travailler à ce que la dynamique du processus de réforme lui-même contraste fortement avec l’inertie de la politique publique. La gestion du processus de réforme, plus que sa substance, est ainsi au cœur de la construction de l’autonomie du réformateur et de l’ouverture d’une trajectoire d’innovation. Nous en montrons les modalités pratiques autour d’un travail d’interprétation, de composition et de modélisation par lequel la lecture de l’action en cours se fait de plus en plus à travers le prisme de l’expérience collective récente (de mise en œuvre de la réforme) et moins à travers celui de l’histoire lointaine sur lequel se fonde l’inertie institutionnelle.

0
vues

0
téléchargements
Les jeux de rôles grandeur nature sont de grands jeux costumés pratiqués par des adultes. Ils consistent à incarner un personnage pour s’immerger dans des mondes fantastiques et interactifs. Les collectifs qui se forment à cette occasion sont éphémères, puisque les participants ne se fréquentent physiquement que quelques jours par an. Ainsi, malgré le temps de préparation qui occupe les organisateurs presque toute l’année, lorsqu’ils se rencontrent, les joueurs n’ont que très peu de temps pour entrer dans la peau de leur personnage et s’immerger dans la partie. Cette contribution étudie la façon dont ils collaborent dans des rassemblements qui peuvent atteindre 8 000 participants, sans forcément se connaitre au préalable ni connaitre en détail l’univers du jeu. L’hypothèse est que le jeu crée ses propres cadres d’action, notamment en agissant sur la temporalité et génère ainsi des modes de socialisation accélérée.

2
vues

0
téléchargements
Aurait-on assisté au grand soir de la santé mentale aux États-Unis ? Lors du premier face à face entre les deux principaux candidats à l’élection présidentielle américaine, le 26 septembre, Hillary Clinton a dénoncé les discriminations dont sont victimes les personnes touchées par des troubles psychiques. Celles qu'on désigne, trop souvent, sous le terme de « fous ». Alors que la campagne nous offre un spectacle affligeant de bassesse, cette sortie de la candidate démocrate n’a peut-être pas suscité toute l’attention qu’elle mérite. [Premier paragraphe]

in Critique internationale Publié en 2017-01
4
vues

0
téléchargements
Cet article propose un éclairage nouveau sur le fonctionnement de la confédération patronale européenne, l’Union des industries de la communauté européenne (UNICE), devenue Business-Europe en 2007. Si le constat de l’hétérogénéité des intérêts qui y sont représentés n’est plus à faire, reste à comprendre l’évolution des acteurs perçus comme légitimes pour la mettre en action. Alors que les représentants des organisations nationales membres ont longtemps occupé une place centrale, ils sont progressivement contestés par l’affirmation des salariés « européens » de la confédération. À partir d’archives et d’entretiens, ce texte décrit la production de différentes formes de légitimités à dire l’européen ainsi que l’évolution de leurs modalités de coexistence. La fabrique composite de cette légitimité à mettre en action l’UNICE éclaire à la fois la diversité des conceptions dont fait l’objet un euro-groupe et la pluralité des ressources mobilisées par les acteurs pour y exister.

Publié en 2015-06
FRASZ Dana
MORRIS Hanna
ABBE Ruth
REHBERGER Emily
0
vues

0
téléchargements
California's Silicon Valley is one of the wealthiest places in the United States where job growth, income, and venture capital flourish at or near record highs. Despite these positive trends, many people in the region are struggling just to get enough food. In Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties 1 in 4 people and 1 in 3 children are at risk of hunger and food stamp participation in the region hit a 10-year high in 2012. Meanwhile, 40% of all food produced in the US is wasted. The reality of hunger and wasted food is costly to the environment, the economy, and the health of our communities. The costs of uneaten food and empty bellies are often hidden but are significant. Each year hunger costs our nation $130.5 billion in health care for hunger-linked medical issues, $19.2 billion in reduced educational and workplace productivity, and $17.8 billion of charitable contributions to address hunger, totaling to $167.5 billion per year. In California, the cost of hunger was $19.6 billion in 2010. Meanwhile, the US spends $165 billion each year on food that just gets thrown away and then pays $750 million each year for its disposal. Wasted food is a disaster for the environment too as it wastes valuable resources like water and energy and is the third largest greenhouse gas emitter globally behind China and the US.

in The Conversation.fr Publié en 2016-03
CLOTEAU Armèle
36
vues

36
téléchargements
Des montagnes de fruits et de légumes comestibles mis en décharge aux invendus remplissant les bennes des supermarchés, le « gaspillage alimentaire » fait parler de lui. En France, une loi a même été votée en février 2016 pour lutter contre ce phénomène. C’est à travers des chiffres, des kilos voire des tonnes jetés régulièrement, que ce problème ancien est devenu aujourd’hui un véritable enjeu politique.

in Discovery society Publié en 2016-09
BARNARD Alex
8
vues

0
téléchargements
The series of practices for acquiring, preparing, and cooking with “waste” – as well as, occasionally, re-wasting it – reveals how the ethical commitment of turning waste into food creates challenges for adopting other ethical practices.

Suivant