Co-auteur
  • GEHRKE Bernd (3)
  • TRANVOUEZ Yvon (2)
  • KENNEY Padraic (2)
  • GÉRARD Emmanuel (2)
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Type de Document
  • Partie ou chapitre de livre (19)
  • Article (18)
  • Livre (8)
  • Article de presse ou magazine (3)
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On sait que le concile Vatican II (1962-1965) a profondément modifié la direction dans laquelle le catholicisme évoluait, peut-être dans des proportions comparables au concile de Trente (1545-1563). L’esprit de Vatican II est, bien entendu, très étroitement lié à ce qui s’est passé pendant les quatre années des sessions conciliaires, mais il est devenu assez vite beaucoup plus que cela : une sorte de libre interprétation de ce que le concile avait proposé dans des termes parfois contradictoires. Cela tient notamment à ce que, à bien des égards, l’esprit de Vatican II est aussi le produit d’un demi-siècle de développement d’un catholicisme qu’on a dit ou qui s’est dit de gauche, et qui n’a cessé de se modifier alors que, traditionnellement, la majorité des fidèles accordait ses préférences à des formations politiques de droite. [Premier paragraphe]

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The Second Wave of Western European Left Catholicism, c. 1965 – c. 1975, introduced manifold innovations in comparison to the First Wave, c. 1944 – c. 1954, in addition to reinforcing older traditions, such as the phenomenon of worker priests, which had served as the most visible and symbolic marker of progressive Catholicism in the immediate postwar era. Of the organizational novelties leaving their mark on the post-Vatican II era, it is probably fair to say that the emergence and powerful presence of radical priest associations, above all the Christian Solidarity International Congress, and the rise of spontaneous ecclesial communities, eventually best known by the term ‘base communities’, were the principal innovations. In addition, the specifically Catholic contribution to the European (and worldwide) student movements, as well as the specifically Catholic impetus behind radical working class practices in the Long Sixties were likewise unprecedented phenomena. There had been Catholic agitators in workers’ movements in the immediate postwar era, but such actions took a different form compared to Catholic working class activism in the Long Sixties, the latter period witnessing radical activity organized by Catholic trade unions, a feature with no parallel twenty years earlier. The rise of progressive, system-challenging radical student movements as such, not just the specifically Catholic battalions within those currents, was of course also a phenomenon entirely without precedent in European history. [First paragraph]

in La rivoluzione in concilio. La contestazione cattolica negli anni Sessanta e Settanta Publié en 2017-10
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La contestazione cattolica esplosa dopo il Concilio vaticano II scosse in profondità l’intera Chiesa, con tensioni che fecero apparire prossima una lacerazione insanabile dei due esiti estremi, scisma e abbandono. Tra gli anni Sessanta e Settanta, i numerosi gruppi del dissenso cattolico progressista, come i meno diffusi circoli tradizionalisti, si caratterizzarono per il loro radicalismo politico e religioso, con iniziative spesso clamorose che si alimentarono e diffusero a contatto con le manifestazioni del Sessantotto. Il libro ricostruisce, anche attraverso documenti inediti, le vicende dei gruppi cattolici che in Europa occidentale e, in particolare, in Italia intesero rivoluzionare il presente per costruire la Chiesa e la società del futuro. Si trattò di una stagione di conflitti, breve e intensa, che non fu senza conseguenze: l’onda lunga delle trasformazioni maturate in quegli anni, attraverso traiettorie anche molto diverse, è arrivata fino ad oggi. Présentation de l'éditeur

Based on documents collected in six European countries, European Socialists Respond to Fascism: Ideology, Activism and Contingency in the 1930s is a transnational study of largely parallel developments in Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, and Spain in the years 1933-1936. Triggered into action by the shock effect of the Nazi rise to power in Germany, socialists throughout Western Europe entered an unusually active period of practical reorientation and debate over political strategy which helped determine the contours of European politics up to the outbreak of World War II and beyond. Stressing the transnational dimension of this process while simultaneously integrating local, regional, and national factors, this work finds that it was social democracy, rather than communism, that acted as the primary vehicle for radical change among European marxists during the 1930s. Following major figures within the European left and the significant events that made up the inter-war period, Gerd-Rainer Horn demonstrates the interconnectedness of Europe's interwar socialists. Finally, Horn manages to relate these findings to the ongoing interdisciplinary debate on structure, agency, and contingency in the historical process.

in Ereignis, Symbol, Chiffre Publié en 2010-01
HORN Gerd-Rainer
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in Actes du Colloque sur l'Internationale communiste Publié en 1992-01
HORN Gerd-Rainer
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in The transformation of the Christian Churches in Western Europe (1945-2000) Publié en 2010-01
HORN Gerd-Rainer
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Sous la direction de HORN Gerd-Rainer, GÉRARD Emmanuel Publié en 2001-01
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This volume constitutes the first attempt to analyse the phenomenon of Western European Left Catholicism from a comparative and transnational perspective. Decisively shaped by the turbulent atmosphere of war, occupation and resistance, the years 1943-1955 gave rise to a most unusual flowering of progressive initiatives in Catholic politics, theology and apostolic missions. Though suffering severe setbacks in the deep freeze of Cold War politics, mid-century Western European Left Catholicism was not without influence in the subsequent emergence of Latin American Liberation Theology and the deliberations of Vatican II.(Editor's presentation)

in Nie Wieder Krieg! Antimilitarismus und Frieden in der Geschichte de Sozialistischen Jugendinternationale Publié en 2012-05
HORN Gerd-Rainer
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Seit 1907 sind sozialistische Jugendorganisationen weltweit in einer eigenen Internationale zusammengeschlossen. Der Kampf gegen den Militarismus gehörte zu den wichtigsten Gründungsmotiven und er blieb ein Leitmotiv ihrer Arbeit im 20. Jahrhundert. Die Beiträge des Bandes beleuchten verschiedene Aspekte dieser friedenspolitischen Geschichte: Sie fragen nach Handlungsmustern und Problemdeutungen sowie nach den Antworten, die die Internationale darauf suchte und gab. Dazu nehmen sie ebenso die Strukturen der Internationale wie auch die politischen Rahmenbedingungen in den Blick, zumal im Vergleich mit anderen Organisationen.(Presentation Editor)

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