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  • JACQUOT Sophie (7)
  • BALME Richard (4)
  • GROSSMAN Emiliano (3)
  • CLIFT Ben (3)
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  • Article (27)
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in Review of International Political Economy Publication date 2013-11
JOHNSON Juliet
MÜGGE Daniel
SEABROOKE Leonard
GRABEL Ilene
GALLAGHER Kevin
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An anniversary issue provides an inescapably inviting opportunity to reflect on the past, evaluate the present, and contemplate the future. Eschewing the self-congratulatory rhetoric of traditional anniversary celebrations, we have devoted this 20th anniversary issue of RIPE to contributions that critically examine the academic discipline of international political economy, focusing on our collective challenges and limitations as much as on our achievements. As every author knows, it is the thoughtful, constructive, and above all critical review that ultimately pushes us to produce better scholarly work. The global financial crisis mandates such a reassessment, as did the fall of communism that birthed this journal. [First paragraph]

Sous la direction de CLIFT Ben, WOLL Cornelia Publication date 2012-12
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The recent financial crisis has demonstrated that governments continuously seek to steer their economies rather than leaving them to free markets. Despite the ambitions of international economic cooperation, such interventionism is decidedly local. Some politicians even proudly evoke "economic patriotism" to justify their choices. This volume links such populism to a specific set of tensions – the paradox of neo-liberal democracy – and argues that the phenomenon is ubiquitous. The mandate of politicians is to defend the economic interests of their constituents under conditions where large parts of economic governance are no longer exclusively within their control. Economic patriotism is one possible reaction to this tension. As old-style industrial policy and interventionism gained a bad reputation, governments had to become creative to assure traditional economic policy objectives with new means. However, economic patriotism is more than just a fashionable word or a fig leaf for protectionism. This volume employs the term to signal two distinctions: the diversity of policy content and the multiplicity of territorial units it can refer to. Comparing economic interventionism across countries and sectors, it becomes clear that economic liberalism will always be accompanied by counter-movements that appeal to territorial images. This book was published as a special issue of the Journal of European Public Policy. (Résumé éditeur)

in Accounting, Economics and Law: A Convivium Publication date 2016-03
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1st lines: It is a privilege to be read and discussed by such insightful scholars, several of which have made important contributions to our understanding of industrygovernment relations and financial regulation in recent history. Their reading of my own analysis has given me a much sharper sense of my argument. Indeed, I agree with many of their comments, including some of the critical ones, and believe our discussion contributes positively to the still on-going political analysis of the recent global crisis. The reviews all thoroughly engage with the political analysis and the empirical discussion of the bank bailout schemes presented in the book. Their main thrust differs, however, and it is helpful to organize my response by grouping them according to the focus of their criticism. This allows me to clarify three subjects in my rejoinder to the following discussion: the nature of power, the use of the chicken-game metaphor and the role of healthy banks in different countries.

in Comparative European Politics Publication date 2010-04
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This article examines the importance of action-theoretical considerations in European studies. By outlining the notion of “usage” of the European Union, we argue for a more systematically sociological consideration of strategic action in the study of European transformations. The recent turns towards constructivism and comparative political sociology allow analyzing the rationality of political actors without falling in the trap of overly reductionist rational choice assumptions. Concentrating on intentional action helps to reveal the importance of three aspects of the multi-level polity: (1) informal and non-constraining procedures, (2) the effects of ways in which actors move in between the different levels of the European political system, and (3) the ambiguous and often surprising coalitions that come together despite often considerable disagreement over their final goals.

Cet article s'intéresse à l'influence de la sociologie dans l'analyse de l'action publique européenne. Nous revenons notamment sur la notion "d'usage" que nous avons développée auparavant et plaidons pour une prise en compte plus systématique de l'action stratégique dans l'analyse des transformations européennes. Nous analysons les évolutions récentes des études européennes vers une prise en compte plus systématique de l'imbrication sociale des acteurs, ce qui permet d'étudier leur rationalité sans tomber dans certains pièges des approches du choix rationnel trop réductrices. L'analyse de l'action intentionnée permet de mettre en lumière trois dimensions spécifiques des transformations européennes : (1) les processus non contraignants et informels, (2) les effets de la circulation des acteurs entre les différents niveaux du système européen, et (3) l’importance des coalitions ambiguës et parfois inattendues qui se forment, souvent malgré des divergences profondes sur les objectifs à atteindre.

in Les usages de l'Europe : acteurs et transformations européennes Sous la direction de JACQUOT Sophie, WOLL Cornelia Publication date 2004
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Pourquoi faire une sociologie politique des usages de l’intégration européenne ? La réponse nous semble résider dans l’évolution des théories de la construction européenne. Initialement, l’objet des études européennes était d’expliquer un régime ou une coopération internationale. Par conséquent, les théories dominantes étaient issues du champ des relations internationales. D’un côté, on trouvait des explications fonctionnalistes1 puis néo-fonctionnalistes2, de l’autre, la critique des réalistes et la théorie de l’intergouvernementalisme libéral3. Dans les deux cas, l’ambition était d’expliquer la création et la stabilité d’une coopération entre Etats, et d’analyser les politiques produites à ce niveau supranational. Les politiques nationales étaient un facteur qui déterminait les choix faits au niveau supranational, mais l’étude des politiques nationales se développait relativement indépendamment des études européennes (...).

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Many observers agree that the multilateral liberalization of service trade was a response to the intense lobbying efforts of financial service companies. In contrast, many of the firms that were affected by the General Agreement on the Trade of Services did not know where their interests lay in the multilateral negotiations and only began to work with their governments very late in the process. This paper shows that the preference evolution of service companies – both the first movers and the late comers – cannot be explained with reference to material rationality only. As a radically new trade issue, service trade was a realm of great uncertainty for business and they relied on social devices rather than pure economic calculations to determine how to position themselves on liberalization. In times of uncertainty, the differential logic of social embeddedness and the institutional constraints of a firm’s national setting are therefore a more appropriate indicator for business demands than material incentives arising from the global economy.

in Politiques européennes Publication date 2009-09
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On November 5, 2002, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) handed down a series of judgments against eight European Union (EU) Member States concerning the bilateral air service agreements between the Member States and the United States (U.S.). Brought to the ECJ by the European Commission in 1998, the ruling concerned the competence division between the EU Member States and the European Commission in the area of international air transport. While the Member States traditionally have exclusive authority over international air service negotiations, the European Union had gained considerable competence over internal aviation matters during the integration of the European aviation market in the 1990's. While the ruling maintained that the Member States had exclusive competence over external air transport negotiations, it did find several items negotiated in those agreements in conflict with the provisions of the European Communities (EC) Treaty. The so-called “nationality clause” negotiated in the air service agreements, it argued, is, in principle, a community competence, as are articles relating to computer reservation systems and intra-EU tariffs in “open skies” agreements. [First paragraph]

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