Co-auteur
  • HALPERN Charlotte (14)
  • ANDREOTTI Alberta (13)
  • FAUCHER Florence (13)
  • LASCOUMES Pierre (13)
  • Voir plus
Type de Document
  • Article (55)
  • Partie ou chapitre de livre (44)
  • Livre (29)
  • Audiovisuel (17)
  • Voir plus
2
vues

0
téléchargements
Dans cet entretien, Patrick Le Galès, directeur de recherche au CNRS, CEVIPOF Sciences Po, nous livre les premiers éléments issus d'une vaste enquête qu'il coordonne avec d'autres chercheurs sur "les cadres supérieurs dans les grandes villes européennes, mobilité et ségrégation, une comparaison entre Paris, Lyon, Madrid, Milan et Londres". Cette recherche porte sur les stratégies de différenciation, voire "d'exit", des cadres supérieurs par rapport aux sociétés nationales, et sur l'éventuelle constitution d'une "nouvelle bourgeoisie transnationale". Ses premiers résultats fournissent des éléments d'analyse passionnants sur la place des familles dans ces stratégies et leurs relations aux territoires métropolitains.

in International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences Publié en 2015-05
19
vues

0
téléchargements

in La gouvernance territoriale; Pratiques, discours et théories Publié en 2013-07
6
vues

0
téléchargements

Introduction: For more than a century now, states have intervened strongly to alleviate the social and economic consequences of crises in capitalism. New models of regulation, such as Keynesianism, have been invented to deal with capitalist contradictions: to socialize the huge losses booked by banks and large firms, change policy instruments, correct market failures, support regions in decline, transform labor market regulations or create new markets whilst supporting creative destruction. Crises inspire us to think in new ways about periods and varieties of capitalism, about regulation crises and dynamics and about the role, functions and characteristics of the state. At the same time, crises are a great source of tension, pushing political debates to the extreme, sparking waves of protest, and generating political pressures or anti-democratic trends that call into question the very legitimacy of the state. The 2008 financial crisis and the ensuing recession demonstrate both the power and the vulnerability of the modern state. Severely buffeted by the economic crisis, most advanced democracies were forced to take drastic policy measures that often included hugely expensive public interventions in the private sector, only some of which have been paid back. Such measures threw the state's centrality into sharp focus. Although major recessions have challenged the strength and capacity of the state, they have not called into question the role of the state as the primary agent of policy initiatives, nor its legitimate authority to respond to economic crises. The current crisis is no exception and has incited the rapid development of myriad state interventions, both internally and in relation to other states: active policy responses have been deployed across the world, from China and Brazil to the USA. In Europe, states are paying a huge price to support their banks (Woll, in press), and many Southern and Western European countries, under intense pressure from other states and market actors, have taken unprecedented austerity in response to the ongoing European fiscal crisis. There are also other fundamental changes occurring within states. A large strand of political economy research has been devoted to examining the ways in which states have restructured extensively in response to globalization, changing societies, and other phenomena, such as the worsening of long-term fiscal crises or implementation failures. The reach of the state is growing in certain fields, such as auditing, market making or penalizing; it is retreating in others. Whilst some scholars evoke a new phase of the Weberian state and others point to the emergence of neoliberal governmentality, most of us remain slightly confused. Indeed, what is happening to the state—both to specific states and the state in general—is the subject of a massive, disputed and perplexing literature. For instance, sessions devoted to Brazil at the SASE conference in Milan characterized the Brazilian state as complex, hybrid, developmental, post-developmental, neoliberal, soft neoliberal, multilevel … and difficult to conceptualize. Indeed! (The same may be said for more countries than Brazil.) Social scientists in particular have shown themselves to be endlessly creative in their quest to qualify the state, putting forward a remarkable list of adjectives to characterize the state's many forms, functions and dynamics. These include corporatist, managerial, developmental, welfare, warfare, workfare, punishing, hollowed out, regulatory, post-military, obsolete, submerged, standardizing, constrained, activist, technological, virtual, repleted, post-statist, carceral, retreating, unsustainable, cosmopolitan, failed, post-modern and, most recently, post-neoliberal (Grugel and Riggirozzi, 2013). It remains to be seen whether inventing labels leads to clear analytical insights. The state question is not just about political order; it is also about contradictions, failures, democratic contest, economic crisis, climate change, surveillance, war, fragmentation, reform—states may be here to stay, but they are not the same as they once were. Ongoing conceptual debates about the nature of the state and what constitutes statehood are both intimidating and fascinating. The rise of non-positivist approaches to the state that include state trajectories in different parts of the world is both intellectually stimulating and puzzling (Migdal, 2009; Vu, 2010; King and Le Galès, 2011). But for the sake of this article, the state will be understood in a more classic sense of the term: a political form intended to be permanent; a complex set of interdependent, relatively differentiated and legitimate institutions; autonomous; based in a defined territory; and recognized as a state by other states. Here, the state is also characterized by its administrative capacity to steer, govern a society, establish constraining rules, solve conflict, exercise authority, protect citizens and make war. Additionally, contemporary states are part of a capitalist system: they set and guarantee property rights, guarantee exchanges and organize economic development by taxing and concentrating resources. The state has taken different shapes in different eras and different countries: it has no absolute form and may even be considered a narrative or a legitimizing myth. Furthermore, key dimensions of state activity may be ‘submerged’ or hidden, that is, made invisible for citizens to develop state capacity without facing citizen hostility (Mann, 1984; Levi 2002; Jessop, 2007; Mettler, 2011). The article argues that the contemporary transformations of states are related to processes of changing scales, particularly supra-national and infra-national processes. Critical urban scholars have written extensively about the organization of societies on different scales. They emphasized the tensions created by mobility, pressures of capital and political logics (Brenner, 1999). Depending on the scale at which societies are organized, they may become more or less structured and institutionalized over time as a result of integrating, centralizing and embedding culture, the economy and the making of a social and political order. This led to what Michael Mann (2013b) has called ‘uncaging’ of citizens and networks. Whilst Mann sees uncaging as a possible but very limited process, this article pays tribute to the exceptional work of this great British sociologist from UCLA and his formidable four-volume work titled Sources of Social Power, particularly, the last two volumes published in 2013 dealing with the twentieth century. Whilst Mann (1997) was famously sceptical about the impact of globalization on the retreat of the state, this article deals with Europe and identifies three types of processes: the uncaging of society, the de-nationalization of society isolating economic policy from democracy and the rise of infra-national territories.

5
vues

0
téléchargements
L'appropriation et l'utilisation du sol dans les villes européennes sont visées par un ensemble nombreux d'activités publiques comme la planification urbaine ou la construction d'opérations de quartiers résidentiels ou d'affaires. Toutefois, la comparaison menée entre Paris et Bruxelles, deux capitales retenues pour leurs similitudes contextuelles, montre le contraste entre ces villes quant à leur mode de gouvernance et de production des politiques foncières. Cette différence de trajectoire de l'action publique, et ce faisant de développement urbain, s'explique par des effets d'institutionnalisation qui s'agencent au cours d'un processus de temps long exerçant des contraintes sur les stratégies et intérêts des investisseurs-capitalistes urbains, des acteurs politico-administratifs locaux et des mouvements urbains du cadre de vie. Cette thèse mobilise de façon inédite l'institutionnalisme historique dans ce secteur structurant à l'échelle urbaine. Ainsi, l'hypothèse principale stipule que les institutions, apparues dès le 19e siècle, de la propriété foncière et du capitalisme immobilier urbain ont construit et renforcé durablement leur rôle des investisseurs capitalistes comme metteur en œuvre de l'action foncière. Au cours de phases ultérieures, les dispositifs institutionnels de l'économie mixte et de la réhabilitation urbaine ont été générés par ce même cadre. Pour approfondir les causalités, ont été dégagées deux séries de mécanismes tantôt institutionnels (spécification ou activation des règles) tantôt d'interactions (interdépendance entre segments de l'Etat et ajustement entre les intérêts économiques et les comportements de prédation du gouvernement urbain).

Alors que six milliards de personnes habiteront dans une grande ville en 2050, les projets d’urbanisme se multiplient pour proposer un aménagement compatible avec la densité de population urbaine à venir. Imposée par la lutte contre le réchauffement climatique, la sobriété énergétique se devra par ailleurs d’être au rendez-vous, même si elle se heurte souvent à la remise en cause de nos modes de vie. Alors, à quoi devront ressembler nos villes de demain ? Pourrons-nous créer des paradis économiquement dynamiques et écologiquement soutenables ou bien sommes-nous condamné.e.s à des enfers pavés de nos bonnes intentions ?

in Handbook of European Societies Publié en 2010
1
vues

0
téléchargements

in Dialoghi Internationale Città nel Mondo Publié en 2007
3
vues

0
téléchargements
La regione urbana di Milano è un classico argomento di discussione dei sociologi urbani che si sono formati studiando gli appassionati testi in cui, agli inizi del ventesimo secolo, Max Weber, Werner Sombart e Georg Simmel hanno discusso il rapporto tra città, cultura, arte, sviluppi tecnologici, capitalismo e dominio. Le domande che questi autori si ponevano riguardavano l’influenza di particolari condizioni strutturali, sociali, economiche, politiche e culturali – come il capitalismo –, e i loro effetti sulle città o sul comportamento individuale e collettivo, sui modi di pensare, gli stili di vita, la creazione culturale e l’immaginazione. (Premier paragraphe)

L'un des éléments qui caractérisent le processus de mondialisation de l'économie est le développement de la logistique du fret comme secteur stratégique pour déterminer les avantages concurrentiels des régions urbaines. Cette étude analyse le lien entre l'évolution du marché, la réorganisation de l'Etat et le développement des infrastructures logistiques urbaines. Le point d'entrée de cette analyse est l'étude des politiques qui ont produit et gouverné au fil du temps deux marchés alimentaires de gros européens : le MIN Rungis et les Marchés Généraux de Milan. Leur comparaison explique comment les changements structurels ont influencé leur évolution et pourquoi aujourd'hui deux marchés de gros qui étaient initialement très similaires d'un point de vue analytique différent, ont deux policy outcome très différents. En utilisant une approche théorique et méthodologique basée sur les contributions du néo-institutionnalisme historique et de l'économie politique urbaine, le rôle des groupes d'intérêts, des acteurs politiques, des règles politiques et du marché est éclairé. Ces facteurs sont liés entre eux pour expliquer la policy conversion observée pour le MIN Rungis et la policy drift dans le cas de Milan. Enfin, les processus politiques qui ont mené à ces résultats sont expliqués en termes de mécanismes causaux. L'analyse met en évidence le rôle central des règles de politique locale et du contexte politique dans la détermination de la capacité des groupes d'intérêt locaux à influencer les processus décisionnels, et l'effet de leur mobilisation sur le développement de ces infrastructures urbaines.

in Une "French touch" dans l'analyse des politiques publiques ? Publié en 2015-01
7
vues

0
téléchargements

Suivant